Re: Panegyric of Bruzio Visconti by Bartolomeo da Bologn

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The plausible relation between Petrarca's Trionfi poem (as illuminated manuscripts) and the Trionfi card genre is given by the fact, that it seems probable, that both appear at the same time, together with the fashion of Cassone, which were decorated with Trionfi poem motifs.
This observation is confirmed by the condition, that at least some of the Trionfi poem motifs also appear as really existent old Trionfi cards.

I don't think, that high-intellectual interpretations of single card details - as for instance 2 flying horses - change that.

Naturally the Sforza used the personal card deck also to manifest their rulership. But likely it wasn't the only one idea in the deck composition.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Panegyric of Bruzio Visconti by Bartolomeo da Bologn

82
Just a couple of brief additions. First, it is not relevant whether the CY Chariot card has anything to do with Plato. It might (I have made a weak argument to that effect), but what is important is that it relates to the Petrarchan theme of Pudicitia, of which in that instance, assuming it is in a marriage deck, the most important aspect is the bride's chastity. The PMB's is more general, closer to honor and virtue, as is the CVI's and similar, and in that regard Plato is much more relevant, first for the sex change (his lovers, at least, are male, and was permissible to in the early Renaissance to depict one lover as explicitly male) and second for the wings on the horses: if a woman, it is the archetype, if a man it is someone living and experiencing the archetype. That, too, is in Petrarch.

The second thing I want to add has to do with the CY Love card. Yhe word "amor" seems to be written on the tent. That is a fairly explicit link to Love. Most of the lettering has come off. Only the "m" is still visible (http://www.metmuseum.org/-/media/Images ... D49AC07C00). In Cicognara's drawing of the card, published in 1831, it is very clear. I see no reason to assume that he just made it up, unless you can find other made up details on the card. It is on p. 89 of Kaplan vol. 1. I cannot find a scan of it.

Re: Panegyric of Bruzio Visconti by Bartolomeo da Bologn

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Huck wrote:I don't think, that high-intellectual interpretations of single card details - as for instance 2 flying horses - change that. .
LMAO. I'm not making any arcane/"intellectual" arguments, I'm simply asking you to find a single attribute of Chastity in any Chariot beyond the CY. Even your counter-argument evidence of the Issy chariot clearly supports the reading of any of these cards as RULERSHIP - via a consort or the male ruler himself (and the CY Empress shares the Chariot's key attribute, but with an Imperial eagle, connecting the Milanese chariot's shield as an imperial fief with its own imprese, showing that the shield need not even be related to Chastity, although I would argue for polyvalence here: both the Empress and bride are virtuous beyond repute - chaste - but one ultimately derives her 'bon droyt' power from the other).

Petrarch productions follow the introduction of the ur-trionfi. The cards made the concept of trionfi fashionable. Petrarch triumphs subsequently blossomed, and a reason it did so was because it was easier to depict that much smaller number of subjects (6) in larger media, such as cassoni etc. Petrarch's trionfi are clearly a parallel phenomenon and as such there is no reason why an artist would depict a Petrarchan trionfo one way in every single other medium and yet a different way on card stock. The arguments for tarot as an expansion of Petrarch are convoluted in the extreme, without a single rationale as to why this was done other than the nominal one - there are two things named trionfi, so they must be the same. :-bd

Re: Panegyric of Bruzio Visconti by Bartolomeo da Bologn

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Phaeded wrote:
Huck wrote:I don't think, that high-intellectual interpretations of single card details - as for instance 2 flying horses - change that. .
LMAO. I'm not making any arcane/"intellectual" arguments, I'm simply asking you to find a single attribute of Chastity in any Chariot beyond the CY. Even your counter-argument evidence of the Issy chariot clearly supports the reading of any of these cards as RULERSHIP - via a consort or the male ruler himself (and the CY Empress shares the Chariot's key attribute, but with an Imperial eagle, connecting the Milanese chariot's shield as an imperial fief with its own imprese, showing that the shield need not even be related to Chastity, although I would argue for polyvalence here: both the Empress and bride are virtuous beyond repute - chaste - but one ultimately derives her 'bon droyt' power from the other).

Petrarch productions follow the introduction of the ur-trionfi. The cards made the concept of trionfi fashionable. Petrarch triumphs subsequently blossomed, and a reason it did so was because it was easier to depict that much smaller number of subjects (6) in larger media, such as cassoni etc. Petrarch's trionfi are clearly a parallel phenomenon and as such there is no reason why an artist would depict a Petrarchan trionfo one way in every single other medium and yet a different way on card stock. The arguments for tarot as an expansion of Petrarch are convoluted in the extreme, without a single rationale as to why this was done other than the nominal one - there are two things named trionfi, so they must be the same. :-bd
Hm. I remember, that I gave already my arguments for a chariot with a female driver.

