Re: The Chariot

#21
From this thread - fabulous! viewtopic.php?f=12&t=31
Ross G. R. Caldwell wrote:Don't forget the Chariot discovered in the late 80s and now in the Musée Français de la Carte à Jouer in Issy-les-Moulineaux (referred to as the "Issy Chariot") -
http://www.issy.com/musee/ct3.htm

Image


Thierry Depaulis identified this card as belonging with the Warsaw museum cards (Kaplan I, 109), and dates to about 1450, Ferrara.

It is much less overtly "mythological", unless the two different colored horses represent that they have different "natures".

There is a canopy over her head. It's tempting to consider it a "marriage" chariot, with all the symbolism that implies (after love, comes marriage, hence chastity/modesty, good qualities in a wife). For what it's worth, Bianca Maria was married in red, "her zodiacal color" (as noted by Pizzagalli - BM was an Aries. Leonello is also noted as considering the color of the planet for the day of the week in choosing his clothing, so symbolism like this might really be present). I don't know if this is Bianca Maria, but the clothing is outstandingly red.

She's holding an orb and a sword, in order to say "Be nice to me or I'll cut your balls off."

It's hard to interpret the gestures of the four girls around the main figure on the chariot.

Ross
He's not the Messiah, he's a very naughty boy...

Re: The Chariot

#22
In support of Ross's interpretation of the BAR charioteer's helmet as being a war helmet and not Mercury's, here is a "Triumph of Mars" very close to the BAR's imagery, from G. Mariani Canova's article "The Italian Renaissance Miniature," on p. 21 of The Painted Page, ed. by Alexander. In a paragraph devoted to Florentine miniatures of the 1440's and 1450's, Canova says of it:
A highly skilled painter of the same period [she has just been discussing a 1458 Pliny], Francesco Pesellino, added superb full-page miniatures, such as that of Mars in a chariot (fig. 11), to a De bello punico by Silius Italicus, which is also decorated with a bianchi girari border.
By "bianchi girari," she has previously explained, she means "the white vine-stem motif typical of Tuscan manuscripts of the 11th and 12th centuries." Her footnote, p. 33, says that the manuscript is "Venice, Biblioteca Marciana, Lat. XII, 68 (=4519)." In the sentence following the one quoted above, she talks about "illuminations of copies of Petrarch's Trionfi by Francesco d'Antonio del Chierico of 1456 and by Apollonio di Giovanni."

Image

Re: The Chariot

#23
Eearler references to Carroccio, the ancestor of the Chariot Triumph



[1] Giacomo da Lentini, c. 1230/50 (tosc.), 6.38, pag. 91: guardate a Pisa di gran canoscenza, / che teme 'ntenza - d'orgogliosa gente: / sì lungiamente - orgoglio m'à in bailia, / Melan'a lo carroccio par che sia...

[2] Serventese Lambertazzi, XIII u.v. (bologn.), 21, pag. 847: Alora doe parti se començò a fare, / Germie' e Lambertaci se fe' chiamare, / e queste començòno a ingrossare / fortemente: / sì che 'l caroço tolseno de presente, / in su la piaça de la cità valente / lo menòno ambe le parti comunalmente / cum gran forore.

[3] Cronica fior., XIII ex., pag. 123.36: MCCXXVIIJ anni, alla singnoria di messer Andrea Iacopi de Perugia i Fiorentini andarono, popolo e chavalieri, col carroccio, sopra la città di Pistoia, e le borgora infino alle mura, intorno intorno, tutto guasstaro; e disfecero Monte Fiore, una bella torre, e lo castello di Carmignano.

[4] Cronichetta lucchese (1164-1260), XIII/XIV, pag. 249.22: e lo imperatore Federigo fece oste a Melano, come fue la levata da Melano sì funno isconfitti e vinto lo charroccio di Melano...

[5] Stat. pis., 1330 (2), cap. 171, pag. 639.33: Dichiariamo che, conciò sia cosa che la campana del carroccio sia di sì picciulo suono, che per tutta la cità udire non si puote; che infin' ad tanto che la campana grossa la quale si de' ordinare et ponere sopra 'l palagio del Capitano, quine sarà ordinata et posta, se cazo addiverrà che lo Capitano facesse sonare la dicta campana del carroccio...

