Re: Mozart, Tarot, Isis, and Ercole d'Este

#51
German lists probably make Magic Flute earlier because it has a lower Kochel number (by 1) than Clemenza di Tito. Well, that was Kochel's decision. Mozart wrote at least three-fourths of Magic Flute, then was interrupted from mid-July through August doing Clemenza, conducting its premiere in Prague on September 6. Then he finished Flute (the overture for sure, which he always did last) and conducted its premier on Sept. 30. Even German biographers agree with this much (I am getting the dates from Hildesheimer English translation p. 395). Maynard Solomon, though not German, says, "He put the finishing touches on Die Zauberflote by 28 September" (Mozart: A Life, 1995, p. 487).

On thing seems clear: When Mozart started Flute, he probably thought it was to be his 21st opera, as he started it c. March 1791, considerably before he had the deal for Clemenza--unless it was in the works a long time before anyone thinks it was.

Re: Mozart, Tarot, Isis, and Ercole d'Este

#52
mikeh wrote:German lists probably make Magic Flute earlier because it has a lower Kochel number (by 1) than Clemenza di Tito. Well, that was Kochel's decision. Mozart wrote at least three-fourths of Magic Flute, then was interrupted from mid-July through August doing Clemenza, conducting its premiere in Prague on September 6. Then he finished Flute (the overture for sure, which he always did last) and conducted its premier on Sept. 30. Even German biographers agree with this much (I am getting the dates from Hildesheimer English translation p. 395). Maynard Solomon, though not German, says, "He put the finishing touches on Die Zauberflote by 28 September" (Mozart: A Life, 1995, p. 487).

On thing seems clear: When Mozart started Flute, he probably thought it was to be his 21st opera, as he started it c. March 1791, considerably before he had the deal for Clemenza--unless it was in the works a long time before anyone thinks it was.
Well, perhaps somebody had the idea, that it might have been the 22th.

Schikaneder became freemason in 1491 (? before or after Zauberflöte ?), Mozart in 1484. Actually Schikaneder made the Libretti, at least this is the told version.

Schikaneder took the role of Papageno himself.

0. A snake hunts Tamino. Tamino is full of fear. The Fool of Tarot is hunted by a dog.

1. Papageno has the scene of the Vogelfänger. As we already saw, he has it with Mercury. Pagat is the Austrian word for the Tarot card. Pa-pa-pa-Geno.

2. Pamina enters the opera as a "picture". Tamino falls in love about the picture. The "virgin". Papessa. Pamina. Papessa.

3. The Queen of the night has her song. Queen is something like Empress.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Mozart, Tarot, Isis, and Ercole d'Este

#53
Shikaneder became a Mason in Regensburg 1788. Van den Berk says (p. 368) "We know his letter of application, dated July 4, 1788." After quoting from the letter, van den Berk adds (p. 369), "However, al;most a year later Shikaneder receives a letter from the Lodge, dated June 4th, 1789, barring him from the Lodge for six months, probably because he became the talk of Regensburg in connection with two love affairs he was involved in simultaneously, one of which concerned 'a lady of substance.'" He left for Vienna the same month. Providentially, his ex-wife's husband had died, and she needed help running their theater.

For myself, after the first scene I would identify the Fool with Papageno rather than Tamino because of his personality. Also, the 7 feathers on his head, in his original costume, make the link to Giotto's Folly and the Fool's headgear. Plus he has a pack on his back, like the Fool's bundle, and wanders the forest. His type was already delineated in Shikaneder'se Stein der Weisen, in the character Lubano (who is turned into a stag, with horns, while his wife, who frequently quarrels with him, is turned into a cat). Papageno doesn't have any magic until the Queen gives him a glockenspiel, not much like the tarot Magician with his wand (although the hammer might count). Even then he forgets that it's magical. The Three Ladies are the first magicians in the opera; their javelins must be magical to kill the snake so easily, and then there's the bit about the padlock they magically put on Papageno. Later Tamino has his flute, visually parallel to the magician's wand.

Also, the Queen is first spoken of quite early on by Papageno. Since she is the dispenser of magic, as well as the former High Priest's wife, she is a candidate for Popess. Pamina, introduced in Tamino's song, is a candidate for Empress-to-be. In alchemical sequences, to which the opera makes numerous references (hence van den Berk's title, Magic Flute: alchemical opera), the pair wear small crowns, like dukes', at the beginning and become Emperors and Empresses at the end. In the Marseille tarot, the Popess looks older than the Empress. Sarastro is then the Pope.

