Re: The Devil

#32
Thanks Debra, I love Taschen books. They're usually very high quality at a very good price.
The Tarot will lose all its vitality for one who allows himself to be side-tracked by its pedantry. - Aleister Crowley

Re: The Devil

#33
Firemaiden has posted an interesting 'devil' like image over on AT:

Image


British Museum Entry


Object types
print study (scope note | all objects)
drawing (scope note | all objects)

Materials
paper (all objects)
Techniques
drawn (scope note | all objects)
Production person
Drawn by John White (biographical details | all objects)
Date
1585-1593
Schools /Styles
British (all objects)
American (scope note | all objects)
Description
A Pictish warrior holding a human head; nude, body stained and painted with birds, animals and serpents carrying shield and man's head, with large curved sword
Watercolour touched with bodycolour and white over graphite
-----

"A, late-16th century, vision of a Pictish warrior (clearly based on Herodian's description of the “barbarians” of Caledonia) by John White. The overall blue tinting of the body is inspired by a remark made by Julius Caesar, who had spent a few weeks in the south-eastern corner of Britain in 55BC and 54BC: “All the Britons, without exception, stain themselves with woad, which produces a blueish tint; and this gives them a wild look in battle."

http://www.dot-domesday.me.uk/picts.htm
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: The Devil

#34
A repost of the image I found with similarities to the Cary Sheet Devil:

Image


Title of Work: Book of Hours
Illustrator: Master of the Brussels Initials
Production: France (Paris), circa 1407
Description: (Whole folio) A scene in Hell; historiated initial and decorated border with foliage, figures and birds. From the Penitential Psalms and Litany.
The Tarot will lose all its vitality for one who allows himself to be side-tracked by its pedantry. - Aleister Crowley

Re: The Devil

#35
In the search for these Moresco dancers in Spain and Catalonia- I came upon this
http://diabloenelarte.blogspot.co.nz/20 ... chive.html
Apparently the Spanish thought two things in medieval times about the Devil.
1. In Spain, 'el hombre del saco' is usually depicted as a mean and impossibly ugly and skinny old man who eats the misbehaving children he collects.
2. This became a corruption of Saint Christopher, because he did not have a burial place or relics and it was thought he was a Canaanite from Antioch. (Canine) and so they made him Dog headed. Makes sense lol.
So in the end we have skinny dark or red man from alien place with basket on his back, that kind of looks like a Bulldog with horns.
Kind of puts the Cary- Yale as Spanish influenced if that is correct.
That print from a missal has the dog headed Saint Christopher is in the middle -almost last image on page.

~Lorredan
http://diabloenelarte.blogspot.co.nz/20 ... illus.html
The Universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.
Eden Phillpotts

Re: The Devil

#37
Sorry Robert- I went back and it had all changed.
Also sorry about the wrong thread.
A big oops Mea culpa.
The Universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.
Eden Phillpotts

Re: The Devil

#38
Robert re: the book of hours --

have we discussed it before? I seem to recall mentioning that though the patron was french, the artist was Italian? Was it this one?

(As courts integrated the families often used the same artists from different regions -- which is in part what led to the uniformity of a wide spread late gothic style -- one which can complicate style and content as a means of identifying geographic locale.)

edited to add: oops no, I see it is by the master of brussels... must be another one I was thinking of.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: The Devil

#39
Lorredan wrote:Sorry Robert- I went back and it had all changed.
I found this one, is it the one you intended?

Image
The Tarot will lose all its vitality for one who allows himself to be side-tracked by its pedantry. - Aleister Crowley

Re: The Devil

#40
SteveM wrote:Robert re: the book of hours --

have we discussed it before? I seem to recall mentioning that though the patron was french, the artist was Italian? Was it this one?

(As courts integrated the families often used the same artists from different regions -- which is in part what led to the uniformity of a wide spread late gothic style -- one which can complicate style and content as a means of identifying geographic locale.)
It's the one that I posted way back on the AT thread years ago. We might have discovered it was Italian, but I don't remember that. It's clear that the basket on the back was pretty common, Michael Hurst has sent me some additional items, so it seems unlikely we will determine much from it as far as origin is concerned.
The Tarot will lose all its vitality for one who allows himself to be side-tracked by its pedantry. - Aleister Crowley

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

cron