Re: Pondering Upon Dante's Paradiso and Tarot

#11
It is thought that Paradiso relied on a much earlier Arabic story Kitab al- Miraj or the 'Book of Mohammads Ladder.'
In the second half of the 13th century, the book was translated into Latin (as Liber Scale Machometi) and Spanish, and soon thereafter (in 1264) into Old French. Its Islamic depictions are believed by some scholars to have been a major influence on Dante's 14th century masterpiece, the Divine Comedy.
The Paradiso is 9x3 in form, Mohammads Ladder 7x3.
Here is an english translation of the essential trip from Jerusalem to Heaven.
Then I entered Bait Al-Maqdis (Jerusalem) where the Prophets, peace be upon them, were assembled for me, and Jibrail brought me forward to lead them in prayer. Then I was taken up to the first heaven, where I saw Adam, peace be upon him. Then I was taken up to the second heaven where I saw the maternal cousins ‘Eisa and Yahya, peace be upon them. Then I was taken up to the third heaven where I saw Yusuf, peace be upon him. Then I was taken up to the fourth heaven where I saw Harun, peace be upon him. Then I was taken up to the fifth heaven where I saw Eidris, peace be upon him. Then I was taken up to the sixth heaven where I saw Musa, peace be upon him. Then I was taken up to the seventh heaven where I saw Ibrahim, peace be upon him. Then I was taken up above the seven heavens and we came to Sidrah Al-Muntaha and I was covered with fog. I fell down prostrate and it was said to me: ‘(Indeed) The day I created the heavens and the Earth, I enjoined upon you and your Ummah fifty prayers...
The thing I found interesting is the correlation between the 7x3 and Dice games. In the Book of Games commissioned by Alfonso X the illustrations show the spiritual/physical/astronomical influences on this 'sacred numbering.(Dice is only one part of the Book of Games 'Libro de los Juegos') The Pips on the Die add to 21.
Book of Games.jpg
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The Universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.
Eden Phillpotts

Re: Pondering Upon Dante's Paradiso and Tarot

#12
Lorredan wrote:It is thought that Paradiso relied on a much earlier Arabic story Kitab al- Miraj or the 'Book of Mohammads Ladder.'
In the second half of the 13th century, the book was translated into Latin (as Liber Scale Machometi) and Spanish, and soon thereafter (in 1264) into Old French. Its Islamic depictions are believed by some scholars to have been a major influence on Dante's 14th century masterpiece, the Divine Comedy.
The Paradiso is 9x3 in form, Mohammads Ladder 7x3.
The thing I found interesting is the correlation between the 7x3 and Dice games. In the Book of Games commissioned by Alfonso X the illustrations show the spiritual/physical/astronomical influences on this 'sacred numbering.(Dice is only one part of the Book of Games 'Libro de los Juegos') The Pips on the Die add to 21.
Book of Games.jpg
Damn Lorredan - nice find! I will explain my 7X3 Dante theory soon - still editing the draft of a long post. I already had one "comparable" for my theory which dates frrom 1444 and is oddly enough...Spanish!

But where did you get this reference to begin with "It is thought that Paradiso relied on a much earlier Arabic story Kitab al- Miraj or the 'Book of Mohammads Ladder'?

EDIT - found this in Wiki (fascinating):
Perhaps Asín Palacios is best remembered for his 1919 book, La Escatologia Musulmana en la Divina Comedia,[58][59][60] which suggests Islamic sources[61] for the memorable context and perspective used by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri (1265–1321) in his work La Divina Commedia.[62] Specifically, Asín compares the Muslim religious literature surrounding the night journey [al-'Isra wal-Mi'rag] of Muhammad (from Mecca to Jerusalem and thence up with the prophets through the seven heavens),[63][64][65][66] with Dante's story describing his spiritual journey in which he meets various inhabitants of the afterlife and records their fate. Accordingly, Asín (I) discusses in detail the above night journey in Muslim literature,[67] (II) compares it to episodes in the inferno,[68] the purgatorio,[69] and the paradiso[70] of La Divina Commedia, (III) investigates Muslim influence on corresponding Christian literature predating the poem,[71] and (IV) conjectures how Dante could have known directly of the Muslim literature in translation.[72] Asín remarks that notwithstanding these Muslim sources, Dante remains a luminous figure and his poem retains its exalted place in world literature.[73]

Asín's book inspired a wide and energetic reaction, both positive and negative, as well as further research and academic exchanges.[74][75][76] Eventually two scholars, an Italian and a Spaniard, independently uncovered an until-then buried Arabic source, the eleventh century Kitab al-Mi'raj [Book of the Ladder (or of the ascent)],[77][78] which describes Muhammad's night journey. This work was translated into Spanish as La Escala de Mahoma by a scribe (Abrahim Alfaquim) of Alfonso X el Sabio in 1264.[79] Information surfaced about another translation into Latin, Liber Scalae Machometi, which has been traced to the Italian milieu of the poet, Dante Alighieri.[80][81] It appears that Dante's mentor Brunetto Latini met the Latin translator of the Kitab al-Mi'raj while both were staying at the court of the Spanish king Alfonso X el Sabio in Castilla.[82][83][84] Although this missing link was not available to Asín, he had based his work on several similar accounts of Muhammad's ladder then circulating among the literary or pious Muslims of Al-Andalus.[85]
Many thanks,
Phaeded

Re: Pondering Upon Dante's Paradiso and Tarot

#13
Glad you found some extra info Phaeded.
I like making 'connections' or working out the 'Butterfly effect'. Sometimes I make 1+1 =2, more often I get outlandish results. I am not the scholar others are, and my interests are wandering within the sphere of Tarot.
Example: I collect connection type books and on my travels in Egypt I bought a wonderful book on illuminations of Arabic sources. I see that Ibn'Arabi was in Mamluk Cairo...I buy book by Alexander D. Knysh who wrote about Ibn'Arabi. The sources within the book tell me about Alphonso X's book of Games, which I remembered Huck talking about years ago on Aeclectic. I then look at Dice.....and see what may have been talked about....and I see this..
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I have wondered why, if pairs, the Popess was next to the Empress. Dice faces make this somewhat understandable.
Now I wonder, if that is true, why Card 1 the Bateleur(who has dice on the table) would be paired with Card 6 Lovers. The choice between Vice and Virtue? I have not yet fully decided on this connection.
Now I come to your comments in other threads about Soldiers. This makes sense to me.
One of the reasons that dice were forbidden on Sundays, was that groups of Soldiers i.e Condotterie guards(and I guess locals) would be outside the church playing Dice games, throwing the die against the walls of the Church. The noise of the constant clicking and jingling of antes, upset the Cardinals, who played dice themselves as well as cards. So Lets Ban 'em! On Sundays especially- where we are busy talking.
~Lorredan
The Universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.
Eden Phillpotts

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