[6] Giovanni Villani (ed. Porta), a. 1348 (fior.), L. 7, cap. 75, vol. 1, pag. 369.24: E nota che 'l carroccio che menava il Comune e popolo di Firenze era uno carro in su quattro ruote tutto dipinto vermiglio, e aveavi su commesse due grandi antenne vermiglie, in su le quali stava e ventilava il grande stendale dell'arme del Comune...

[7] Marchionne, Cronaca fior., 1378-85, Rubr. 72 tit., pag. 31.30: Come i Fiorentini rifeciono oste di nuovo e col carroccio andarono sopra a Sanesi, e disfeciono il bagno Avignone.

[8] A. Pucci, Centiloquio, a. 1388 (fior.), c. 5, terz. 47, vol. 1, pag. 56: Nel dugentoventotto e mille sento, / che i Fiorentini andar sopra Pistoia, / col Carroccio, e con grande assembramento, / perocch' a Montemurlo davan noia...

[9] Anonimo Rom., Cronica, XIV, cap. 5, pag. 22.11:Vinti milia perzone pericolaro nella rotta. Lo carroccio tame a Bologna tornao.
When a man has a theory // Can’t keep his mind on nothing else (By Ross)

Re: The Chariot

#24
[6] Giovanni Villani (ed. Porta), a. 1348 (fior.), L. 7, cap. 75, vol. 1, pag. 369.24: E nota che 'l carroccio che menava il Comune e popolo di Firenze era uno carro in su quattro ruote tutto dipinto vermiglio, e aveavi su commesse due grandi antenne vermiglie, in su le quali stava e ventilava il grande stendale dell'arme del Comune...
http://books.google.es/books?id=vC8QAAA ... &q&f=false

Edit:
[1] Giacomo da Lentini, c. 1230/50 (tosc.), 6.38, pag. 91: guardate a Pisa di gran canoscenza, / che teme 'ntenza - d'orgogliosa gente: / sì lungiamente - orgoglio m'à in bailia, / Melan'a lo carroccio par che sia...

E voi che sete senza percepenza,

como Florenza - che d'orgoglio sente,

guardate a Pisa di gran canoscenza,

che teme 'ntenza - d'orgogliosa gente:

sì lungiamente - orgoglio m'à in bailia,

Melan'a lo carroccio par che sia;

e si si tarda l'umile speranza,

chi sofra vince e scompra ogni tardanza.


http://www.italica.rai.it/index.php?cat ... o_ii_prima
When a man has a theory // Can’t keep his mind on nothing else (By Ross)

Re: The Chariot

#25
[6] Giovanni Villani (ed. Porta), a. 1348 (fior.), L. 7, cap. 75, vol. 1, pag. 369.24: E nota che 'l carroccio che menava il Comune e popolo di Firenze era uno carro in su quattro ruote tutto dipinto vermiglio, e aveavi su commesse due grandi antenne vermiglie, in su le quali stava e ventilava il grande stendale dell'arme del Comune...
That is, the carroccio of Firence. Its red and have two red poles, and its pulled by two oxen red... Where we have seen a red chariot?

Ah, yes, now I remember! :)
06_carlosvi_elcarro.jpg
06_carlosvi_elcarro.jpg (43.75 KiB) Viewed 5294 times
When a man has a theory // Can’t keep his mind on nothing else (By Ross)

Re: The Chariot

#26
mmfilesi wrote:
[6] Giovanni Villani (ed. Porta), a. 1348 (fior.), L. 7, cap. 75, vol. 1, pag. 369.24: E nota che 'l carroccio che menava il Comune e popolo di Firenze era uno carro in su quattro ruote tutto dipinto vermiglio, e aveavi su commesse due grandi antenne vermiglie, in su le quali stava e ventilava il grande stendale dell'arme del Comune...
That is, the carroccio of Firence. Its red and have two red poles, and its pulled by two oxen red... Where we have seen a red chariot?

