Re: Matching the Triumphs

#11
Kaplan, in Volume II, talking about the Cary-Yale Visconti deck says:
The Chariot depicts a female figure dressed in a long gown incised with the ducal crown, laurel and palm motif. She holds across her right shoulder a thin, long scepter. In her right hand is a disc decorated with the Visconti emblem of a dove in profile above a think ribbon. Although the ribbon shown here is worn, other presentations of the Visconti dove suggest that originally the ribbon bore the legend A bon droyt. The chariot, covered with an ornate canopy, is led by two rearing horses, one mounted by a young man in a wide-brimmed hat. The scene of The Chariot card in the Cary-Yale Visconti deck is substantially different from the Pierpont Morgan-Bergamo card by virtue of the man on horseback, the canopied chariot, and the dove, plus the scenes on the two cards face opposite directions.
I checked Dummett "The Visconti Sforza Tarot Cards", but of course, he is describing the Visconti Sforza deck. I'll bring it in as well just for the comparison:
Image


Dummett says:
This is a triumphal chariot and is referred to as such in one sixteenth-century source; it is usually known simply as "the Chariot" (il carro). The staging of triumphal processions, in imitation of those of ancient Rome, was very common in Renaissance Italy, as Jacob Burckhardt has shown. Some, like Cesare Borgia's in 1500, were in celebration of personal triumphs, staged after a successful campaign. Francesco Sforza, by contrast, refused the honor of entering Milan in such a triumphal procession after its surrender in 1450. But triumphs were usually pure spectacles of an allegorical character. Gertrude Moakley's theory is that the whole sequence of tarot trumps represents a burlesque "triumph" of this latter kind, which is why the term trionfi was used for them, to work out out in detail. On most versions of this card, the rider in the triumphal chariot is indeed a conqueror, often a king, wearing armor and standing. Here, it is a seated queen, crowned and holding an orb; her golden robe is patterned with radiant sun, and her chariot is drawn by winged horses. Some definite allusion may have been intended, but I do not know. A copy of this card was in the Tozzi Set (whereaboutss unknown).
Berti and Gonard in "Visconti Tarots", also talking abut the Sforza Visconti card say basically the same thing, but add:
It has been pointed out that the female figure driving the chariot is comparable to many allegories of Glory and Fame typical of the period; it can be found, for example, in Bocaccio's Amorosa Visione and Petrarch's Trionfi.
The Tarot will lose all its vitality for one who allows himself to be side-tracked by its pedantry. - Aleister Crowley

Re: Matching the Triumphs

#12
Hi Robert,

In your matching of the Triumphs, there are two that I would interchange. I would match The Triumph of Eternity with The World, and the Triumph of Fame with Judgement. The counterpart of the Judgement card in some old Minchiate decks shows the angel with two trumpets above the gates of a city (sans people rising from their coffins).This card was often called Fame. This seems very appropriate to me because from a more universal point of view, one's fame (how one is remembered by others when one has left the physical world) is in a very real sense, one's judgement.

Re: Matching the Triumphs

#13
Triumphs are a genre of the period, within which Petrarch is an influential exemplar, but not an orignator (nor the only exemplar); even in the genre of the triumph of love he is not unique, but follows within the classical model of Ovid. So while the tarocchi and Petrarch are within the genre of the triumph, it is a mistake I think to make one dependant on the other. As pertinent to the time, though the emphasis is on the triumph of Mars rather than Venus, are the works on triumphi by Valturio of the Court of Malatesta (Rimini) and of Biondo (Rome) in the 1440's & 1450's.

But I agree it is largely the Ovidian motive of Love as perpetuated in Petrarch rather than the military triumphal motives revived by Valturio or Biondo that is relevant, and perpetuated as a motif of 'sacred marriage' in the context of later 'tarocchi/triumphal' patterns such as that of the Tarot de Marseille; with an especial emphasis on Gregorian and (neo-platonic) Augustine treatments of divine and human love; the neo-platonic two loves/venuses as interpreted by the 12th century school of Chartre and the revival of such in the humanistic schools of Northern Italy in the 15th century.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Matching the Triumphs

#15
SteveM wrote:Triumphs are a genre of the period, within which Petrarch is an influential exemplar, but not an orignator (nor the only exemplar); even in the genre of the triumph of love he is not unique, but follows within the classical model of Ovid. So while the tarocchi and Petrarch are within the genre of the triumph, it is a mistake I think to make one dependant on the other. As pertinent to the time, though the emphasis is on the triumph of Mars rather than Venus, are the works on triumphi by Valturio of the Court of Malatesta (Rimini) and of Biondo (Rome) in the 1440's & 1450's.

