Re: The "Charles VI" Tarot

#12
debra wrote:Don't the images in illuminated manuscripts often break the borders?
They probably do Debra, Michael has pointed out that the technique was not unusual for the time.

Nevertheless, I still find it interesting at least in comparison to other tarot cards. Perhaps I've been studying the Tarot de Marseille too long, and I'm so used to borders containing content, that the feature of content breaking the borders really struck me as something noticeable and worthy of attention. I guess it's just a feature that adds another layer of appreciation for me of this marvelous deck. I don't know what it is about this deck that strikes me as "extra special", but something about it does. It has an "ooomph" to it, that even over 500 years later still leaves me a bit breathless.
The Tarot will lose all its vitality for one who allows himself to be side-tracked by its pedantry. - Aleister Crowley

Re: The "Charles VI" Tarot

#13
Hello Robert and Dear Comrades ...
Surely Charles VI Deck is very beautifull and I allways keep it on my mind each time I "have a walk" at the Mr. Michael Hurst site.
With regard to the Fool card and his donkey ears I only found one similar example on Vieville deck.
With regard to the out of frame topic is very interesant what you bring to us attention Robert.
On the Tarot of Marseilles for example LE MAT is named but unumbered.
We give a name or have a name of someone or something that exist but may be is not present (on a physical sense ) so haven t a place.(That reinforcement for me again my "motto" that Tarot is an structure of LE MAT + the 21 others cards).
If have a place (number) one can link him with others cards for Tarot purpose/ I think on Pitagoras sentence that number is weight and measurement.
As we see on this deck The Fool is unnamed and unnumbered but I think his arms out of the frame show a link with I mentioned,I mean that for me he is out of the Tarot structure.
I know that the boys are also out,and many others cards as VI show the same out of frame.
I think that relate to the Universal Vision of the Man of that time.So he was unable to consider Life limited by physical structure.
They went on theirs thinking way from general to particular,from God/Universe to the Man.Afterall we are talking about barely 1400 so many years before the crest of the Renaissance I think.
Now comes to my mind Thomas Moro "Utopia" (1516).
Utopia = Outopos // No place,so out of frame (Universe frame)//Tarot structure.

Eugim
The Universe is like a Mamushka.

Re: The "Charles VI" Tarot

#14
EUGIM wrote:Hello Robert and Dear Comrades ...
Surely Charles VI Deck is very beautifull and I allways keep it on my mind each time I "have a walk" at the Mr. Michael Hurst site.
With regard to the Fool card and his donkey ears I only found one similar example on Vieville deck.
I think it was pretty common in the times, but as you point out, not often on tarot.

Even the Visconti-Sforza Tarot has similar ears on some of the characters on the Wheel of Fortune (to imply their foolishness):

Image


There is also the famous "Ship of Fools"... Das Narrenschiff . See some great images here :
http://info.lib.uh.edu/sca/digital/ship/toc.html

Some of my favorites...

Image


Image


Image


Image


Enjoy!
The Tarot will lose all its vitality for one who allows himself to be side-tracked by its pedantry. - Aleister Crowley

Re: The "Charles VI" Tarot

#15
Though not to do with the "Charles VI", I especially like this cross-road image posted above.

Image


It reminds me of the many such small saint or Christ stations at various cross-roads, with often at the back the image of a devil. Here, I presume the implication of the arm sticking out is not that of Christ, but rather of the Devil who hides behind the housing, pointing in the wrong direction that the Fool is likely to follow.
Image
&
Image
association.tarotstudies.org

Re: The "Charles VI" Tarot

#16
Re the Charles VI Fool, I find it interesting to compare with the Este Fool from the Cary-Yale collection, which is one of my favorite triumphs. I've never thought of the Fool's 'attendants as representing 'negative' forces, per se; but rather as the active, neutral (if not innocent) forces exposing the Fool's ecstatic, sheer 'nakedness'.
2Fools.jpg
Charles VI and Este Fools
Dai Leon
http://www.OriginsOfTheTarot.com

Re: The "Charles VI" Tarot

#17
It's an incredible image to behold with contemporary eyes!

Yet I recall that even as a child, it was not uncommon to see on country roads not that far out of Paris men relieving themselves quite openly should nature call. The naked form appears to have been far less hidden than is these days the case... and here, I see no more than children taunting the adult-child (or child-like adult).
Image
&
Image
association.tarotstudies.org

Re: The "Charles VI" Tarot

#18
Perhaps Venetian culture influenced the earlier Este triumph, associated with Ferrara. During the time of Tarot's early development, Ferrara (even though powerfully courted by Milan) remained in alignment with Venice, which had a famously pro-Dionysian culture. It is also of note that in lands east, from Mameluke Egypt to the remnants of Byzantium and Rumi-inspired Sufi Turkey, sexuality did not carry the stigma that it had in much of Europe.
Dai Leon
http://www.OriginsOfTheTarot.com

Re: The "Charles VI" Tarot

#19
We of course do not need to look only East for sexual mores quite different to those we are currently accustomed to, as the courts (and social norms) of Provence and Aquitaine (amongst others) testify. In fact, it seems that these were generally even more liberal than the Sufi-oriented Turks, who also maintained a prohibition on human imagery (though, like the Jewish prohibition of the times, was also known for being overlooked - as some Haggadah show).
Image
&
Image
association.tarotstudies.org

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

cron