Pierre Le Moyne: Femmes fortes ... 21 women

#1
"La gallerie des femmes fortes" from Pierre De Moyne (1647)

http://www.archive.org/details/lagalleriedesfem00lemo

That's a sort of prolongation of Tarocchi ideas to book form, somehow the expansion of the Boiardo Tarocchi poem. In similar sense it's a development of the neuf preux idea. Now it are not "9 heroes", but 20 women, 5 Jewish, 5 Barbars, 5 Romains and 5 Christians. Each heroine gets "examples in real life" (mostly one, occasionally two) and a feminist theme, for instance: "Si les Femmes son capables de gouverner". And everybody got a picture.

That are the content pages:





That's part of the text in electronic form:
Les Fortes Iuifves
Debore ... Isabelle Infant d'Espagne, Archiduchesse des Pays-Bas ... Marguerite d'Austriche, Duchess de Parme, Gouvernante des Pays-Bas
Iahel ... Jeanne de Betford Reyne d'Escosse ... Catherine Du Glas
Iudith ... Marulle de Stilimene
Salomene ... Marguerite Morus fille de Thomas Morus Chancelier d'Angleterre
Mariamne ... Blanche de Bourbon Reyne de Castille

Les Fortes Barbares
Panthe'e ... Ingonde and Clotilde de France
Camme ... Sancie de Navarre
Artemise ... Blanche de Castille Reyne and Regente de France
Monime ... La Brave Hongroise
Zenobie ... Jeanne de Montfort

Les Fortes Romaines
Lucrece ... Gondeberge De France Reyne de Lombardie
Clelie ... Theodelinde, Reyne de Lombardie
Porcie ... Francooise de Cezely, Dame de Barry
Arrie ... Ieanne Coello, femme de Antoine Perez
Pauline ... Ieanne Gray Deb Suffolc

Les Fortes Chrestiennes
La Iudith Francoise ... Blanche de Rossy
Isabelle de Castille ... Marguerite de Foix, Duchess d'Espernon
La Pucelle D'Orleans ... Isabelle Reyne de Castille
La Captive Victorieuse ... La Chaste Venitienne
Marie Stuart ... Marguerite d'Aniou
And that''s a picture example:



******************

Perhaps somebody has fun to help with the person identifications ...
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Pierre Le Moyne: Femmes fortes ... 21 women

#2
Hi Huck -Pierre Le Moyne also wrote one of the first books about emblems and 'devices' ( heraldic logos of a sort).

EDITED August 19 2011 - I was mistaken on this. It was Paolo Giovio, not Le Moyne. See my correction post later in this thread
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=729&p=10511#p10525

It is always mentioned in literature on the renaissance emblem books. These books are full of tarot like iconography. I, of course, can only enjoy the pictures, but you, who can read these languages mught get much more out of
http://www.archive.org/details/delartdesdevises00lemo
and
http://www.archive.org/details/deuisesheroiques00lemo
which are copiously illustrated.
Deliver me from reasons why you'd rather cry - I'd rather fly...
Jim Morrison - The Crystal Ship

Re: Pierre Le Moyne: Femmes fortes ... 21 women

#3
hoo wrote:Hi Huck -Pierre Le Moyne also wrote one of the first books about emblems and 'devices' ( heraldic logos of a sort). It is always mentioned in literature on the renaissance emblem books. These books are full of tarot like iconography. I, of course, can only enjoy the pictures, but you, who can read these languages mught get much more out of
http://www.archive.org/details/delartdesdevises00lemo
and
http://www.archive.org/details/deuisesheroiques00lemo
which are copiously illustrated.
No, my French isn't so good. Nonetheless I took a look at these works and they don't get my enthusiasm.

Image


It isn't really funny, when you get ...
Your search - "soli se credit coelo" - did not match any documents.
... :-)

Image


"Me quoque post patrem" (Moi aussi après mon père / me too, after my father) finds a few notes, but that's mostly Russian.

