Re: Le Tarot arithmologique - la séquence 1+4+7+10 = 22

331
On THF in the past there have been posts about historical attempts to link the four suits with element-like combinations of the four qualities hot, dry, warm, and cold. Both were initiated by Marco Ponzi.

One comes from a piece by Andrea Vitali. Marco says:
On this web page, I have found something relevant.

This passage is from Andrea Vitali's introduction to a book by Gerardo Lonardoni ("La via del sacro - I Simboli dei Tarocchi fra Oriente ed Occidente"):
Nell'opera Bizzarrie Accademiche di Giovan Francesco Loredano, troviamo discorsi e versi che furono letti e recitati presso l'Accademia degli Incogniti, fondata dal Loredano stesso. Fra questi troviamo il discorso Che moralità si può cavare dal giuoco delle carte dove l'autore ricalca quanto già descritto su questo vizio e sulla sua perniciosità.

Al termine egli compie una digressione sui semi delle carte che così descrive: " Si può dire, che nel giuoco delle carte s'intendano le quattro Stagioni dell'anno. Le Spade indicano la primavera, nella quale tutti i Principi muovono l'armi. I Denari figurano l'Estate, nella quale si raccolgono i grani, e l'entrate. Le Coppe ripiene di vino significano l'Autunno. I Bastoni sono simbolo del Verno, perché gli alberi del Verno sono nudi a guisa di Bastoni. Tanto più, che nel verno sono necessari i Bastoni per iscaldarsi"
In the book"Academical Bizarry" ("Bizzarrie Accademiche") by Giovan Francesco Loredano, we find discourses and verses that were read at the Academy of the Unknowns (Accademia degli Incogniti), founded by the same Loredano. Among those we find the discourse "What morality can be found in card playing", were the author says what we have already described about this vice and its dangerousness.

At the end he digresses about the suits that he describes in this way: "We can say that the game of cards represents the four Seasons of the year. Swords represent spring, when all Princes move to war. Coins represent Summer when income is produced after harvesting crops. Cups full of wine represent Autumn. Batons represent Winter, because during Winter trees are without leaves as Batons. Moreover, during winter wood is necessary for heating."


Loredano's book was published in 1655.
The connection of seasons to qualities is that Spring is wet and warm (like air), Summer is dry and warm (like fire), Autumn is dry and cold (like earth), and Winter is wet and cold (like water).

The other set of correspondences is in relation to the Sola-Busca, c. 1491 or later, proposed by Marco at viewtopic.php?f=12&t=530#p7367.
I propose this interpretation, mainly based on the court cards:
* Discs / Sanguineus
* Swords / Cholericus
* Batons / Melanchonicus
* Cups / Phlegmaticus

One thing I like in this idea is that it is pretty obvious. The four temperaments were a common concept in the XV century. Also, at least the association of Swords with the Cholericus and Cups with the Phlegmaticus are very direct. The other two suits are more problematic, since it is not even clear what the suit symbols are.

I am not particular confident that this hypothesis makes sense, but I think that the best method to attempt an interpretation is to start from the suits, and then move to specific cards.

I attach a table that illustrates the court cards that I think reasonably match (light blue is for the cards for which I found no match, the other colours correspond to the temperaments). The association has a few serious problems, e.g. the lions (typically associated to the Cholericus) in the King of Batons, the lute (associated to the Sanguineus or the Phlegmaticus) in the Page of Swords.

I also attach a few images from “Saturn and Melancholy” by Klibansky, Panofsky and Saxl. The top row is intended to illustrate the Pages in particular. The other two images suggest an interpretation for the Three of Swords (the pierced heart) and the Ace and Two of Cups (putti playing instruments and pouring water).

download/file.php?id=491

download/file.php?id=490
Here Sanguine is wet and warm (like air), Choleric is hot and dry (like fire), Melancholic is cold and dry (like earath), and Phlegmatic is cold and wet (like winter). The correspondences in the SB are only approximate. They work best for the pages, but I think they probably could be made to fit all of them, pending the determinatino of one or two that we don't know the meaning of. These correspondences are discussed further in following posts.

Marco suggests that the correspondences might work for the number cards as well, but he hasn't checked. I did check and could not find any rationale for assigning temperaments or elements to them.

