Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#31
Boiado's main problem (in terms of his subsequent popularity & recognition) was not so much about his verses being 'rough', excepting in that they were heavily inflected by Lombardian dialect, and the subsequent view that anything in any other than Tuscan (and particularly) Florentine dialect was considered 'rough'. There are occasional problems with his rhythm/meter, but this may be because of modern or florentine reading with different accentual emphasis, but I'm not sure about that, mere speculation. His Orlando was subequently re-written in Florentine dialect (by someone whose name I can't remember at the moment - I am not thinking of Ariosto's continuation of the story, there was someone else who copied Boiardo' own poem but with florentine dialect 'fixes'), and that became more popular than Boiardo's own (and associated with the name of the Tuscan 'translator' (Berni?), rather than Boiardo himself).

SteveM
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#33
1523 appears to be the first published appearance of Boiardo's Triomphe poem, in an anthology of Petrarchian love poems by Giralomo Benivieni, a friend of Pico and Ficino* (in 1487 he published verses based upon Ficino's translation of Plato's Symposium, with a commentary by Pico). Possibly Benivieni received a manuscript copy of Boiardo's poem via Pico? Or had known Boiardo himself via his friendchip with Pico. According to an auction catalogue description the anthology was dedicated to Boiardo? I can't see such a dedication in the online 1523 edition, perhaps the auctioned edition was a personalized copy with a dedication? Possibly he knew Boiardo before he knew Pico (Boiardo had met Poliziano in 1473 during his visit to Florence, possbily Benivieni too).

BENIVIENI, Girolamo. Amore di Hieronimo Beniuieni fiorentino...Et una Caccia de amore bellissima et cinque Capituli, sopra el timore, zelosia, speranza, amore, et uno Trionpho del mondo, composta per il conte Matteo Maria Boiardo et altre cose diuerse. Venezia: Nicolò Zoppino e Vincenzo, 1523. 8°. Bel frontespizio architettonico, al colophon la marca di Zoppino con S. Nicola seduto nella cattedra episcopale con la mitra, tiene la mano destra alzata e nell'altra le tre palle d'oro su libro e ai lati le iniziali N.Z (restauri al margine inferiore destro di alcune carte, con lievissime perdite.) Raffinata silloge di componimenti pertrarcheschi di Benivieni, dedicata a Boiardo. Poeta amico intimo di Pico e Ficino, nella sua produzione è possibile cogliere suggestioni neoplatoniche proprie dell'ambiente fiorentino di fine Quattrocento.

I see no such dedication in the editions I have looked at. I wonder if the person cataloging the lot read composta per il conte Matteo Maria Boiardo as meaning the Triomphe were composed by Benivieni for Boiardo, not understanding they were composed by Boiardo? An easy mistake to make, considering it could be read that way, and is in what is otherwise an anthology of poems by Benivieni.

Est. Price: 500-700 Euro
Price realized: 900 Euro.

Benivieni was an adherent of Savanarola, and also “...revived Jacopone’s doctrine that madness for Christ’s sake is true wisdom, and wrote the Bonfire songs that Savanarola’s adherents sang in their procession.” One of those Bonfire songs (which Alain made reference to in the Le Tarot arithmologique thread) :

Non fu mai el piu bel solazzo,
Never was there more beautiful solace,

Piu giocondo ne maggiore,
more joyful or greater,

Che per zelo, e per amore
than through zeal, and through love

Di Jesu, diventar pazzo.
of Jesus, to become crazy.
...
Ognum gridi com’ io grido,
everyone shout as I shout,

Sempre pazzo, pazzo, pazzo.”
always crazy, crazy, crazy.

As an adherent of Savonarola, he was also an active participant in the bonfires of the vanities, so strange that of Boiado's poems he chose to include one about a card game!? One to while away the time, in this vain world...

