Re: The "Mantegna": 1450's Bologna?

#61
Great finding, thanks (the medal).

My info to the text says, anonymous ca. 1410-1420, Vatican library, but the text appears to be from Albricus, called Albricus or Albericus Londonensis or Philosophicus, somehow 13th century.

http://books.google.com/books?id=YOISgW ... us&f=false

... here assumed to be possibly identical with Alexander Nequam.

Similar pictures appear as illustrations to the work of Evrart de Conty and his very large comment (ca. 1398) to an anonymous poem "echecs amoureux" (ca. 1370) in editions, from which the oldest surviving seems to be from 1467 (Burgund).

See our collection:
http://trionfi.com/0/j/d/book-echecs-2/
The figure on the medal, except for the wings, seems quite similar indeed, as though the "Mantegna" card had been a model, as to be sure they were in numerous places over the next decades. The artist made a few improvements: more majestic wings, and a suitable cloud for her to float on (to that extent like the Urbino image). I can't imagine that the medal was a model for the "Mantegna" image, because the cloud is a touch the "Mantegna" artist would probably not have been able to resist. As it is, he only gives Geometry a cloud, of a rather different sort, too. Are those balls inside the sphere the seven planets, or what? That part is different, too.
The clouds were typical for the second Urbino manuscript, as already discussed, and the author of the E-series only used them for Geometria. This manuscript is given with ca. 1470, what could mean much, but it seems probable (from my perspective), that the pictures arrived Urbino with Lazzarelli's other pictures and that not before end of 1474 and probably a little later. I would assume, that Lazzarelli's pictures had "clouds".

But Sweynheim probably already had pictures (possibly ready engravings), to this themes, as he also could offer ready engravings for the 4 cardinal virtues. So the e-series redaction decided partly for the Lazzarelli motifs and partly for the Sweynheim motifs. Although, this interpretation hampers with the condition, that most of the artes liberalis pictures are similar in gesture and attributes. Perhaps it is explained by the condition, that the duke Montefeltro himself couldn't interfere in the production of the Lazzarelli manuscript, which possibly was an indirect gift from the pope Sixtus, but found reason to have altered motifs for the other editions.
By these considerations we should face the condition, that Sixtus (or his nephew, the later Pope Julius II, who gave the commission to Pollaiuolo) for his personal graveyard monument took the liberal arts and virtues as motifs.



The top plates shows six virtues, not the artes liberales, which somehow are presented at the lower border (would be nice to know these pictures, if you find them). The virtues are sitting, similar to the artes liberales in the Urbino manuscript.

Sixtus had two sides, one the better and the other bad. His good side saw many buildings and positive activities in Rome, the bad side is representative for his eagerness to develop a mighty Riario/Rovere family. This connects to his 3 major nephews, from which the first great protege died by his many festivities in 1474, after which the other two, Girolamo (husband to Catherina Sforza) and the later pope Julius, competed on some even level with each other till ca. 1476/77, and then was following a preference for Girolamo's worldly interests, which led to murder in Florence in 1478 and to the Ferrarese war 1482-84 and to an increasing chaos in Rome.

When the later Julius commissioned the tomb of Sixtus, he naturally connected to the time, when he himself stood a at the brighter side of life, so the period of 1474-76. Then Julius had a close, somehow mysterious connection to Lorenzo Zane, whom he wished to become a cardinal, and when this didn't work as he considered, then Julius reacted remarking emotional and risking all and everything in a furious rage about this misfortune in a seemingly not so important matter. In his later time as pope he had been occasional comparable furious and emotional, so it might simply a reason of an unusual choleric temperament, but also it might well be, that the relation between Zane and Julius had a rather dark mystery, especially as Zane was then already known as a trouble maker.
Some time later Zane changed sides from Julius to Girolamo and Julius was accused of an murder attempt on Girolamo with Zane as a witness, who wasn't allowed to be punished himself. A very dark story, possibly only staged by Girolamo to cause Julius having bad credit at the side of Sixtus.

Nonetheless, at the tomb of Sixtus, commissioned ca. 1489 (that is one year after Girolamo was murdered in Forli), Julius presented Sixtus with virtues and artes liberales, motifs, which also appear in the Mantegna Tarocchi, which according Trionfi.com's theory was made ca. 1475 in the good phase of the relation between Julius and Sixtus.
In the conclave 1492 Julius became the French candidate and had some chances, but Borgia decided the matter by a lot of money.