I want to emphasize that this type of allegory, correspondences between suits and elements, temperaments, seasons, or humors, is not Pythagorean. The correspondences among elements, temperaments, seasons, humors, and qualities were done by Aristotle and his followers.

Re: Le Tarot arithmologique - la séquence 1+4+7+10 = 22

332
Alain wrote,
Recreative Aparte : From dices to Tarot
I expose my speculative take about Moakley's remark that cards replaced dices.

"Why are there fifty-six suit cards, and why are there twenty-one trumps? The answer is found when we remember that cards, as a game of chance, replaced dice almost completely. In the dice games which use three dice, there are fifty-six possible throws, and with two dice twenty-one.”

I. The 21 throws of 2 dices (with 6 faces 1,2,3,4,5,6) and the 21 Triomphes + 1 as Nulla = 22

I suggest that the 22nd is an invalid throw or Nulla [0].
I present the 21+1 invalid throw [0]) throws in the generation of the pentagonal Number 22 as 22 Triomphes :
22 = 1+4+7+10
For me the question is, why does it matter that there are 21 trumps and 21 throws of 2 dice? I am not aware of any game in which people took turns drawing one card each from the 21 and betting on whose would be higher. It is possible, of course, but a few straws would have been cheaper and easier to carry around.

The only way I can see it mattering is if people wanted to use tarot cards for divination. There were books where you could look up the different throws of the dice and find fortunes attached. These books went back to ancient times and existed throughout the middle ages. In ancient times the different throws were associated with different gods. In the middle ages they were associated with different saints; so they were even a kind of sacred literature. You can read about them at the Getty Museum's page, http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/we-tried-me ... -it-worked..

These books could easily be adapted to cards, according to some system of correspondence starting from low to high. However what would be important is the number associated with the card, not what was on it, and in fact there were no numbers on the early triumphs. Also I do not know if these books had a fortune for "invalid throw", but I think not. The book the Getty describes works with 3 dice. So with this book a regular deck would work well.Even though they, too, didn't have numbers written on them, at least you could count the suit signs and so avoid having have to memorize the order.

Can anyone think of any other reason why such a correspondence would matter, or some perspective in which it would be relevant?

Re: Le Tarot arithmologique - la séquence 1+4+7+10 = 22

333
Upon reflection, I need to modify something I wrote two posts back:
I want to emphasize that this type of allegory, correspondences between suits and elements, temperaments, seasons, or humors, is not Pythagorean. The correspondences among elements, temperaments, seasons, humors, and qualities were done by Aristotle and his followers.
Actually, it seems to me, this method of looking for hidden relationships among groups of naturally occurring phenomena is Pythagorean-influenced, even if not actually Pythagorean. It started with the reported observations of how the differences in sounds produced by shortening strings or decreasing weights (of blacksmiths' hammers) followed laws that could be used for prediction, namely, the same or similar ratios between string lengths and between weights. The idea is that mathematical rules guided the phenomena we observe in the universe. Plato's, or perhaps Timaeus"s (a real person, a Pythagorean), idea that the universe is built out of unseen triangles and squares is similar, although not directly confirmable by observation. The problem is that analogies were used to fill in the blanks between mathematics and observations, a problem that got worse with Aristotle. Pythagorean thinking didn't get back on track until the Renaissance, first with architects and painters, and then applied to the empirical world with Galileo and Kepler.

Now for a change in subject. While a humorial analysis of the suits that works for the Sola-Busca courts seems to work, approximately, does not work for the number cards, there is a clearly Pythagorean approach that I think does work for those cards. That is one between the Pythagorean account of the first 10 numbers and the corresponding number cards, both in the Sola-Busca illustrations and in the system proposed by Etteilla. I also think it works for the courts, with Pages = 1, Knights = 2, Queens = 3 and Kings = 4. I also think it works for the Marseille order of triumphs from I to X. I have presented my argument on the same thread as Marco's post about the temperaments. It is fairly involved, since it involves 66 cards, 56 of them in two systems. I used mainly the Theolgumena Arithmeticae, which wasn't readily available outside of Venice and Florence, and then only to the nobility and probably established scholars, in the 15th and early 16th century, until the print edition in 1543 Paris. But similar things were in other works readily available in Latin, as Decker showed in his book The Esoteric Tarot..In fact his sources in some cases fit better than the Theologumena.