SteveM

"But, from the standpoint of literature, the most
interesting production of the school of Marsilio
Ficino is the little book of Pico and Benivieni.
It was in 1479, when Marsilio had completed his
Plato and was about to apply himself to the
interpretation of Plotinus, that Giovanni Pico della
Mirandola, then seventeen years old, came to
Florence. At a social gathering, held perhaps in
the Medicean palace, he fell into discussion with
a Florentine citizen, ten years older than himself,
Girolamo di Paolo Benivieni, and formed with
him one of the most famous friendships in the
annals of literature."

From the introduction to "PLATONICK DISCOURSE UPON LOVE" by PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA, Edited by
EDMUND G. GARDNER, 1914.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#34
At least Benivieni lived a rather long time, 1453-1542, nearly 90 years at death. So a very big memory perhaps.

Image


Before 1523 there was - at least that's assumed - the existence of the card deck, which Viti described. And the cards had the text.

I find this curious note in a German book:

Rafael von Urbino und sein Vater Giovanni Santi
von J. D. Passavant, Band 1
Brockhaus, 1839 - 592 Seiten
https://books.google.de/books?id=Gnn35u ... ti&f=false

Image


According this a Pater (priest) Vernaccia left the framed note, and the reference seems to be the given text of 1835. I found this referenced text and it says not much more:

https://books.google.de/books?hl=de&id= ... io&f=false ... page 3 and 4
Image

Image


As I get it, he speaks only of 40 cards.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#35
Huck wrote: I find this curious note in a German book:

Rafael von Urbino und sein Vater Giovanni Santi
von J. D. Passavant, Band 1
Brockhaus, 1839 - 592 Seiten
https://books.google.de/books?id=Gnn35u ... ti&f=false

Image


According this a Pater (priest) Vernaccia left the framed note, and the reference seems to be the given text of 1835. I found this referenced text and it says not much more:

https://books.google.de/books?hl=de&id= ... io&f=false ... page 3 and 4
Image

Image


As I get it, he speaks only of 40 cards.
We have left from Father Vernaccia the following record*: - Pier Antonio Viti son of Bartolommeo was a poet: and we have seen with Gio. Maria Antonio Viti* his descendant a chapter in quarta rima, in which figures of playing cards represent four passions of the soul; that is, love, hope, jealousy, fear.

He only saw un capitola, a/one chapter, and also his memory was not quite right, it is in terza rima, not quarta rima, and also appears to think that Viti himself wrote it, rather than a commentary/description of it.

*Renier reports on this record of Vernaccio and mentions that Vernaccio's biographical notes are in Pesaro, Biblioteca Oliveriana, ms.1145. I have searched the online Oliveriana database with manuscript number and "Vernaccio" and cannot find any current record of it. I am presuming it is Padre Pier Girolamo Vernaccia, 1676-1742, of the Pious School, pastor of the arcade o the Colina Metaurica,author of the manuscripts Trees of the families of the illustrious men of Urbino and its justifications formed by Pier Girolamo Vernaccia (1706); Collection historical and other writings with which you justify genealogical trees of illustrious families of Urbino, which were formed by Pier Girolamo Vernaccia (1706), and Lives of some illustrious men of Urbino and memories of families of the same city by the Pier Girolamo Vernaccia, 1720.

*Giovanni Maria Antonio Viti was the name of Pier Antonio Viti's son.
SteveM wrote: Benivieni was an adherent of Savanarola, and also “...revived Jacopone’s doctrine that madness for Christ’s sake is true wisdom, and wrote the Bonfire songs that Savanarola’s adherents sang in their procession.” One of those Bonfire songs (which Alain made reference to in the Le Tarot arithmologique thread) :

Non fu mai el piu bel solazzo,
Never was there more beautiful solace,

Piu giocondo ne maggiore,
more joyful or greater,

Che per zelo, e per amore
than through zeal, and through love

Di Jesu, diventar pazzo.
of Jesus, to become crazy.
...
Ognum gridi com’ io grido,
everyone shout as I shout,

Sempre pazzo, pazzo, pazzo.”
always crazy, crazy, crazy.