The intellectual side of Sixtus IV:

Sixtus in the library
Image


Ground-plan of part of the Vatican Palace, shewing the building of Nicholas V., as arranged for library purposes by Sixtus IV., and its relation to the surrounding structures. From Letarouilly, Le Vatican, fol. Paris, 1882; as reproduced by M. Fabre.
Image

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26378/26 ... .htm#fig97

"Thanks to the care with which Platina set down his expenditure, we are able to follow step by step the gradual transformation of the rooms. His account-books, begun 30 June 1475, record, with a minuteness as rare as it is valuable, his transactions with the different artists and workmen whom he thought proper to employ. It was evidently intended that the library should be beautiful as well as useful, and some of the most celebrated artists of the day were set to work upon it."
Thanks to the care with which Platina set down his expenditure, we are able to follow step by step the gradual transformation of the rooms. His account-books[373], begun 30 June 1475, record, with a minuteness as rare as it is valuable, his transactions with the different artists and workmen whom he thought proper to employ. It was evidently intended that the library should be beautiful as well as useful, and some of the most celebrated artists of the day were set to work upon it.

The librarian prudently began in August, 1475, by increasing the light, and a new window was made "on the side next the court." It seems to have been impossible to get either workmen or materials in Rome; both were supplied from a distance. For the windows, glass, lead and solder were brought from Venice, and a German, called simply Hormannus, i.e. Hermann, was hired to glaze them. For the internal decoration two well-known Florentine artists—the brothers Ghirlandajo—were engaged, with[212] Melozzo da Forli, who was painting there in 1477[374]. In 1476 the principal entrance was decorated with special care. Marble was bought for the doorcase, and the door itself was studded with 95 bronze nails, which were gilt, as were also the ring and knocker, and the frame of trellised ironwork (cancellus), which hung within the outer door.

The building is entered from the Cortile del Papagallo[375] through a marble doorway (fig. 98, A) in the classical style surmounted by the arms of Sixtus IV. On the frieze are the words sixtus papa iiii. The doorcase is doubtless that made in 1476; but the door, with its gilt nails and other adornments, has disappeared. Within the doorway there has been a descent of three steps at least to the floor of the Library[376]. The four rooms of which it was once composed are now used as the Floreria or Garde-meuble of the Vatican Palace; a use to which they have probably been put ever since the new Library was built at the end of the sixteenth century.

The Latin Library, into which the door from the court opens directly, is a noble room, 58 ft. 9 in. long, 34 ft. 8 in. wide, and about 16 ft. high to the spring of the vault. In the centre is a square pier, which carries the four plain quadripartite vaults, probably of brick, covered with plaster. The room is at present lighted by two windows (B, C) in the north wall, and by another, of smaller size, above the door of entrance (A). That this latter window was inserted by Sixtus IV., is proved by the presence of his arms above it on a stone shield. This is probably the window "next the court" made in 1475. The windows in the north wall are about 8 ft. high by 5 ft. broad, and their sills are 7 ft. above the floor of the room. Further, there were two windows in the west wall (b, c) a little smaller than those in[213] the north wall, and placed at a much lower level, only a few feet above the floor. These were blocked when the Torre Borgia was built by Alexander VI. (1492-1503), but their position can still be easily made out. This room must have been admirably lighted in former days.

The room next to this, the Greek Library, is 28 ft. broad by 34 ft. 6 in. long. It is lighted by a window (fig. 98, D) in the north wall, of the same size as those of the Latin Library, and by another (ibid., E) a good deal smaller, opposite to it. This room was originally entered from the Latin Library by a door close to the north wall (d). But, in 1480[377], two large openings (e, f) were made in the partition-wall, either because the light was found to be deficient, or because it was thought best to throw the two rooms into one as far as possible. At some subsequent date the door (d) was blocked up, and the opening next to it (e) was carried down to the ground, so as to do duty as a door. The other opening (f), about 7 ft. 6 in. square, remains as constructed.
Image


The famous library picture with Platina, Sixtus, Girolamo, Giuliano (= Julius) and two other nephews.