This is not to advocate (unlike Decker) that the Marseille tarot, or any set of tarot trumps, was built on Pythagorean principles. However it is fairly clear that Etteilla intended his to be such, which is why he insisted it be called "cartonomancy": divination based on numbers with cards. It is an interpretive schema, not an explanation for how the tarot was designed (Etteilla and Decker to the contrary), and Pythagoreanism is quite flexible in its application. But as an explanation, such a scheme might have had some influence on the particular order of triumphs that we see consistently in France.

For clarification, it might help if I explained how my hypothesis differs from that in an account, or perhaps parody, presented as particularly objectionable by Franco Pratesi in a recent note (http://www.naibi.net/A/518-TRIONF1450-Z.pdf):
Quello che non riesco proprio ad accettare è l’idea che l’ipotetico geniale ideatore, una volta composto il suo sistema esoterico, e selezionate le immagini corrispondenti, non abbia trovato niente di meglio che inserirle e camuffarle in un mazzo di quelle carte da gioco, che si trovavano già da due o tre generazioni nelle mani dei giocatori. In qualche arcano modo, quell’inventore dovrebbe aver convinto fabbricanti e giocatori ad aggiungere al loro mazzo le sue carte speciali; poi il significato nascosto sarebbe stato finalmente decifrato da qualche illuminato visionario solo a partire dalla fine del Settecento, per la soddisfazione di tanti appassionati che ancora oggi coltivano il settore.

Osservo anche che le interpretazioni di tipo esoterico più volte e variamente suggerite dagli “esperti” sarebbero state abbastanza compatibili con l’atmosfera culturale che si creò attorno a Pico della Mirandola, ma si tratta di un’epoca posteriore di almeno mezzo secolo rispetto a quella di interesse e quindi potrebbe solo spiegare qualche eventuale trasformazione di una sequenza di carte trionfali già esistente; prima del 1440 su tutte quelle pseudoscienze – occulte o meno che fossero – non esistevano, o non erano state riscoperte, abbastanza fonti.

(What I just cannot accept is the idea that the supposed genius inventor, once he composed his esoteric system, and selected their corresponding images, would not have found anything better than to place them and camouflage them in a pack of those playing cards, which were already in the hands of players for two or three generations. In some mysterious way, that inventor would have convinced manufacturers and players to add his special cards to their decks; then the hidden meaning would finally be deciphered by some enlightened visionary only in the late eighteenth century, to the satisfaction of many enthusiasts who still cultivate the field.

I note also that the often esoteric interpretations variously suggested by the "experts" would be quite compatible with the cultural atmosphere that was created around Pico della Mirandola, but that is at least half a century later than of interest and then could only explain some eventual transformation of a sequence of triumphal cards already existing; before 1440 on all those pseudosciences - occult or less they were - did not did not exist, or had not been rediscovered, enough sources).
My hypothesis for the correspondence between Etteilla's system for the number cards and that I find illustrated in the Sola-Busca is not that he rediscovered something hidden in the cards. I doubt very much if Etteilla even knew about the Sola-Busca, and it certainly can't be found in the imagery of any other deck, for the number cards. My only guess is that Etteilla used an existing system of cartomancy with the ordinary deck and recognized that it was based on numbers. He did not seem to extend that recognition to the tarot sequence, because he completely changed the order. That pre-existing system may well have had very old roots, extending back even to late 15th century Northern Italy. It could also have been developed later, as Pythagoreanism did not die with the 15th century. The system that Pratesi found in Bologna has some similarities with that of Etteilla, not close but enough to suggest common roots.

Added later: Exactly when it was recognized that Pythagoreanism applied to the Marseille order of triumphs is not clear. The problem is that the Kabbalah also uses a Pythagorean-based approach, which was applied to the tarot first, I think, by Levi. At some point, however, the esotericists realized the Pythagorean basis, because it is rather evident in the work of Zane, who draws links between trumps and number cards.

I very much like the idea of picking Pico della Mirandola as a source of esoteric interpretations, even cartomantic interpretations, for both the ordinary deck and the tarot sequence. He and Poliziano, the expert on Roman history, did go on a tour of Italian libraries, which would have included a stop in Venice, in the decade before the Sola-Busca (with its triumphs based on obscure Roman heroes) was produced, a deck that has all the earmarks of a limited edition for an erudite patron.