As an adherent of Savonarola, he was also an active participant in the bonfires of the vanities, so strange that of Boiado's poems he chose to include one about a card game!? One to while away the time, in this vain world...
Another Bonfire song by Benivieni for Savanarola on the theme of ‘santo pazzo’ (holy craziness) is Della pazzia del christiano et de suoi effecti (on the craziness of the Christian and its effects).

Io co darti anima mia
Now I will give you, O my soul,

un rimedio sol che vale
a single remedy that applies

quanto ogni altro a ciascun male
more than all others against any ill,

che si chiama la pazzia.
named madness.


To tre oncs al meno di speme,
Take three ounces at least of hope

tre di fede e sei di amore,
three of faith and six of love,

due di pianto e poni insieme
two of tears and place together

tutto al fuoco del timore.
all on the fire of fear.

Fa da poi bollir tre hore
then boil it for three hours

premi enfine vi agiugni tanto
stir at the end and add as much

di humilita e dolor, quanto
of humility and sorrow as

basta a far questa pazzia.
is enough to make this madness.

This is just the refrain and first stanza. The bold words I have highlighted, are the four passions of the soul.

(Other Bonfire songs include the opposite of the crazy Christian, the crazy non-believer 'a un pazzo che non crede'.)

SteveM

Ref: Bonfire Songs: Savonarola's Musical Legacy, Volume 1 by Patrick Paul Macey
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#36
The bonfire was 1497, might be well the time, when Pier Antonio might have been active with the Boiardo cards.

Perhaps - naturally - stoic passions might have been a general fashion at that time.

Generally I would imagine, that Viti made first handpainted cards. The Urbino court had been for some time "against printing" (at least in the time of Federico). And the real extant cards don't look as made "very fine", perhaps a later production, which appeared with the books editions.

Dummett in the Boiardo article of 1973 mentions Carlo Lozzi, Le Antiche da Giuoco in La Bibliofilia, vol 1 (Florence 1900), who also speaks of the Boiardo deck (un mazzo di guoco morale, de c. 1500, detto delle Passioni), p. 37-46 and 181-6, consisting of 40 number cards and 21 trumps, suits as in the Boiardo.

**************

I captured from a youtube-movie to old Scandiano from a postcard ...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxT3TMvN6lw

Image


From a google.maps picture (Scandiano) I captured a restaurant perspective:

Image


Nearby is the Rocca, where Boiardo had lived.

Image

https://www.google.de/maps/dir/44.59827 ... a=!3m1!1e3
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#37
It's unknown to me, why Renier took Emilia Pia (actually Emilia Pia of Carpi and in Carpi ruled the Pio family) as a probable candidate for the "Lady of Urbino".
There were considerable differences between Boiardo and his relatives, the Pio family. A widow aunt, Taddea de' Pio (of Carpi), and her sons Giovanni and Giulio became the bad enemies in Boiardo's life. I don't know for the moment, how Taddea was related to Emilia Pia.
In the height (1474/75) of the family crisis, Taddea attempted a poison attack on Boiardo.


In Scandiano: (From http://trionfi.com/0/h/02/ )
1456 - Feltrino [Boiardo's grandfather] died, also his wife Giuduccia (1457). The heirs are his son Giulio Ascanio and Matteo Maria as his grandson. In their last will, they compelled Matteo Maria to share profits with uncle Guilio Ascanio, otherwise Matteo Maria would lose their inheritance. The father's family resentment to Matteo Maria would surface throughout the poet's life. The uncle governed the fiefs after Feltrino died and completely ignored Matteo Maria in all the official letters.
In contrast, the relations with the house of Strozzi (mother's side in the case of Boiardo) were very cordial. He probably got much influence of Tito Vespasiano Strozzi, a poet with preferences for erotic themes.

1460 - Giulio Ascanio, the mentioned unpleasant uncle, died. Giulios' widow, the Countess Cornelia Taddea was an ambitious and domineering woman and shared the title and administration of the Boiardo fiefs. Matteo Maria and his cousin share their patrimony until 1474.

