Re: The Precipice

#32
On the other hand, rereading Lubkin (A Rensaissance Court: Milan under Galeazzo Maria Sforza], I see that he doesn't say that the ceremony honoring her was a funeral. He uses the word "service," in a context that implies that she was bured elsewhere: "A massive service was held for the duke's sister Elisabetta when she died in 1472, even though she had been living with her husband in Montferrat" (p. 151).

In the same category, with the word "service" applied to the ceremonies honoring them, were Allesandro Sforza of Pesaro, "honored at his death in 1472 by a service patterned on the funeral of his mother," and Borso d'Este, for whom, it was said, "the services were 'very solemn and most worthy.'" (p. 151). Lubkin goes on to mention "others related to the Visconti and Sforza whom Galeazzo honored with memorial services or funerals" (p. 151f).

So Elisabetta most likely had her burial service, i.e. funeral, in Montferrat. In those days of plague and other epidemics, not to mention rapid decay, no one would have kept the body unburied for the time it took to transport it elsewhere! Isabella d'Este, for example, was buried the next day. Your suggestion that the tower and hills mght be the Santa Maria de Grazie in Montferrat and the hills of Piedmont seems to me a good one. Even if Elisabetta was buried somewhere else in the town, the church would have been a principal landmark.

Re: The Precipice

#33
But there is another hitch. The Santa Catarina/Santa Maria de Grazie church in Casale Montferrat didn't begin to be constructed until the late 17th century, completed in the early 18th century. At http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casale_Monferrat click on the name of one of the architects and you will see his dates. I saw somewhere that Elisabetta's husband William VIII was buried in the Duomo. It is rather squat. Another possibility is a church, San Domenico, that William began in 1471, the year before her death. I can't find a picture, but since it wasn't done yet, maybe the artist just created it out of his imagination.

Re: The Precipice

#34
mikeh wrote:But there is another hitch. The Santa Catarina/Santa Maria de Grazie church in Casale Montferrat didn't begin to be constructed until the late 17th century, completed in the early 18th century.
Mike, that's disappointing - something I hadn't thought of (having confused the two churches of the same name in the first place), and the difference between thorough research and what looks like carelessness. I feel a resolution coming on...

Happy New Year, everyone... %%-

Pen
He's not the Messiah, he's a very naughty boy...

Re: The Precipice

#35
I found a precipice today in the "Triumph of Chastity", which is on loan to the Ashmolean in Oxford.
"Perhaps by Liberale da Verona (about 1445-1527/29)
The Triumph of Chastity
oil on panel
Lent from the Loyd Collection

Cupid, the young god of love, has been captured by Chastity. Her chariot is surrounded by her sister virtues. The subject is from a famous poem by Petrarch.

Painted in the 1470s, this came from the front of a chest made on the occcasion of a marriage. Virtues like chastity, obedience and fidelity were considered appropriate for young brides"




This open book reminds me a little of the Popess.



The Tarot will lose all its vitality for one who allows himself to be side-tracked by its pedantry. - Aleister Crowley

Re: The Precipice

#36
Thanks for posting this lovely painting Robert - it's wonderful to have all these collections of images in one place.

Chastity seems to be showing the captured Cupid what she's written in the book she's holding (I think the dark feather must be a quill. The followers seems to be holding dark quills or feathers too.) And the wheels of that particular chariot are very close to the edge...

Pen
He's not the Messiah, he's a very naughty boy...

Re: The Precipice

#38
I think that what the followers of Chastity are holding are palm branches, symbols of victory (in this case, the victory of Chastity on Love, i.e. of the spirit on the flesh).

http://petrarch.petersadlon.com/read_tr ... ge=II-I.en
Petrarca wrote: So moved she against Love, and favored so
By heaven, and such a host of well-born souls,
That he could not withstand the massive sight.
Thousands of victims, famed and dear, from him
She rescued; and a thousand shining palms
Of victory she wrested from his hands.
Marco

Re: The Precipice

#39
They are holding the plucked feathers of Cupid's wings.
That will cool his ardour and restrain his activities.

~Lorredan
The Universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.
Eden Phillpotts

Re: The Precipice

#40
Hello Debra - not such a good eye after all... :-?

Marco (*) ahhhhhh.... they do look as if they're holding small pieces of the decoration around the chariot - thanks for the guidance and the link - I learn so much here. Just think how I could stray without this forum. Do you think that Chastity is displaying the words in the book to Cupid, or is there a different interpretation? This is like the game of pictures on the other threads.

They are holding the plucked feathers of Cupid's wings.
That will cool his ardour and restrain his activities.

~Lorredan
That's what I love about symbolism...



Pen
He's not the Messiah, he's a very naughty boy...

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