However I can also see how it could be the reverse, with Pamina as the Popess-to-be (and Tamino the Pope-to-be). And there is indeed a parallel between Tamino/snake and Fool/animal. Papageno is indeed related to Pagad, and he is certainly a magical character. So there are different ways of making the parallels to tarot. These can no doubt be found through the trump sequence. I have already suggested one way of continuing the parallels in my first post on this thread.

Re: Mozart, Tarot, Isis, and Ercole d'Este

#54
mikeh wrote:Shikaneder became a Mason in Regensburg 1788. Van den Berk says (p. 368) "We know his letter of application, dated July 4, 1788." After quoting from the letter, van den Berk adds (p. 369), "However, al;most a year later Shikaneder receives a letter from the Lodge, dated June 4th, 1789, barring him from the Lodge for six months, probably because he became the talk of Regensburg in connection with two love affairs he was involved in simultaneously, one of which concerned 'a lady of substance.'" He left for Vienna the same month. Providentially, his ex-wife's husband had died, and she needed help running their theater.

For myself, after the first scene I would identify the Fool with Papageno rather than Tamino because of his personality. Also, the 7 feathers on his head, in his original costume, make the link to Giotto's Folly and the Fool's headgear. Plus he has a pack on his back, like the Fool's bundle, and wanders the forest. His type was already delineated in Shikaneder'se Stein der Weisen, in the character Lubano (who is turned into a stag, with horns, while his wife, who frequently quarrels with him, is turned into a cat). Papageno doesn't have any magic until the Queen gives him a glockenspiel, not much like the tarot Magician with his wand (although the hammer might count). Even then he forgets that it's magical. The Three Ladies are the first magicians in the opera; their javelins must be magical to kill the snake so easily, and then there's the bit about the padlock they magically put on Papageno. Later Tamino has his flute, visually parallel to the magician's wand.

Also, the Queen is first spoken of quite early on by Papageno. Since she is the dispenser of magic, as well as the former High Priest's wife, she is a candidate for Popess. Pamina, introduced in Tamino's song, is a candidate for Empress-to-be. In alchemical sequences, to which the opera makes numerous references (hence van den Berk's title, Magic Flute: alchemical opera), the pair wear small crowns, like dukes', at the beginning and become Emperors and Empresses at the end. In the Marseille tarot, the Popess looks older than the Empress. Sarastro is then the Pope.

However I can also see how it could be the reverse, with Pamina as the Popess-to-be (and Tamino the Pope-to-be). And there is indeed a parallel between Tamino/snake and Fool/animal. Papageno is indeed related to Pagad, and he is certainly a magical character. So there are different ways of making the parallels to tarot. These can no doubt be found through the trump sequence. I have already suggested one way of continuing the parallels in my first post on this thread.
... :-) ...
The first event of the play is, that the Tamino is hunted by the viper. What a poor hero. "Help! Help!" For fear he loses his conscience. The first event in the Tarot is the Fool.
The action of the 3 ladies is just accompanying. Tamino is the Fool. The three ladies just mitate the three ladies, who opened the other story of Tarot, which we know: Teofilo Folengo as Triperuno. Everything is threefold here.

Then Papageno appears and hunts birds. He isn't foolish, he works for his life. The second event of the Tarot is the Magician.
The third event is the picture of Pamina. Tamino starts to sing.

1st song: 3 Ladies (in place of Tamino, cause Tamino had taken a pause).
2nd song: Papageno himself
3rd song: Now Tamino, who attempts to become a hero in spite of his bad experiences with this role. But that only cause the picture.
4th song: the Queen, the empress, naturally the mother after the daughter.
5th song: Sarastro, the emperor, but he appears only in the description of others. Chaotic song of different persons. Quintett. The 3 boys appear and have also something to sing. The heroes-Fools embark on their journey. Both get a magical weapon, naturally something with music, it's an opera. Tamina is the prince and Papageno the servant.
6th song: The bad one, the pope. Pamina escapes. Pagageno, the hero, appears, and that makes the bad one to take his escape.
7th song, Love is the theme of Tarot at this position. Nothing to see from Tamino. Papageno is there and Papageno and Pamina (look, we nice the both fit together with the name Pa-Pa-geno and Pa-mina) discuss love and its problems and missing men and missing women. Where the both sing so nice together, Papageno is so stupid and talks of Tamino, although Pamino already had promised, that Papageno would get a wife. Or he talks first, and Pamina answers, that he gets also one ...