October 1461 - Boiardo moves to Ferrara.

February 1462 - Boiardo returns to Scandiano, his main residence till 1468. There he resides with his Aunt Taddea de' Pio (of Carpi) and her sons Giovanni and Giulio, hunting and entertaining and managing the waters of the Secchia, which was a source of contention between the Boiardi and Commune of Reggio.

Cornelia's kinsman, Pio of Carpi, disputed the rights of Reggio ... two letters exist from Boiardo to Borso. The Duke Borso is said to have highly favored Boiardo, but Boiardo seems to have a warmer relationship later with the younger Ercole D'Este (duke since 1471.
..
April 1473 - Boiardo joins a procession that travels to Naples to accompany Eleanora of Aragon to Ferrara to marry Duke Ercole. The way leads via Rome, where an excessive and famous festivity on costs of the leading papal nephew took place (again perhaps an opportunity, when Pulci and Boiardo might have met).

Sept. 1473 - A quarrel between Reggio and Pio of Carpi on the water supply in the canal.

1474 - Boiardo's aunt Taddea and her brother are very unhappy that Boiardo had sided with Reggio. Armed forces are used to drive his aunt's soldiers away. A plot to poison Matteo Maria came to light. Evidence was obtained and the plot was presented to Duke Ercole.
While Count Marco Pio was put under arrest, the Countess was not put to account, although it was known that she was her brother's accomplice. After some appeals, Matteo Maria and the Duke of Ferrara mitigated punishment to banishment, which was also remitted.
Duke Ercole offered to give Matteo Maria double the size of territory if Matteo Maria would relinquish Scandiano ... Matteo Maria declined.

1475 - Boiardo and his cousin Giovanni divide their inheritance; Giovanni chooses Arceto, Casalgrande, Dinazzano with Salvaterra and Montebabbio. Matteo Maria gets Scandiano, Gesso and Torricella.
After the poison attempt MM Boiardo lived from 1475 to 1478 (with his family ?) at Ferrara, filling a position at the court of Ercole. Countess Cornelia Taddeo and her son made themselves disagreeable to Reggio and still disputed the water supply. Boiardo translated Herodotus from the Greek (of which he knew a little but not enough for his task) and wrote an abbreviation of the Golden Ass of Apuleius.
Image

https://books.google.de/books?id=GdB3LN ... do&f=false

The robbery of "after 1494" had long-lasting results. The whole Boiardo family suffered from this long years, finally finished with a murder in the 1530s. I just have to look it up ... there it is: 1499, when Camillo, the oldest Boiardo son died: ... hm, the link is lost ... .-) ... for the moment. Anyway, one needs to find a good link and reports to the complete story. I had it once, but where?

******************

To the German text passage (2 posts before): it's said, that Pier Antonio Viti (the author) was the older brother and he urged the younger brother Timoteo (* 1469, the painter) to come to Bologna (I remember, that the birth year wasn't known for Pier Antonio). Timoteo was a pupil of Santi, who was father and teacher to Raffael. When Santi died, then Timoteo became Raffael's master for some time (at least, it's assumed by some). Later Raffael was the master of Timoteo.

Raffael and Timoteo Santi at the "School of Athens":
Image


Santi: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Santi
Timoteo: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timoteo_Viti
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#38
SteveM wrote: *Renier reports on this record of Vernaccio and mentions that Vernaccio's biographical notes are in Pesaro, Biblioteca Oliveriana, ms.1145. I have searched the online Oliveriana database with manuscript number and "Vernaccio" and cannot find any current record of it. I am presuming it is Padre Pier Girolamo Vernaccia, 1676-1742, of the Pious School, pastor of the arcade o the Colina Metaurica,author of the manuscripts Trees of the families of the illustrious men of Urbino and its justifications formed by Pier Girolamo Vernaccia (1706); Collection historical and other writings with which you justify genealogical trees of illustrious families of Urbino, which were formed by Pier Girolamo Vernaccia (1706), and Lives of some illustrious men of Urbino and memories of families of the same city by the Pier Girolamo Vernaccia, 1720.
A great deal of his material has been digitized, but there is a great deal to go through to find the referred to reference (too much). I believe it may be a part of that collected/copied by Rossi, Urbino 28 (but am not sure).

http://sba.uniurb.it:8080/Biblioteca%20 ... a-digitale
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#40
In an older post of mine at aeclectic I discovered this snippet, indirectly referring to the Boiardo poem.