That Pico is a half century later than the invention of the tarot is of no relevance to the development of an interpretive schema. Pico was a syncretist, a term that in our day is meant abusively as someone who forces connections among systems where none exist. Most of his interpretive schemas applied to writings much further back than a half century, more like 200-2000 years. No doubt their authors would have been as bewildered as the rest of us by what Pico did with them. I expect that the designers of the tarot, in at least some of its stages, would have felt the same way, if Pico applied his gifts to their products..

However we must remember that Plato's works, much influenced by the Pythagoreans, were the big news in Florence, Milan, and elsewhere even before the tarot, at the dawn of the 15th century. The Visconti had managed to grab Petrarch's own copy of Plato's collected works (this is my deduction from the fact that the Visconti got all of Petrarch's library except Petrarch's own works) and saw the first translation of the Republic in 1404, done without help from Florence (Hankins, Plato in the Italian Renaissance, vol. 1 p. 108, in Google Books). There may have been a propaganda motive: Plato's ideal resembled the Visconti state more than that of the Florentine. Florence rose to the challenge, chiefly in the person of the future chancellor, Leonardo Bruni, whose first translation, of the Phaedo, was in 1405 (Hankins p. 40), achieving a goal much desired by his mentor Salutati (p. 41); other dialogues followed, still in the first decade of the century (p. 51). In 1426-1427, he published a collection of some shorter dialogues and letters, dedicated to Cosimo de' Medici, which circulated widely (Hankins p. 66, not in Google Books). They included most notably part of the Phaedrus, with its famous charioteer. Ambrogio Traversari, architect of the Conclave thought that Platonism should be read through the filter of Christianity, as in pseudo-Dionysius, whom he translated in the late 1430s, a thinker who also can be made to fit the early tarot, if we assume that it had only 16 or so subjects at the time (those of the Cary-Yale, perhaps with some changes in subjects; see my "Platonism and the Tarot", at http://platonismandtarot.blogspot.com/). And who is to say that the early sponsors, or at least legislators on their use, were not part of the new trend started by Salutati or perhaps earlier? Pico and others might not have had that much to do.

Les 16 Honneurs- 4 séries emblématiques de 4=1+3

334
Les 16 Honneurs : 4 séries emblématiques de 4 = 1+3
RULES 1637 by MAROLLES
The other four plain suits are known as swords, batons, cups and coins: each of them consists of fourteen cards : namely the King, Queen, Cavalier and Jack , which are also called the four honours, and the remaining cards from the Ten to the Ace.


Ils sont répartis en quatre Emblèmes et hiérarchisés depuis le Valet jusqu'au Roi.
4x4 =16

L arithmologie pythagoricienne affirme que 16 est un Nombre carré de base 4.
Toutefois, les 16 figures, elles, sont séquencées en quatre carrés de 4.
Ce sont 4 Nombres carrés de 4 qui composent les 16 figures car elles sont distinguées en quatre ensembles distincts ou emblèmes.
Donc: 16 = 4x4
Le Tarot arithmologique lui offre une série de 4 carrés successifs soit :
4x4 = 16
Image


Or, l'arithmétique pythagoricienne explique qu'un nombre carré est la somme de deux nombres triangulaires successifs -
à savoir ici : 4 = 1+3
https://www.loebclassics.com/view/pytha ... 335.99.xml

Autrement dit,
"Un nombre carré est un nombre polygonal qui peut être représenté géométriquement par un carré."
Ainsi 4 peut être représenté par un carré de 2x2 points.

" Les nombres carrés sont donc les carrés parfaits non nuls - le n - ème étant n au carré.
Le produit de deux nombres carrés est un nombre carré.
La représentation du premier nombre carré est un point.
Celle du n -ème s'obtient en bordant deux côtés successifs du carré précédent par 2n - 1 points"
Image


Donc :
4 = 2 au carré = 1+3

Les Quatre Carrés des 16 Honneurs correspondent parfaitement à quatre carrés de 4 sachant que la génération pythagoricienne du nombre carré 4 est égal à 1+3 ( les deux nombres triangulaires successifs)
- quelles que soient les correspondances assignées :
Eléments / Emblèmes ou Enseignes / Emblèmes ou autres analogies
- quelle que soit la hiérarchie à donner aux quatre honneurs entre eux
- quelles que soient leurs valeurs respectives en points selon les règles du jeu.