Actually it's so:

36:30 Bad man arrives (Pope)
38:30 Bad man gone ... 2 minutes pope - Love begins, this takes much longer, it's an opera
44:00 Pageneno and Pamina gone
44:00 Tamino appears with 3 boys, typically much later. He plays Hercules in the decision between viortue and, but Tamino has Natur (nature), Vernunft (reason) and Weisheit (Wisdom) wisdom. Twice the "Voice" (22th figure) calls him back, the 3rd door is allowed. Tamino needs damn much time, but he is so boring.
57:00 Tamino gone. Typically ... just before ...
57:00 Pageneno and Pamina arrives
58:00 bad man arrive (pope back)
59:00 Zaubermusik Papageno,
60:00 bad man gone (pope gone)
61:30 Sarastro on the CHARIOT (love gone)
Pamina declares her problem
65:30 Bad man with Tamino
67:00 Sarastro uses JUSTICE ( ... bastonade with 77 beats for bad man ... 77 is nearly 78


PAUSE
75:00 Fürstenschmalz ... well, they attempt to educate the Fürst ... who is this? Who is prince Tamino?

Maria Theresia lived till 1780 and ruled since 1740
Her son Joseph II ruled since 1765 till 1790. He had no living children. So his brother Leopold II followed. He had many children.
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_II._%28HRR%29
Marie Therese (1767–1827) ∞ 1787 Anton, König von Sachsen married 1787
Franz II. Joseph Karl (1768–1835), römischer und österreichischer Kaiser (already married)
∞ 1788 Elisabeth von Württemberg (1767–1790) 1st marriage 1788
∞ 1790 Maria Theresia von Neapel-Sizilien (1772–1807) 2nd marriage) 1790
∞ 1808 Maria Ludovika Beatrix von Österreich-Este (1787–1816)
∞ 1816 Karoline Auguste von Bayern (1792–1873)
Ferdinand III. (1769–1824), Großherzog der Toskana (already married)
∞ 1790 Maria Louisa von Neapel-Sizilien (1773−1802) 1st marriage 1790
∞ 1821 Maria Anna von Sachsen (1796–1865), Tochter des Maximilian von Sachsen (1759–1838)
Maria Anna (1770–1809), Äbtissin des Theresianischen Damenstiftes in Prag
Karl von Österreich-Teschen (1771–1847), Herzog von Teschen 20 years old, NOT married
∞ 1815 Henriette Alexandrine von Nassau-Weilburg (1797–1829)
Alexander Leopold (1772–1795), Palatin von Ungarn
Albrecht (1773–1774)
Maximilian (1774–1778)
Joseph Anton Johann von Österreich (1776–1847)
∞ 1799 Alexandra Pawlowna Romanowa (1783–1801)
∞ 1815 Hermine von Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym (1797–1817)
∞ 1819 Maria Dorothea von Württemberg (1797–1855)
Maria Klementine von Österreich (1777–1801) ∞ Franz I. (1777–1830), König von Sizilien
Anton Viktor von Österreich (1779–1835), Kurfürst von Köln
Maria Amalia (1780–1798)
Johann von Österreich (1782–1859) ∞ 1829 Anna Plochl (1804–1885)
Rainer Joseph von Österreich (1783–1853) ∞ 1820 Maria Elisabeth von Savoyen-Carignan (1800–1856)
Ludwig von Habsburg-Lothringen (1784–1864)
Rudolf von Österreich (1788–1831), Kardinalerzbischof von Olmütz
As far marriages are concerned, the society of Vienna had been in marriage ecstasy since 1787 (1787, 1788, 1790, 1790). As they could not think of the 2 oldest princes, they might have thought of the 3rd: Karl von Österreich, just 20 years ... I think, I saw it mentioned, that Tamino is 20 years old.

Image


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archduke_C ... of_Teschen
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_von_% ... ch-Teschen

And it seems, the Freemasons searched a sponsor.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Mozart, Tarot, Isis, and Ercole d'Este

#55
Hi, Huck. I was out of town for a few days. Yes, for the beginning of the play, as in the beginning fo the sequence, assuming Fool is zero, Tamino is the Fool, I don't disagree. I was thinking of a little later, when Papageno sings with his mouth locked up, he's the Fool, and also in the trials, when he declines to participate, he's like the card that never wins a trick but also never loses one, since magically it goes back to its original owner. Tamino over the course of the opera rises above his earlier level.

Papageno is also the Hanged Man, since he starts to hang himself.

And the Speaker is the Hermit, with his lantern in the darkness of the trials.

Wheel of Fortune (going up, going down), Strength, Temperance, and Death are all connected with the trials.

Monostatos is the Devil.

The Tower is the overthrow of Monostatos and the Queen by Sarastro.

That's enough for now.

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