I don't assume, that every deck called "Trionfi deck" in documents referred to Petrarca's Trionfi poem and his figures, but I think that the major line of development (that, what led to Tarot and its standard motifs later) was related, at least in its beginning.
Naturally it's possible, that decks with triumphal theme (military victory, peace contract, wedding) were older than deck's with Petrarca figures.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Panegyric of Bruzio Visconti by Bartolomeo da Bologna

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Image


Artist: Andrea di Bartolo Cini (fl. 1389-1428)
Title: Allegorie de la Justice in 'Chansonne des sept Vertus et des sept Arts liberaux destinee a Bruzio Visconti' (La Canzone delle Virtu e delle Scienze) de Bartolomeo di Bartoli. (ms. 599, fol. 4) c.1349
Location: Musee Conde' - Chantilly

Various Bruzio pictures with colors at
http://www.scalarchives.com
Search for "Bruzio"

**************

I found a short biography of Bruzio ... at treccani.it
Viscónti, Bruzio (o Brizio). - Uomo politico (m. 1356), figlio naturale di Luchino che lo fece (1336) podestà di Lodi. Rifugiatosi a Bologna presso Giovanni Visconti da Oleggio, cospirò contro di lui e ne fu bandito. Amante della poesia e buon poeta egli stesso, nel 1344 scrisse (sotto altro nome) un violento carme contro il Petrarca, che rispose con due delle sue Epystole metrice (libro II, 11 e 18). Morì povero, in esilio nel Veneto.

Automatic translation:
Viscónti, Bruzio (or Brizio). - Politician (d. 1356), natural son of Luchino who made him (1336) mayor of Lodi. Taking refuge in Bologna with Giovanni Visconti da Oleggio, he conspired against him and was banished. A lover of poetry and a good poet himself, in 1344 he wrote (under another name) a violent poem against Petrarch, who replied with two of his Epystole metrice (books II, 11 and 18). He died poor, in exile in the Veneto.
Bruzio also participated in a rebellion against Giovanni Visconti di Oleggio as Enrico or Arrigo degli Antelminelli, the grandfather of the Prince Fibbia from the Bolognese Tarocchino picture.

Also at treccani.it:
VISCONTI da Oleggio. - È un ramo dei Visconti di Milano, stabilitosi a Oleggio (km. 17,5 da Novara) nel sec. XII come quelli di Massimo e Invorio; perciò, come questi, appartatosi da Milano non ebbe parte nell'ascesa del ramo rimasto in città, benché non andasse perduta la coscienza dell'origine comune e milanese; nel 1277, nell'elenco delle famiglie nobili compilato dall'arcivescovo Ottone, sono ricordate due famiglie, di Oleggio e di Oleggio Castello. A quest'ultima appartenne l'unico personaggio noto della famiglia, Giovanni Visconti di Oleggio signore di Bologna e poi di Fermo. Una tradizione fissata da M. Villani, lo disse figlio naturale dell'arcivescovo Giovanni Visconti che lo proteggeva. Nacque invece da Filippo di Giovanni, verso il 1304, e seguì fin verso il 1336 la carriera ecclesiastica a Novara, quando il vescovo Giovanni Visconti, meglio conosciutolo, lo destinò alle armi: nel 1341 conducendo per Luchino Visconti truppe ai Pisani cadde prigioniero dei Fiorentini, venendo liberato poi dal duca d'Atene. Nel 1351 Giovanni lo mandò capitano del popolo e suo luogotenente a Bologna e come tale comandò le spedizioni viscontee in Toscana nel 1351 e 1352, la prima delle quali non riuscì a prendere Scarperia. Morto l'arcivescovo, Giovanni, sapendosi malvisto dai nipoti e successori, il 18 aprile 1335, sfruttando il malcontento dei Bolognesi, si fece riconoscere signore; ma poté a fatica difendersi contro l'ostinato sforzo di Bernabò Visconti per riprendere Bologna. Avversato prima dalla Chiesa, poi protetto dall'Albornoz, il 17 novembre 1360 cedeva Bologna al papa, ottenendo la signoria di Fermo e il rettorato della Marca. Morì a Fermo nel 1366.
Automatic translation :
VISCONTI from Oleggio. - It is a branch of the Visconti of Milan, who settled in Oleggio (17.5 km from Novara) in the century. XII like those of Massimo and Invorio; therefore, like these, he left Milan and had no part in the rise of the branch that remained in the city, although the awareness of the common and Milanese origin was not lost; in 1277, in the list of noble families compiled by archbishop Ottone, two families are mentioned, from Oleggio and Oleggio Castello. The latter was the only known character of the family, Giovanni Visconti di Oleggio, lord of Bologna and then of Fermo. A tradition established by M. Villani, said he was the natural son of Archbishop Giovanni Visconti who protected him. Instead, he was born of Filippo di Giovanni, around 1304, and followed his ecclesiastical career in Novara until around 1336, when the better known bishop Giovanni Visconti assigned him to arms: in 1341, leading troops to the Pisans for Luchino Visconti, he fell a prisoner of the Florentines , later being freed by the Duke of Athens. In 1351 Giovanni sent him captain of the people and his lieutenant to Bologna and as such he commanded the Visconti expeditions to Tuscany in 1351 and 1352, the first of which was unable to take Scarperia. When the archbishop died, Giovanni, knowing that he was frowned upon by his nephews and successors, on 18 April 1335, exploiting the discontent of the Bolognese, he made himself known as lord; but he could hardly defend himself against the obstinate effort of Bernabò Visconti to retake Bologna. First opposed by the Church, then protected by Albornoz, on 17 November 1360 he ceded Bologna to the pope, obtaining the lordship of Fermo and the rectorate of the Marca. He died in Fermo in 1366.
Huck
http://trionfi.com
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