Ah, yes, now I remember! :)
06_carlosvi_elcarro.jpg
Interesting observation, though it are horses, not oxen ... where do you see the "oxen" in the text? My poor Italian ... the "antenne" ?
1348 is a little early ... but, well, it might had become a tradition to get a red chariot as sign of the city, expressing great wealth, cause red was an expensive color.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: The Chariot

#27
Thanks, Huck.
Interesting observation, though it are horses, not oxen
Sure. In a real chariot as heavy as the carroccio, oxen are needed to throw. But, in pictor-chario we can put a horse, or Pegasus, or swans, which are more elegant. :)

... where do you see the "oxen" in the text?
bueyes.gif
bueyes.gif (23.17 KiB) Viewed 5293 times
My poor Italian ... the "antenne" ?


They are Standards (flags)
1348 is a little early ...
:) I know. But if we understand the chariot, we must understand the carroccio. The carroccio is the emblem of the city. It leads to the battle, is the symbol of military glory of the city, past and future.
When a man has a theory // Can’t keep his mind on nothing else (By Ross)

Re: The Chariot

#29
The Medici changed their heraldic in May 1465 from 7 palle to 6 palle, one palle then including the French Lille.

Earlier there were other changes of the number ... they were reduced with the time.

The action was caused by French king Louis XI and his problems with Burgundy and not satisfied nobility, which lead to a war and the Battle of Montlhéry in the same year at 16th of July. The financial help of the Medici - which naturally accompanied the change in the heraldic - caused that a lot of Florentians found a new home in Lyon (new capital of France) and on long sight it caused two Medici princesses becoming Queens of France in 16th century.
Sforza was also engaged, who sent Galeazzo Maria with some military.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bataille_de_Montlh%C3%A9ry

Nonetheless Louis needed some luck to survive the crisis.

According the Trionfi.com theories the Charles VI. deck was made ca. 1463, likely for Lorenzo's 14th birthday, 1.1.1463, still in the 7-palle time. When the France-Medici agreement was made in early May 1465, Lorenzo di Medici likely already had started a journey through various Italian cities, which should lead him finally to Milan, where the bride entourage to Naples for Ippolita Sforza gathered with some connected festivities, diplomatic talkings etc.. Lorenzo had to accompany the entourage till Florence, where the entourage intended to participate in the Giovanni festivities (24th of June).
The news about the 6-palle-change (and the connected political messages) reached Lorenzo likely during the journey.
According the Trionfi.com theories Lorenzo got the idea to present the 6 palle in 6 cards, which he intended to present to the Sforza (the six added cards in the Pierpont-Morgan-Bergamo Tarocchi). Possibly he used his stay in Ferrara for this activity (the stay took longer as expected, and Lorenzo's father, Pietro di Medici, wrote a demanding letter).

Well, somehow the 6 cards arrived in Milan ... with Sun + Moon + 2 cardinal virtues, which were in the Charles VI. but not in the 14 Bembo cards. And with a Star, which probably already had arrived in the Medici deck as a new card, when the Medici Chapel (with 3 holy kings, which presented sun-moon-star) was opened ca. 1464/65 and was celebrated with a triumphal march (a 6th of January 1465 seems logical).
And with a card with 2 putti carrying the picture of a city - identified as "World", but probably somehow indicating a French Lille in the new Medici shield.

**********

But thanks for this picture:

Image


For something like this I was looking for. And a picture from the Medici chapel (painted 1459-64 by Gozzoli) very precisely meets the spot.

********************

Just found an article announcement ...
Regulations for the Joust in Fifteenth-Century Europe: Francesco Sforza Visconti (1465) and John Tiptoft (1466)

Abstract
This article examines the role of the Sforzas and Viscontis in Milan who set up 'Regulations for the Joust' to be staged at a wedding in 1465. For the first time the text of the only copy preserved in the State Archives of Milan is translated into English. The travels of John Tiptoft in Italy are traced from 1458 to 1461 followed by the text of his 'Ordinances' of 1466 (Ashmoleian Ms no 763 version). Both regulations are compared in detail focusing on the quantification of performance, targets, and actions. Despite striking similarities it can only be stated that the Italians preceded the English by one year.
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/conten ... 557&db=all

with a connected Google snippet "Rules for the jousts which were staged in Milan in May 1465 on the occasion of .... delegation of eminent Italian scholars, such as Roberto Sanseverino from ...", which indicates, that the meeting 1465 had some importance for knight tournament rules.

This is an interesting detail, which I didn't know of. And it looks promising ...
Huck
http://trionfi.com

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