La disposition arithmologique elle souligne spécifiquement que les Honneurs dans chaque emblème sont à compter comme :
1+3 = 4
1 et 3 sont les nombres deux triangulaires successifs composant le Nombre carré 4.

1 1
1 1
=
1
+
1
1 1

Nota bene
Nota bene :
L'ordre de lecture des nombres dans chaque rang du Nombre Carré 4 sera celui proposé par Théon de Smyrne et Jamblique , il est identique à celui du Nombre Pentagone 22, du Nombre Triangle 10 à savoir de droite à gauche.

Image


Post sciptum
Par ailleurs, cette disposition arithmologique du Nombre Carré 4 en géométrie plane donne la première figure solide dans l 'espace de la Pyramide :
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... on.svg.png

Ce qui devient intéressant, me semble-t-il, quand on pense que les cartes ordinaires avaient habituellement 3 figures auxquelles s'est surajoutée une 4è dans le Tarot...

3 4
1 2

Exemple :

- En attribuant la valeur en points de 1, 2, 3 et 4 à la série Valet (1) Cavalier(2) Reine (3) Roi (4), l 'on obtiendrait

D R
V C

- En attribuant aux Emblèmes une correspondance platonicienne avec les 4 Eléments

Le premier Carré de 4 serait celui de l 'Elément TERRE
Le second Carré de 4 serait celui de l' Elément EAU
Le troisième Carré de 4 serait celui de l' Elément AIR
Le quatrième Carré de 4 serait celui de l' Elément FEU

“D'abord que le Feu, la Terre, l'Eau et l'Air soient des corps, cela est sans doute évident pour quiconque.
....
Le Démiurge a placé l'Air et l'Eau entre le Feu et la Terre.
Ces Éléments au nombre de quatre ont formé le corps du Cosmos.
Harmonisé proportionnellement, celui-ci est Amitié."

(PLATON, Le Timée)

La hiérarchie des Éléments est donc :
Terre / Eau / Air / Feu
http://www.sgdl-auteurs.org/alain-bouge ... Biographie

Re: Le Tarot arithmologique - la séquence 1+4+7+10 = 22

335
mikeh wrote: I want to emphasize that this type of allegory, correspondences between suits and elements, temperaments, seasons, or humors, is not Pythagorean. The correspondences among elements, temperaments, seasons, humors, and qualities were done by Aristotle and his followers.
I guess, that this sort of idea is much older than Aristoteles and also older as Pythagoras. In the I-Ching (older than both) we have - for instance - 4 seasons, which are attributed to specific mathematical ideas. In Greek mythology we have gods, which are used to present systems. In Egyptian mythology ... etc.
Likely one finds such things everywhere, it's just a feature of mental operation, that such analogies are formed. Our mind classifies the idea "one day" in 4 parts with morning-midday-evening-night or - more precisely- in 24 hours. With some logic we can associate a zodiac with 12 signs to double hours, as the Chinese did it. Or we can associate 7 planets to the 168 hours of the week and can spend a lot of time with this this sort of astrology. Well, it's just our own mental operation, that we meet there.

The possible results of a throw with 2 dice (as a mathematical system) is incorporated as a subsystem in I-Ching. I've demonstrated that earlier, not only once. It's in both cases just the same mathematical structure.

1
The possible results of a throw with 3 dice (56 possibilities) have the basic partition ...
6 (all 3 dice show the same result, as 1-1-1 for instance)
30 (2 dice show the same result, the third has a different, as 1-1-2 for instance)
20 (all 3 dice show a different result, as 1-2-3 for instance)
---
56

2
The 56 cards of 4 suits (as incorporated in a Tarot deck) have naturally a 4x14 structure.

The second is just another system, and there is no good way to bring both systems together. Naturally - if somebody is fixed on the idea to bring them together - he/she can chose a way, whatever he/she likes. But: whatever he makes of it, it will look a little bit "artificial".

I remember, that Alain showed a way, how he did it ... or how somebody else did it, I don't remember.

I remember, that in school we were taught the "sentence of Pythagoras" with "3*3 + 4*4 = 5*5". Later I learned, that this math combination was long known before Pythagoras.
Is this a too difficult operation to follow in a case of "improved information"?
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Le Tarot arithmologique - la séquence 1+4+7+10 = 22

336
The possible results of a throw with 3 dice (56 possibilities) have the basic partition ...
6 (all 3 dice show the same result, as 1-1-1 for instance)
30 (2 dice show the same result, the third has a different, as 1-1-2 for instance)
20 (all 3 dice show a different result, as 1-2-3 for instance)
---
56
This system is "somehow" also in the I-Ching, just for logical reasons. The die operates with the number 6 and the I-Ching also, that's the point.

