Re: Cary Sheet again

#101
SteveM wrote: "The first series shows a craftsman who drew largely from German sources (putting a St. John of the Master E. S. into the habit of the Libyan Sibyl).
(quote from papesse thread)

As the Italians used the Master E.S. engravings as models, lets have a few engravings by him:

Fool with Woman by Master E.S. c.1450/66 (With pattens!)
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Playing Card of Man with Coat of Arms by Master E.S. c. 1465. What is that on his back? He is already wearing a hat! Reminds me of the 'straw hat' on the VS magician :-?
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Playing card of King of Coat of Arms by Master E.S. c.1465
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Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Cary Sheet again

#102
Playing Card of Man with Coat of Arms by Master E.S. c. 1465. What is that on his back? He is already wearing a hat! Reminds me of the 'straw hat' on the VS magician :-?
Looks like it and he's had it nearly 20 years :-s Whatever, that's his working hat for the Sunshine.

Interesting those beehive or hills I am sure Huck has shown those cards in the Chess theory.

Love all these engraving models you are posting!
Sure makes Tarot look in part astrological.

~Lorredan
The Universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.
Eden Phillpotts

Re: Cary Sheet again

#103
Virtually the same as the 'Unter of Roses' is the Master of the Playing Cards 'Lesender Poet' :

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Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Cary Sheet again

#104
Poulaine in the Finiguerra/Baldini Children of the Planets / Venus:

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Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Cary Sheet again

#106
I think the musician's (drummer) is an example, though not one of the super long ones.

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I thought the lover maybe too, there seems to be pointy line extention of his shoe.

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They are from the Finiguerra school, in which we have an example already with Chassandra.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Cary Sheet again

#108
No pattens, but the d'Este bateleur's is pretty long and pointy too:

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Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Cary Sheet again

#109
Lorredan wrote: Do you mean to say there are some people who do not believe in the Monkey? Well I never. Maybe they need to be as blind as me and see things in inkblots and then use spectacles to confirm 8-|

~Lorredan
Catching up.... just want to confirm that I DO believe in The Monkey (just in case my somewhat cryptic/sarcastic? post was/is misunderstood...) :(|)

And IMHO Lorredan deserves a tarot medal for the Straw Hat discovery.

Pen
He's not the Messiah, he's a very naughty boy...

Re: Cary Sheet again

#110
Ah Thanks Pen! @};-

Now I had had a thought about these hats- especially the Turbaned Monkey.
A turban is an obscure oriental headdress- we know more about these days than in Medieval times.
It was first found mentioned at the end of the 14th Century in Spain, from the gifts given to a Jewish boy- a fine linen Tiraz Turband from India. It was a 'noble Crown' of a Caliph and ceremonial for a wedding. In India it would have been called a Pagri.
The English name derives from Turband, tolibant or tulipant, all variations of the flower tulip, suggested by the design of the folds. It is not a religious Turban or even a spiritual headdress- it is a civil one, a political one.
The clearest attitude I can find to the Caliph's Turban- more rightly considered the Sultan's Crown was from
Manual II Paleologos (1391-1425) -that the siege of Constantinople -1422 the city’s great statesmen was heard to say “Better the Sultan’s turban than the cardinal’s hat”.
It seems to me that a monkey in a turban is somewhat later than we are thinking. Still working on it- as that problem with the word Bateleur and the eagle that was named the same.
~Lorredan
The Universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.
Eden Phillpotts

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