Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#41
OnePotato wrote:Marco, I appreciate your enthusiasm but to avoid confusion, it would probably be better to start a separate thread if you want to add other pictures.
I agree. I removed my previous post.
OnePotato wrote: An Allegory of War and Peace.

Basel, 1499
Two blocks, side by side.
Fragmentary.
Text below headline lacking.
One other known copy, with intact text, but different layout.

Text is a poem by Sebastian Brandt, the great Basel satirist, which treats the quarrel that broke out between Switzerland and Germany in 1499. The dispute ended at the battle of Dorneck, where Germany lost. On the left, Janus, who was thought to preside over temporal and physical boundaries, sits with staff and key.
I would have said the engraving was earlier than that. Very interesting.
I think the remark by Steve about Janus holding the key of war and peace is appropriate.

Marco

Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#42
SteveM wrote:
SteveM wrote:
marco wrote: I think the inscription reads something like "Pacis in germanicum Martem venia: per Sebastianum Brand defleta".
Ah, peace unto Germanicii (is brant making a reference to Ovid?) ~ that makes more sense! Paris (duh!)
There are allusions to Ovid in Brant's Ship of Fools, so it is possible he is making an oblique reference to Ovid here too: without looking it up I can't remember the exact details, but in Ovid's Fasti Janus addresses Germanicus Caesar (who was honoured with a Triumph on January 1), from what I recall Germanicus is refered to as a bringer of peace, and (somewhat confusedly) told to unbolt the temple doors.
The Janus text I was thinking of from Ovid's Fasti:

"See Janus comes, Germanicus, the herald of a lucky year to thee, and in my song takes precedence. Two-headed Janus, opener of the softly gliding year, thou who alone of the celestials dost behold thy back, O come propitious to the chiefs whose toil ensures peace to the fruitful earth, peace to the sea. And come propitious to thy senators and to the people of Quirinus, and by thy nod unbar the temples white. A happy morning dawns. Fair speech, fair thoughts I crave! Now must good words be spoken on a good day. Let ears be rid of suits, and banish mad disputes forthwith! Thou rancorous tongue, adjourn thy wagging! Dost mark how the sky sparkles with fragrant fires, and how Cilician saffron crackles on the kindled hearths? The flame with its own splendour beats upon the temples’ gold roof. In spotless garments the procession wends to the Tarpeian towers1; the people wear the colour of festal day; and now new rods of office lead the way, new purple gleams, and a new weight is felt by the far-sewn ivory chair. Heifers, unbroken to the yoke, offer their necks to the axe, heifers that cropped the sward on the true Faliscan plains. When from his citadel Jupiter looks abroad on the whole globe, naught but the Roman empire meets his eye. Hail, happy day! and evermore return still happier, day worthy to be kept holy by a people the masters of the world."

'...unbar the temples white.' That is, open the gates of war and peace at the temple(s) of Janus.
SteveM wrote: If there is a reference here to Germanicus Caesar, perhaps Brant is making some satirical allusion upon the relationship between Germany and Rome...
Or rather, between Germany and the Holy Roman Empire...

quote:
“The Swiss Confederation, just one of several groups formed during the 13th century, had arose as the farmers and mountain people fought against the efforts of Hapsburg-Austria to enlarge its territory in Switzerland. The Swiss were nominal subjects of the Holy Roman Empire. They did however acknowledge the emperor as their formal head and sought sanction on claims and confirmation of the rights such as approval of their charters. But the emperor’s real power to influence the daily lives and political activity was mostly non-existent. By the end of the 15th century Swiss Allegiance was merely a lip service. When the Hapsburg gained the imperial position, the Swiss became nervous and distrustful. They had had long dealing with the Hapsburgs.
... When a Hapsburg, already and Archduke of Austria, became Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire in the end of the 15th century, he sought to restore imperial authority throughout all of the German area. The usually amicable relations between the Swiss and the emperor deteriorated.”
See Janus comes, Germanicus, the herald of a lucky year to thee, and in my song takes precedence.
If Brant in 1499 was hoping for a 'lucky' year for Germany and the Holy Roman Empire* then in the context of the Swabian War he was to be sore disappointed:

"Many battles were fought from January to July 1499, and in all but a few minor skirmishes, the experienced Swiss soldiers defeated the Swabian and Habsburg armies.... When his military high commander fell in the battle of Dornach, where the Swiss won a final decisive victory, king Maximilian I had no choice but to agree to a peace treaty signed on September 22, 1499 in Basel. The treaty granted the Confederacy far-reaching independence from the empire. Although the Eidgenossenschaft officially remained a part of the empire until the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648, the peace of Basel exempted it from the imperial jurisdiction and imperial taxes and thus de facto acknowledged it as a separate political entity."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swabian_War

SteveM
* "Brant was a loyalist to the Holy Roman Empire, and when Basel joined the Swiss Confederation in 1499, Brant (gave up his post at the University of Basel and later) returned to imperial Strasbourg. There he worked for the city in various administrative capacities until his death in 1521... was both a devout Catholic and a supporter of Maximilian I, the German king who became Holy Roman Emperor in 1491. Brant believed that the Holy Roman Empire had come into German hands because Germany was divinely ordained to lead the temporal Christian world..."

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sca/digital/ship ... ction.html

http://www.sebastian-brant.com/
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#43
So people read that one pretty well! A few more details than the book.
Thank you to SteveM for the additional in-depth background info.
(I love that Sebastian Brandt has his own Dot Com!)
The catalog entries are not particularly exhaustive.

Thanks Marco, for holding off on your picture.
Maybe you can go back to it and start a new game when these 13 rounds are finished.

Here is the next round.
Perhaps this one may be a bit more familiar to some.
If you've actually read anything about it in the past, and had an explanation spelled out for you, please hold your comments until after I post the catalog entry so as not to influence the others who haven't seen it before.

Ulm, 1470 or later.
282a.jpg
I am not a cannibal.

Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#45
OnePotato wrote:
Perhaps this one may be a bit more familiar to some.
If you've actually read anything about it in the past, and had an explanation spelled out for you, please hold your comments until after I post the catalog entry so as not to influence the others who haven't seen it before.

I know this one, so I'll sit this round out. :(
When a clock is hungry, it goes back four seconds.

Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#47
Pope and Emperor (?) seem to be supporting each other on very shaky ground, atop the mast of a ship (allegory of empire holy roman?). The pope is holding a blazon of France (crowned and topped by a two headed cock - a traditional symbol of France based on the pun gallus) in one hand (there is another blazon of France, uncrowned, hung on the branch of a tree in the opposite lower corner) and a purse in the other; one of the pope's feet rests on the mast of the ship, the other on a wheel. The emperor has one foot resting on a Lion (of Burgundy?) and the other is unsupported (next to that of the popes on the mast), he holds a sceptre in his hand which is broken in half (with a ribbon with text on it 'bohemia' perhaps?). There is loads of text most of which I can't make out - is the emperor identified as 'fridericus' (Frederic III and Pope Pius II?) There are several titles of 'rex' (of hungary for example, and Dane, and... Brone?) and 'dux' (of burgundy for example).
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#49
debra wrote:Yep.

Why are they nearly naked?
Good question - church and aristocracy defrocked, french blazons with two-headed cocks and scales are connecting with french revolution at the back of my mind somewhere - but that is far too late surely, ah yes - 1470's says OP (erm.. with that ambiguous 'or later'), that would fit my initial impression of a reference to Frederick III and Pius II - can't remember any particular details of their relationship with France at the time though...

Do the pans of the scales have letters in them 'P' and 'T' ?

Is that a serpent or fish of some sort wrapping itself round the Pope's head?

Near naked wrestlers? Is there a suggestion of something 'unholy' going on in the 'Holy Roman Empire' ?

And why the bare tree with French blazon - some reference or claim to (lost) 'lineage' ?

Scales - wheels - ship mast = 'balance' (of power?) or 'mutability'?

Wheel, purse, scales, serpent would suggest a greater love for things of this world, than of the divine...

'sic transit gloria mundi'

And what of the ray of the Sun / Star touching the forehead of the lion - birth of a new king? Heir to the house of Burgundy?
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#50
It looks like the Emperor/King is pouring a vial of water onto the wheel (waterwheel?) the Pope is standing on.

Is that moneybag hanging from around the King's neck, or the waist of the Pope?

And...it looks like there's water running into the left side of the boat.

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