But I agree it is largely the Ovidian motive of Love as perpetuated in Petrarch rather than the military triumphal motives revived by Valturio or Biondo that is relevant, and perpetuated as a motif of 'sacred marriage' in the context of later 'tarocchi/triumphal' patterns such as that of the Tarot de Marseille; with an especial emphasis on Gregorian and (neo-platonic) Augustine treatments of divine and human love; the neo-platonic two loves/venuses as interpreted by the 12th century school of Chartre and the revival of such in the humanistic schools of Northern Italy in the 15th century.

I believe sir, you have found the topic (or topics) for your first book. Lots of interesting 'leads' to follow here.
When a clock is hungry, it goes back four seconds.

Re: Girls (and boys) just wanna have fun...

#16
R.A. Hendley wrote:
SteveM wrote:Triumphs are a genre of the period, within which Petrarch is an influential exemplar, but not an orignator (nor the only exemplar); even in the genre of the triumph of love he is not unique, but follows within the classical model of Ovid. So while the tarocchi and Petrarch are within the genre of the triumph, it is a mistake I think to make one dependant on the other. As pertinent to the time, though the emphasis is on the triumph of Mars rather than Venus, are the works on triumphi by Valturio of the Court of Malatesta (Rimini) and of Biondo (Rome) in the 1440's & 1450's.

But I agree it is largely the Ovidian motive of Love as perpetuated in Petrarch rather than the military triumphal motives revived by Valturio or Biondo that is relevant, and perpetuated as a motif of 'sacred marriage' in the context of later 'tarocchi/triumphal' patterns such as that of the Tarot de Marseille; with an especial emphasis on Gregorian and (neo-platonic) Augustine treatments of divine and human love; the neo-platonic two loves/venuses as interpreted by the 12th century school of Chartre and the revival of such in the humanistic schools of Northern Italy in the 15th century.

I believe sir, you have found the topic (or topics) for your first book. Lots of interesting 'leads' to follow here.
LUCENTIO ~ A student seeking to further his Aristotelean education 'in pursuit of virtue' :-B
1 Tranio, since for the great desire I had
2 To see fair Padua, nursery of arts,
3 I am arriv'd for fruitful Lombardy,
4 The pleasant garden of great Italy;
5 And by my father's love and leave am arm'd
6 With his good will and thy good company,
7 My trusty servant, well approv'd in all,
8 Here let us breathe and haply institute
9 A course of learning and ingenious studies.
10 Pisa renown'd for grave citizens
11 Gave me my being and my father first,
12 A merchant of great traffic through the world,
13 Vincetino come of Bentivolii.
14 Vincetino's son brought up in Florence
15 It shall become to serve all hopes conceiv'd,
16 To deck his fortune with his virtuous deeds:
17 And therefore, Tranio, for the time I study,
18 Virtue and that part of philosophy
19 Will I apply that treats of happiness
20 By virtue specially to be achieved.
21 Tell me thy mind; for I have Pisa left
22 And am to Padua come, as he that leaves
23 A shallow plash to plunge him in the deep
24 And with satiety seeks to quench his thirst.


But let us not abjure Ovid responds TRANIO ~ An advocate, we may say, of the role of play in education :ymparty:
25 Mi perdonato, gentle master mine,
26 I am in all affected as yourself;
27 Glad that you thus continue your resolve
28 To suck the sweets of sweet philosophy.
29 Only, good master, while we do admire
30 This virtue and this moral discipline,
31 Let's be no stoics nor no stocks, I pray;
32 Or so devote to Aristotle's checks
33 As Ovid be an outcast quite abjured.
34 Balk logic with acquaintance that you have
35 And practise rhetoric in your common talk;
36 Music and poesy use to quicken you;
37 The mathematics and the metaphysics,
38 Fall to them as you find your stomach serves you;
39 No profit grows where is no pleasure ta'en:
40 In brief, sir, study what you most affect.

The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare, act 1, scene 1

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