Thread title: Luigi Pulci (and Boiardo) (and Tarot)
part of second post (# 2)
http://tarotforum.net/showthread.php?t= ... iardo+1535
21-12-2007
...

The second is "Driadeo d'Amore" ... 18 letters from women to men, starting with a letter of Lucrezia Donati to Lorenzo de Medici (Lorenzo had a favor
for this Lucrezia Donati).

The text is made following a classical idea of Ovid in his "Heroides":

Ovid: Heroides
----------
15 letters
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heroides
6 double letters (letter exchanges).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_Her ... Collection
Text
http://www.tonykline.co.uk/klineasheroides.htm
The Heroides (Her.) (“The Heroines”), or Epistulae Heroidum (“Letters of Heroines”), are a collection of fifteen epistolary poems composed by Ovid in Latin elegiac couplets, and presented as though written by a selection of aggrieved heroines of Greek and Roman mythology, in address to their heroic lovers who have in some way mistreated, neglected, or abandoned them.
Front matter of Boswell's copy of the 1732 edition of the Heroides, edited by Peter Burmann. Note the title "Heroides sive Epistolae", “The Heroides or the Letters.

A further set of six poems—widely known as the Double Heroides and numbered 16 to 21 in modern scholarly editions—follows these individual letters and presents three separate exchanges of paired epistles: one each from a heroic lover to his absent beloved and from the heroine in return
It was not possible (for the moment) to get the names of the female writers in Luca Pulci's work.

But: The names in Ovid's work often refer to persons, which also appear in Boiardo's Tarocchi poem. The names are mentioned in the Wikipedia-articles.

Although this is generally given to Luca Pulci, occasionally one meets the opinion, that Luigi Pulci contributed.

The 3rd is about a tournament for Lorenzo di Medici, organized in February 1469.
Again it is discussed, if Luigi or Luca was the author.

Actually Luca Pulci, the elder brother of Luigi, was a man with trouble, which resulted from his activities as a banker, mostly in Rome. In 1465/66 Luigi Pulci himself became a fugitive from Florence to avoid difficulties with persons who wanted money from his brother. Luca went back to Rome after 1465, but finally died in a prison cause of his money difficulties.
Luigi got trouble himself cause of literary opinions and discussions in Florence 1474-1476, mainly due to the influence of Marsilio Ficino (Pulci called in the following years "sbandito"). Actually it might be, that he had difficulties to publish with his own name. It's possible, that he used the name of his brother, so that all these debates about the "true authorship" of these works depend on the conditions of Luigi Pulci's trouble after 1476.
Things seem to have become better with 1479, after the situation in Milan was settled (Ludovico Sforza became then leader of the state; Luigi Pulci was with Roberto Sanseverino and Roberto had militaric and political success in Milan together with Ludovico Sforza in 1479).

#####

For the research of Tarot interesting: The relation between Boiardo Tarocchi and Ovid's Heroides.

Btw.: 15 singular letter and 6 double letters (as in Heroides) ... this mathematical structure seems to indicate, that Ovid structured his work according to the throws of two dices: 15 simple possibilities + 6 double possibilities 1-1, 2-2, 3-3, 4-4, 5-5, 6-6

Naturally this has some similarity to the Major Arcana structure.
Generally Boiardo had an orientation towards Luigi Pulci, cause Pulci had chosen the Orlando theme before Boiardo started his major work to the same hero. Ercole d'Este had bought the 23-chapters version of Pulci's Morgante in 1474, I remember.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

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