Sixtus, walking with the time (the expanding printing press productions in 1475) showed scientific (university) interests.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: The "Mantegna": 1450's Bologna?

#62
Antonio del Pollaiuolo's final commissions were the papal tombs of Sixtus IV and his successor Innocent VIII. The huge bronze tomb of Sixtus IV occupied the artist and his workshop nine years after the pope's death in 1484. The recumbent pope, wearing tiara and pontifical vestments, is surrounded by reliefs representing the seven Virtues (Charity, Hope, Prudence, Fortitude, Faith, Temperance, and Justice). Below these, on the sides of the tomb, separated by acanthus consoles, are the ten Liberal Arts (Philosophy, Theology, Rhetoric, Grammar, Arithmetic, Astrology, Dialectic, Geometry, Music, and Perspective).

The portrait of Sixtus seems to emphasize the pope's hawk-like features and sagging flesh. The complex folds of the pope's vestments and the drapery of the allegorical figures are the sculptural counterpart of the drapery in the paintings of the Pollaiuolo brothers.
Instead of promised 7 virtues I see only places for 6, from which I can 4 positive realize: Fides, Spes, Prudentia, Temperantia (the lower both I can't identify, I would assume, that Iustitia is missing or somehow expressed in the other fields; perhaps at the top ?).

5 of the Artes, whose number is raised to 10 (as in the Mantegna Tarocchi), but in which according above description Perspective replaces Poesia, I found in the web:

http://www.corbisimages.com/Enlargement/DE004480.html
http://www.corbisimages.com/Enlargement/DE004481.html
http://www.corbisimages.com/Enlargement/DE004482.html
http://www.corbisimages.com/Enlargement/DE004483.html
http://www.corbisimages.com/Enlargement/DE004493.html
http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/p ... tus40.html
http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/p ... tus40.html
(possibly some of the links don't work)

There are big differences to the Mantegna Tarocchi style, more or less new figures.

The exchange from Poesy to Perspective might have a background in the raising discussion in this time about the circumstance, that painters had traditionally less value than writers or poets ... this was especially expressed by Giovanni Santi, painter in Urbino, father of Raffael. Santi, an independent merchant, made himself poetry and paintings.

Sixtus had close relations to Urbino and Montefeltro (one of his nephews married to the Montefeltro family), perhaps this relates to the change.

Santi made Muses in Urbino.

Image

http://www.repubblica.it/2009/04/sezion ... 009/9.html

It seems possible, that the impulse to have Muses in Urbino wandered with the Lazzarelli pictures. As in the case of the Sixtus-tomb figures, the figures are altered and refined considerably.
Possibly all in relation to the marriage agreement in late 1474 beteen Rovere-Riario family and Montefeltro.

***************

The tomb of Innocenz VIII (the follower of Sixtus IV) knew only 7 virtues, similar to those of Sixtus. This tomb was made by the same artist (Antonio Pollaiuolo).

Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: The "Mantegna": 1450's Bologna?

#63
In matters of the exchange of "Perspective (= Prospective) instead of Poetry" in the tomb of Sixtus the biography of

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melozzo_da_Forl%C3%AC

might be of interest, the painter of the Platina picture.

In the course of his life he changed locations between Rome and Urbino and got commissions from Sixtus and after 1484 further commissions from members of the Rovere family.
The mentioned Giovanni Santi (who made some texts for the rights of the painters) "seems to have been an assistant and friend of Melozzo da Forli".

Image


***********

Melozzo da Forli took influences from ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piero_della_Francesca

... Piero della Francesca. Piero wrote about perspective, "On Perspective for Painting (De Prospectiva Pingendi)". He wrote on this, when he worked in Urbino.

Leon Battista Albert was much earlier (1435) with this theme, but possibly Piero della Francesca had more influence on painters. Alberti used "De pictura" as title, Piero used "Prospectiva"in it, as we find it also in the Pallaiuolo tomb.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: The "Mantegna": 1450's Bologna?

