Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#31
marco wrote: I have checked a dictionary...I guess I have violated the rules :(
What? YOU?
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A demon-goat???? :ymdevil: Violating rules??? :-o
=))
The Tarot will lose all its vitality for one who allows himself to be side-tracked by its pedantry. - Aleister Crowley

Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#32
debra wrote:So the burning knight is Mars?
The battles of fiery Mars seems to be 'scorching the earth' in warfare....
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#33
marco wrote:
R.A. Hendley wrote:Mercury as perhaps the flourishing of knowledge or health in peace-time
I agree with your analysis of the elements of Peace and War, RAH. But I think that Mercury is here mainly as a symbol of the flourishing of commerce, since he is holding a purse which I think is full of money. Still, the presence of this God also suggests the other associations you pointed out.

My brain must have been on 'power save' or something. The flourishing of commerce would be better. I knew that!! :((

SteveM wrote:...when the snakes of the caduceus blow in the wind like ribbons as in this picture it usually empahsises the function of Mercury as herald.
I did not however know that! That is a nice bit of information. :x
When a clock is hungry, it goes back four seconds.

Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#34
SteveM wrote:
marco wrote: I think the inscription reads something like "Pacis in germanicum Martem venia: per Sebastianum Brand defleta".
Ah, peace unto Germanicii (is brant making a reference to Ovid?) ~ that makes more sense! Paris (duh!)
There are allusions to Ovid in Brant's Ship of Fools, so it is possible he is making an oblique reference to Ovid here too: without looking it up I can't remember the exact details, but in Ovid's Fasti Janus addresses Germanicus Caesar (who was honoured with a Triumph on January 1), from what I recall Germanicus is refered to as a bringer of peace, and (somewhat confusedly) told to unbolt the temple doors. If there is a reference here to Germanicus Caesar, perhaps Brant is making some satirical allusion upon the relationship between Germany and Rome...
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#36
debra wrote:....(2) why Mars is looking left, rather than surveying the havoc he's brought about.
Yes, Mercury is looking to the left too ~ perhaps as an invocation of peace, they are shown looking away from war? Mercury has a purse bag # close the gates of war # keep shut/treasure the rewards of peace??? Peace as the 'triumph of war'? Mercury as diplomat offering tribute?

Don't know, think I've gone as far as I can ...
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Here is a Game of "Prints"

#39
Marco, I appreciate your enthusiasm but to avoid confusion, it would probably be better to start a separate thread if you want to add other pictures.

In the meantime:

An Allegory of War and Peace.

Basel, 1499
Two blocks, side by side.
Fragmentary.
Text below headline lacking.
One other known copy, with intact text, but different layout.

Text is a poem by Sebastian Brandt, the great Basel satirist, which treats the quarrel that broke out between Switzerland and Germany in 1499. The dispute ended at the battle of Dorneck, where Germany lost. On the left, Janus, who was thought to preside over temporal and physical boundaries, sits with staff and key. With him stands winged Mercury, with his caduceus (a branch with two serpents), dressed as a simple burgher but bearing a sword and a bag of money. At left are three musicians, and in the background a peasant tills his fields. Obviously depicted are the just processes and rewards of peace. The right half features Mars, standing in a fire and holding a spear with a standard. In his left hand he carries a bellows to fan the flames. The landscape is strewn with the ravages of war, including a wolf eating a lamb, men fighting, the dead, and a burning village.
This broadside was published in Basel, by Johann Bergmann, dated and "signed" in the last line, "1499/Nihil sine causa/Olpe." (OP Note: Apparently he is referring to the other known copy.) But, it has been pointed out that the style of the cut points to one of the designers that was employed by Johann Grüninger of Strassburg.

I'll post the next one in a bit, in case anyone has further comments on this one.
I am not a cannibal.

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