Image


6, 30, 20 .... You can count these numbers at this figure:

upper and lower ring (6 hexagrams each)
middle ring (20 hexagrams)
rings between "upper and lower rings" and "middle ring" (15 hexagrams each; 12 at the outside, 3 in the center) 2x15 = 30

Well, that's not a wonder, it's just logical. And it has nothing to do with the condition, that 4x14 = 56.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Les 40 numérales et les 4 Tetractys emblématiques

337
Les 40 numérales : 4 séries emblématiques de 1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9+10
RULES 1637 by MAROLLES
The other four plain suits are known as swords, batons, cups and coins: each of them consists of fourteen cards : namely the King, Queen, Cavalier and Jack (2), which are also called the four honours, and the remaining cards from the Ten to the Ace.

Les cartes numérales du Tarot sont au nombre de 40 réparties en quatre décades emblèmatiques - depuis l'As jusu'au Dix.

Image


L'arithmologie pythagoricinne les figurent géométriquement en 4 Tetractys

Image


La Tetractys de la Décade est un nombre triangulaire de base 4 dont les nombres sont disposés en quatre rangs successifs comportant 1 puis 2 puis 3 puis 4 points

Image


1
2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9 10

En d'autres termes :
"Définition
Pour tout entier n strictement positif, le n-ième nombre triangulaire est la somme des entiers de 1 à n."


La suite du quatrième Nombre triangulaire à savoir 10 est :
10 = 1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9+10

La disposition arithmologique en 4 Tetractys emblématiques correspond aux 4 Décades des 40 numérales
- quelles que soient les correspondances assignées
- quelles que soient leurs valeurs respectives en points selon les règles du jeu.

Nota bene :
L'ordre de lecture des nombres dans chaque rang du Nombre Triangle 10 sera celui proposé par Théon de Smyrne et Jamblique , il est identique à celui du Nombre Pentagone 22, du Nombre Carré 4 à savoir de droite à gauche.

Image


Exemple :
En attribuant aux Emblèmes une correspondance platonicienne avec les 4 Eléments

“D'abord que le Feu, la Terre, l'Eau et l'Air soient des corps, cela est sans doute évident pour quiconque.
....
Le Démiurge a placé l'Air et l'Eau entre le Feu et la Terre.
Ces Éléments au nombre de quatre ont formé le corps du Cosmos.
Harmonisé proportionnellement, celui-ci est Amitié."

(PLATON, Le Timée)

La hiérarchie des Éléments est donc :
Terre / Eau / Air / Feu

La première Tetractys de 10 serait celle de l 'Elément TERRE
La seconde Tetractys de 10 serait celle de l' Elément EAU
La troisième Tetractys de 10 serait celle de l' Elément AIR
La première Tetractys de 10 serait celle de l' Elément FEU
http://www.sgdl-auteurs.org/alain-bouge ... Biographie

Re: Le Tarot arithmologique - la séquence 1+4+7+10 = 22

338
Hi

My thesis is now presented.
Your contributions are welcomed.

Resume :
Le Tarot arithmologique
Image


Plan

Introduction : non rédigée

Ière Partie : les 22 sujets allégoriques et le Nombre Pentagone 22 = 1+4+7+10 [published]
Image

http://letarot.it/page.aspx?id=603

IIè Partie : les 56 cartes emblématiques : 16+40

Les 16 Honneurs : 4 séries emblématiques de 4 = 1+3 [submitted to discussion]
Image

viewtopic.php?f=11&t=1102&p=17646#p17639

Les 40 numérales : 4 séries emblématiques de 1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9+10 [submitted to discussion]
Image

viewtopic.php?f=11&t=1102&p=17646#p17645


IIIème partie :Commentaires et discussions
- les 22 sujets allégoriques et le Nombre Pentagone 22 = 1+4+7+10 [published]
http://www.associazioneletarot.it/page. ... 08&lng=ENG

Conclusion : non rédigée





PS
I'm be away sometime.

Best to everyone.
http://www.sgdl-auteurs.org/alain-bouge ... Biographie