#64
Huck wrote,
My info to the text says, anonymous ca. 1410-1420, Vatican library, but the text appears to be from Albricus, called Albricus or Albericus Londonensis or Philosophicus, somehow 13th century.

http://books.google.com/books?id=YOISgW ... us&f=false

... here assumed to be possibly identical with Alexander Nequam.
Thanks for the reference to Seznec which explains the history of Codex Lat. Reg. 1290. As I read Seznec, the part you posted is from the Libellus, which is by a later author than the Liber. The Liber is attributed to Albricus Londonensis, 13th century, possibly Alexander Nequam, but the Libellus remains anonymous and dating to 1400-1420. Unfortunately some of Seznec's explanation of the Libellus is omitted from Google's pages.

Thanks also for turning me on to Pollaiuolo's tombs for Sixtus IV and Innocent VIII. I found good reproductions of all the figures at my local library. They don't look very similar to the "Mantegna" ones, as they are all seated and with different-looking attributes. But one could go on all day about the influence of the "Mantegna" on Italian art in the decades following their appearance. Kristen Lippincott has an article on just that subject, "Mantegna's Tarocchi," Print Quarterly 3, 1986, pp. 357-360 (not on-line that I can find, but I could scan and post it). The examples I would like to see are the ones in Mantegna's tomb, which supposedly are clearly modeled on the "Mantegna."

Re: The "Mantegna": 1450's Bologna?

#66
Alison Wright's The Pollaiuolo Brothers, 2005, has an interesting section on the symbolism of Sixtus IV's tomb (pp. 378-387), with pictures. The relevant pages are in Google Books, fortunately, and pictures of many of the figures. The main precedent for the tomb is the tomb of Robert of Anjou, King of Naples, d. 1343, at Chiara, which also combined the virtues with the liberal arts (p. 379, omitted from the web version). The two paragraphs on p. 380 (included in the web version) from the middle of the first column to the middle of the second column give a good analysis of why 10 liberal arts and how Prospectiva fits into the project: It is used for theological/astrological purposes. Wright says that Prospectiva seems to be "taking a sighting along her astrolabe in a precise line to the sun of the Trinity, which is represented as the inspiration of Theologia (fig. 314)." Since fig. 314 is on a page not included in the web version of the book, here is Theologia:

Image

For the astrological import, she observes that
The fact that Prospectiva carries an oak branch apparently signifies that Sixtus too was guided by the stars and it is unlikely to be casual that the arm of her astrolabe is positioned in the zodiacal sign of Cancer. The epitaph gives Sixtus's precise age at death indicating that his date of birth must have been 21 July, just placing it within Cancer's planetary influence. Such a reference is consistent with the emphasis given to portents at Sixtus's birth in biographical works.
Only the last three of your links to pictures resulted in anything for me: Astrology (there called Astronomy) and Prospectiva. In Google's pages from Wright, we have Faith, Prudence, Fortitude (p. 363, with Arithmetica, Astrologia, and Dialectica on the side), Temperance,Justice (both p. 364), Rhetorica, Prospectiva (both 366), Grammatica, Geometria (both p. 367), Dialectica (p. 381), Arithmetica (p. 382), Astrologia (p. 383), Musica (p. 384), and Charity (p. 387). Below is Philosophia, which appears on the same page as Theologia, not reproduced by Google.

Image


Not in Wright that I can find is Hope. I can describe her from Ettlinger's reproduction in Antonio and Piero Pollaiuolo. She is the usual woman praying to a heavenly body (maybe the sun, as it is a circle rather than a point); here she is sitting.

Re: The "Mantegna": 1450's Bologna?

#67
Re-reading Lippincott's article "'Mantegne's Tarocchi'" (Print Quarterly 3, 1986, pp. 357ff), I see that she has only a few sentences about the influence of the "Mantegna," on p. 358. I might as well post them:
In particular, the tarocchi seem to have been especially important in initiating an iconographic tradition for the representation of the Muses. Prior to the appearance of the tarocchi, the Muses are very rarely depicted individually. Only three examples come to mind: the series illustrated in the Regia Carmina of Convenevole da Prato (see Vienna, ONV, ser. nov. 2639; London, BM, Royal 6, E. IX; and Florence BN, II.I.27), the cycle in the Badia at Fiesole, and those executed for Leonello and Borso d'Este for the villa at Belriguardo based on iconographic suggestions from Guarino da Verona. Following, and based directly on the tarocchi, however, are the cycles of Muses for the Tempietto at Urbino, the Cremonese cupola currently in the Victoria & Albert Museum, the frescoes of the Sala dell'Astronomia in the Castello Isolani in Minerbio, the cycle formerly in the Villa della Magliana, and the ceiling frescoes in the Palazzo Vitelli alla Cannoniera in Citta di Castello. Also mention should be made of the sixteenth-century model book based on the "Mantegna tarocchi' (Paris, Bibliotheque de l"arsenal, fr. 5066), in which the pictures are accompanied by short explanatory French verses, and the fifteenth-century French calendar manuscript (London BM, Add. 11866), where the lists of feast days are accompanied by illustrations of planetary gods, Virtues and Liberal Arts copied from the tarocchi deck.

