An early Florentine prototype for "the world" image

#1
I finally received the accompanying catalogue for the "Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance: Painting and Illumination, 1300–1350" Getty exhibition (comments on the Giotto's Virtues/Allegory artcile in that thread) and one work caught my eye because of a detail and its resemblance to the "Gloria Mundi" illuminations and subsequent use in tarot's "world" cards, much discussed in Petrarch threads and elsewhere. The detail in question is by the "Master of the Dominican Effigies" and named precisely for this piece from the conevnt of S. Maria Novella in Florence, c. 1336. The piece as a whole and the best details I could find on-line:
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The article by Eve Borsook (research associate at Villa I Tatti/Harvard) notes the sceptre held by Christ is "surmounted by a fleur-de-lis and also a disk displaying an unusual image that seems to represent the world or universe. A ring of stars and a ring of water encircle a series of buildings depicted in the style of contemporary Florentine architecture, including the centermost building, which evokes the Palazzo Vecchio with its crenellated tower."

I doubt you can make the tower out in the jpegs posted here as I can just make it out in the catalogue. But the point I'd like to make here is that "the world" here bespeaks to civic identification, no less than does Jesus's fleur-capped sceptre, which is the same point I've made for the CY (dowry of Cremona, a Milanese possession into whose orbit the marriage to Bianca would drag Sforza), the PMB (an ideal city meant to represent a rebuilt Milan after the ravages of the Ambrosian Republic), amd the CVI "world" (where the hilltop towns must be Florence's Tuscan contado). Prudence-as-world (her mirror becomes "world", or rather the rightly ordered world below reflects that of the directing virtue of Prudence above, channeled by the civic leaders) means the right directing of the polity, divinely so in this case.

And I still think the below would have been a predecessor model for the reconstructed Anghiari deck's "world" card, The Expulsion of the Duke of Athens from Florence, Andrea di Cione Orcagna, ca. 1345, featuring the same circular/tondo/mirror-like framing and Palazzo Vecchio:
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The final outcome in the quattrocento, the CVI "world" - Jesus's fleur-di-lis sceptre now held by an orb/dominion-wielding virtue:
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Phaeded

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