Waite's Second Tarot Deck - Originals Discovered

#1
Tali Goodwin and Marcus Katz have discovered the original paintings by J.B. Trinick for Waite's second tarot deck (depicted in black & white reproductions in Decker and Dummett's A History of the Occult Tarot). They will be raising money soon on Indigogo in order to publish a color book of the paintings and of Waite's original commentary on these cards before Christmas.
There's lots more info and images here:
http://marygreer.wordpress.com/2011/09/ ... discovery/

Re: Waite's Second Tarot Deck - Originals Discovered

#4
This is a wonderful find ! Thanx for the heads up Mary. The bottom of the Moon card that is shown on the site you've linked to has a familiar look to me now. Very similar to the non Tarot art of Pamela Colman Smith, in fact. Her art can be seen at Roppo's site
http://www7.ocn.ne.jp/~elfindog/pcsworks.htm
and at Yale there are 2 paintings in particular -
http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_cro ... d=1007198
http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/dl_cro ... d=1007204
Kaplan calls her art 'Symbolist' in his bio that accompanies the PCS Commemorative Set. I have read about it on Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symbolism_(arts).
I can see this in the art of this second deck, by J.B. Trinick. I am no art expert, and I won't dub his style symbolist, but it sure looks like it to me. Waite must've liked this style of art.
Deliver me from reasons why you'd rather cry - I'd rather fly...
Jim Morrison - The Crystal Ship

Re: Waite's Second Tarot Deck - Originals Discovered

#5
There are also images of the sephiroth, which I presume are the rest of the Order's* 'symbols of the paths'...

quote:
John Brahms Trinick (Frater Donee Attingam), a stained glass artist whose work was often exhibited at the Royal Academy, joined the Order as a young man when he arrived in England with the Australian Army during the First World War. He painted the 'Symbols of the Paths' (substitutes for traditional Tarot designs) used by the Order and drew the portrait of Waite, in his robes as Imperator of the order,* that appears as the frontispiece to Volume I of A New Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry. Later in life he took up Jungian psychology and wrote on the psychological interpretation of alchemy, his book The Fire-Tried Stone being published in 1967.
end quote from
A. E. Waite - Magician of Many Parts by R. A. Gilbert p.146

So the whole set constitutes the symbols of the 32 paths of kabalistic theosophy (the ten sefirah and 22 connecting paths of the ToL). Making a set of 32 Trumps!?*

There is a short bio of Trinick here with photos of his portrait and some of his stained glass windows:
http://www.margatecivicsociety.org.uk/M ... 0(359).pdf

SteveM

*Fellowship of the Rosy Cross - which I also presume will not be very happy at the publication of their 'symbols of the paths' (which I believe they still use) being published!?

Update - not only are they reported to be not very happy, it is claimed they still possess the original paintings:
http://order-of-the-golden-dawn.blogspo ... paths.html

The initation rites and ceremonies of the FRC have been published by Ishtar Publishing, in 2005 and 2008: I haven't read them so have no idea if they contain any references from which any of Waite's revised attributions may be reconstructed.

Published by Ishtar Publishing in 2005:
http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Rosicruc ... 0973593172

Also in 2008:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rosicrucian-Cer ... 0978388348

* His drawing of Waite in ceremonial robes:
http://www.adepti.com/adepti.orig/ports4.html

* quote:
The allocation of the Tarot Trumps Major to the Paths of the Tree of Life is obviously the next step, and attempts have been made in this direction by blundering symbolists, but they have forgotten that in the Mystical Tree the Sephiroth are also Paths, making thirty-two Paths of Wisdom, from which it follows that in the logic of things there ought to be thirty-two Trumps.
end quote from
The Great Symbols of the Tarot by Arthur Edward Waite
Published in The Occult Review January 1926
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

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