Re: The "Mantegna": 1450's Bologna?

#68
mikeh wrote:Re-reading Lippincott's article "'Mantegne's Tarocchi'" (Print Quarterly 3, 1986, pp. 357ff), I see that she has only a few sentences about the influence of the "Mantegna," on p. 358. I might as well post them:
In particular, the tarocchi seem to have been especially important in initiating an iconographic tradition for the representation of the Muses. Prior to the appearance of the tarocchi, the Muses are very rarely depicted individually. Only three examples come to mind: the series illustrated in the Regia Carmina of Convenevole da Prato (see Vienna, ONV, ser. nov. 2639; London, BM, Royal 6, E. IX; and Florence BN, II.I.27), the cycle in the Badia at Fiesole, and those executed for Leonello and Borso d'Este for the villa at Belriguardo based on iconographic suggestions from Guarino da Verona. Following, and based directly on the tarocchi, however, are the cycles of Muses for the Tempietto at Urbino, the Cremonese cupola currently in the Victoria & Albert Museum, the frescoes of the Sala dell'Astronomia in the Castello Isolani in Minerbio, the cycle formerly in the Villa della Magliana, and the ceiling frescoes in the Palazzo Vitelli alla Cannoniera in Citta di Castello. Also mention should be made of the sixteenth-century model book based on the "Mantegna tarocchi' (Paris, Bibliotheque de l"arsenal, fr. 5066), in which the pictures are accompanied by short explanatory French verses, and the fifteenth-century French calendar manuscript (London BM, Add. 11866), where the lists of feast days are accompanied by illustrations of planetary gods, Virtues and Liberal Arts copied from the tarocchi deck.
But it sounds as a rather good work, as she presents a some influences, which I don't know:

Muses

1. Regia Carmina of Convenevole da Prato (see Vienna, ONV, ser. nov. 2639; London, BM, Royal 6, E. IX; and Florence BN, II.I.27) .... I can't locate the Muses pictures

Image

http://cultura.utet.it/cultura/catalogo ... =1447&s=15

2. cycle in the Badia at Fiesole
seems to be this place:

wiki: fiesole
The Badia or ancient cathedral of St. Romulus, built in 1028 by Bishop Jacopo Bavaro with materials taken from several older edifices, at the foot of the hill on which Fiesole stands, supposed to cover the site of the martyrdom of St. Romulus; it contains notable sculptures by Mino da Fiesole. The old cathedral became a Benedictine abbey, which passed into the hands of the regular canons of Lateran. It once possessed a valuable library, long since dispersed. The abbey was closed in 1778.
search negative, I found two other muses from Martin le Franc (1410 - 1461)
Image

Image

http://www.recorderhomepage.net/artm.html

3. frescoes of the Sala dell'Astronomia in the Castello Isolani in Minerbio

that looks interesting, though late ... somehow connected to Bologna and Visconti

Minerbio
20 km NE of Bologna, near location "Bentivoglio"

Castello Isolani
Image


Apollo
Image


Urania (with ball)
Image


??? stanza-di-marte ... see the Primo mobile typus
Image


Marte
Image


All from http://blogacrocette.over-blog.com/cate ... 89506.html

see also:
Image



Solo una piccola parte della Rocca è visitabile, e al suo interno si trovano quattro stanze affrescate da Amico Aspertini , di cui 3 su tre livelli della torretta di sinistra, ma ne sono visitabili, per motivi di sicurezza, solo due quella al piano inferiore della torretta e una attigua.
So the artist is given with "Amico Aspertini" and only a part of the Rocca was visitable.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amico_Aspertini

"The masterpiece of his mature years was the decoration of three rooms in the Rocca Isolani in Minerbio. His preparatory cartoons for the work are today kept in the British Museum in London." So it seems to have been made against the end of his life.
"Aspertini was also one of two artists chosen to decorate a triumphal arch for the entry into Bologna of Pope Clement VII and Emperor Charles V in 1529."

4. cycle formerly in the Villa della Magliana

http://www.villediroma.com/villapapalemagliana.htm

This seems to be an interesting story, as we find again persons connected to the Lazzarelli-hypothesis: ...

The building was initiated by Pope Sixtus in 1480, 8km distance from the center of Rome, on the Tiber - at the Road to Fiumicino / Built by Pope Innocent 8 (1484–1492. and Julius 2 - (1503–15). In this Villa Pope Leo X died - 1522. It was abandoned later ... (cause Sacco di Roma ?)

"Qui si apre il grande salone delle feste detto anche delle Muse, un vasto ambiente rettangolare che era anticamente decorato ad affresco e che conserva ancora un monumentale camino del tempo di Giulio II. Erano raffigurate alle pareti le Dieci Muse, ora collocate al Museo di Roma di Palazzo Braschi. "

One picture I found:
"Giovanni di Pietro detto lo Spagna, Euterpe, secondo decennio del XVI secolo, affresco staccato, Museo di Roma, Palazzo Braschi, Roma, già Villa della Magliana"
http://www.italica.rai.it/rinascimento/ ... t_1512.htm

Image


... but seems to be painted in the time of pope Leo (Giovanni di Medici) or late Julius (the picture address is "iconografia/prot_1512.jpg", possibly indicating, that the work is given to 1512 (which would be then commissioned by Julius).

5. Cremonese cupola currently in the Victoria & Albert Museum

?????

6. ceiling frescoes in the Palazzo Vitelli alla Cannoniera in Citta di Castello
Palazzo Vitelli alla Cannoniera

Fatto erigere da Alessandro Vitelli tra il 1521 ed il 1545 in occasione del suo matrimonio con Angela Rossi di San Secondo parmense, deve il suo nome ad un'antica fonderia o deposito di cannoni nelle immediate vicinanze. La ricca decorazione a graffito della facciata verso il giardino è opera di collaborazione di Vasari e Gherardi (detto il Doceno) al quale spetta anche la decorazione ad affresco di alcune stanze. Ad una stanza in particolare, lo studiolo, è legata una leggenda. Si narra infatti che l'amante di Alessandro Vitelli, donna Laura, usasse affacciarsi alla finestra dalla quale ancora oggi si possono vedere le antiche mura cittadine. Si dice che Laura, al passaggio di un bel giovane, lasciasse da qui cadere un fazzoletto, come scusa per farlo entrare nel palazzo. Dopo aver approfittato delle grazie del malcapitato, che subito accorreva al suo invito, lo pregava di uscire dalla porta segreta, posta nello studiolo, decorata come le pareti. Dietro la porta però non c'era via di uscita, ma un trabocchetto mortale. Questo splendido palazzo oggi è sede della Pinacoteca Comunale
Automatic translation:
Built by Alessandro Vitelli between 1521 and 1545 on the occasion of his marriage to Angela Rossi di San Secondo Parmense, takes its name from an old foundry or storage of guns in the immediate vicinity. The richly decorated with graffiti on the facade facing the garden is a work of collaboration between Vasari and Gherardi (called the Doceno) to which it is also the fresco decoration of some rooms. A room in particular, the study, is linked to a legend. We are told that the lover of Alessandro Vitelli, Donna Laura, he used to the window from which you can still see the ancient city walls. It is said that Laura, the passage of a handsome young man, left here by dropping a handkerchief, as an excuse to get him in the palace. Having taken advantage of because of the unfortunate, who immediately rushed to his invitation, she begged him to leave the secret door, placed in the closet, decorated as the walls. Behind the door but there was no way out, but a deadly trap. This magnificent building now houses the Pinacoteca Comunale
It's strange to find the Vitelli family mentioned in this context, as the military operation of Giuliano da Rovere and Lorenzo Zane and Giulio Cesare Varano and Montefeltro in autumn 1474 (the preparation of the Mantegna Tarocchi production in 1475 according the Trionfi theory) had been mainly an attack on the Vitelli in Citta di Castello. But 1521-1545 is much time later ... and I don't find pictures.

But Alessandro was born 1500 and his father was executed in Florence in October 1499 ... another Vitelli family member, Vitellozzo (then regent in Citta di Castello, was tricked and killed with other condottieri by Cesare Borgia in 1503.

7. sixteenth-century model book based on the "Mantegna tarocchi' (Paris, Bibliotheque de l"arsenal, fr. 5066), in which the pictures are accompanied by short explanatory French verses

Did Hind mention this one?
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: The "Mantegna": 1450's Bologna?

#69
Well, here's Hind's list, under "early copies in various forms," pp. 231-232. Language somewhat abbreviated by me, but not information unless I indicate it as something I'm sure you know.

DRAWINGS. ANON. Probably 15th century. Trivulzio, Milan. Codex 2143 (codice delle Sibylle). Fragments of early pen copies from some of the tarocchi, e.g. 11 and 17, on the old guard paper.
ANON. XV century, pen copies from S series. King, from 20 Apollo; Emperor, from 9 Emperor. In blank spaces within borders of the copy of Petrarch Libro degli uomini famosi, Pojano 1476 (Hain 12808) in the Henry Walters collection, Baltimore. (Probably that referred to by Kresteller, Mittelungen 1907 as in hands of Jacques Rosenthal of Munich.)
DURER. Drawings after twenty of the E series. 8 in one style, 12 in another. [You know details, Huck.]

ENGRAVINGS: HANS LADENSFELDER. From E series. B.xiii.138. [You know details, Huck.]

ILLUMINATIONS: (1) Bologna 1467, Emperor and Pope. [as you know, Huck]
(2)Vatican Codex Urb. lat 716 and 717. [as you know, Huck]
(3) BM Add. MS 11866. See additions p. xxvii. [I will look this up, Huck.]

MAIOLICA.
LICHTENSTEIN. Plate, with figure after no. 34 Temperance.
PIERPONT MORGAN (formerly). Dish with figure based on 32 Chronico in same direction as E.
VICTORIA AND ALBERT. Caffagiolo dish, c. 2127-1910 (Salting Collection), with figure after 28 Philosophy, probably after E.
----------------Faenza Drug-Jar, about 1540, c.2108 (Salting Collection), with figure after 28 Philosophy.

MEDALS. ROMAN SCHOOL. Attributed to Lysippus. Medal of Fabrizio Varano, as pronotary apostolic. The design on the reverse after No. 18 Euterpe and in same direction as E. Must date before Varano was made Bishop of Camerino, i.e. between 1471 and 1482.

PAINTING. VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM, 428-1889. Painted ceiling from old house in Via Belvedere, Cremona. About 1500. Apollo and the Seven Muses, with reminiscences of the Tarocchi most clearly seen in relation to 12 Urania, 14 Erato, 15 Polyhhynmnia, 18 Euterpe, 19 Clio.

SCULPTURE. BOLOGNA, Museo Civico, 615. Relief with figures after 1 (Beggar) and 5 (Gentleman).
MILAN. San Ambriogio. Wood carving in choir; the 8th seat on the left. After 1 (Beggar).

WOODCUTS. MICHEL WOLGEMUT. Copies or adaptations of 11, 12, 13, 15, 17, 18, 19, 22, 27, 28, 29, 34, 35, 37, 39, 42, in the series of cuts made for an unpublished work, Peter Danhauser Archetypus Triumphantis Romae, 1493-1497. See Valerian von Loga, Beitraege sum Holzschnittwerk M.W.'s. Pr. Jahrbuch xvi, 236.
Adaptations of details from E series 8, 35, 39, 42, 47, in his Planets (Bartsch 41-47).
ANONYMOUS. In the Low German Nyge Kalender printed by Steffen Arndes, Luebeck 1519, Mercury and Saturn. Mercury follows the Burgkmair print in reverse. See A. Warburg, Ueber Planetengoetterbilder im niederdeutschen Kalender von 1519, Erster Bericht des Gesellschaft der Buecherfreunde zu Hamburg, 1910 (reprinted A. Warburg, Gesammelte Schriften, Leipzig 1932, ii. pp. 483 and 645).

I will look for other lists elsewhere.

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