Both are presented with heraldic, but the author forgets a clear identification, who used this "devise" or motto ... possibly in the hope, that everybody knows the shields ... :-) ... (me not, après mon père)

One can put a lot of energy in such stuff, but it isn't like Moyne's femmes fortes a 21-element scheme and so not somehow related to the Trionfi and Tarocchi development. And if the the elements are so badly mirrored in the search engine, I don't know, if it is worth the energy ...

I personally love "systems", if they are closed (whatever they contain, 21 elements, 40 elements, 50 elements, 97 elements ... or even a few thousands like these opulent lot books, whatever, but they must be intended to be closed to be a system). These two objects look more like the endless sea of words ... my time doesn't allow such tasks.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Pierre Le Moyne: Femmes fortes ... 21 women

#4
Thanks for the excellent links, Hoo. These are two emblem books I wasn't aware of. They are valuable for showing the diversity of imagery from which the tarot drew. For example, the phoenix that Huck pictured is an example of a phoenix that doesn't have a fire under him but instead stretches his wings to the sun (as in the Conver Star card). It also has a stump with a leafy branch growing from it, which explains to anyone who didn't know that the Phoenix is a symbol of rejuvenation. This phoenix also explains a similar image in alchemical emblems, specifically Maier's Emblem 64 of Atalanta Fugiens, for which see my post of yesterday (well, today GMT) in the thread "tarot and alchemy."

Re: Pierre Le Moyne: Femmes fortes ... 21 women

#5
Huck wrote:... I took a look at these works and they don't get my enthusiasm.
well, I have to agree. These kinds of emblems are rather plain looking and boring after a while. Perhaps the Prosopographia, sive, Virtvtvm, animi, corporis, bonorvm externorvm, vitiorvm, et affectvvm variorvm delineatio will get your attention. It is certainly a favourite of mine.
http://www.archive.org/details/prosopographiasi00gall
prosopographiasi00gall_0009.jpg
prosopographiasi00gall_0009.jpg (18.05 KiB) Viewed 6832 times
For those unfamiliar with this image, it is Diana at Ephesus (in modern day Turkey). The story goes that after Dionysus defeated the Amazons, they fled to this spot and put up a temple to their goddess. The statue eventually was lost, and all we have are descriptions from Pausanius and the like, which have traditionally been interpretd thusly, though there is another version with a decolletage of many egg shaped orbs , instead of breasts. But I firmly believe in the form depicted above :)
Deliver me from reasons why you'd rather cry - I'd rather fly...
Jim Morrison - The Crystal Ship

Re: Pierre Le Moyne: Femmes fortes ... 21 women

#6
hoo wrote:
Huck wrote:...
For those unfamiliar with this image, it is Diana at Ephesus (in modern day Turkey). The story goes that after Dionysus defeated the Amazons, they fled to this spot and put up a temple to their goddess. The statue eventually was lost, and all we have our descriptions from Pausanius and the like, which have traditionally been interpretd thusly, though there is another version with a decolletage of many egg shaped orbs , instead of breasts. But I firmly believe in the form depicted above :)
Two statues of Artemis discovered at the Temple of Artemis in Ephesus can be seen at the Ephesus Museum in Selçuk:

http://www.sacred-destinations.com/turk ... museum.htm
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Pierre Le Moyne: Femmes fortes ... 21 women

#7
Hi mikeh - You really know your stuff! I've been studying emblem books for 1 and 1/2 years now, and I could never take apart one like you did above
mikeh wrote:the phoenix that Huck pictured is an example of a phoenix that doesn't have a fire under him but instead stretches his wings to the sun (as in the Conver Star card). It also has a stump with a leafy branch growing from it, which explains to anyone who didn't know that the Phoenix is a symbol of rejuvenation.
Hi steveM - Thanx for the link. There is a pretty good article on wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_Artemis
and this site has much info, and a lot of pix
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/enc ... temis.html
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/enc ... ision.html
and don't misss the link to the amazon page
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/enc ... azons.html
Deliver me from reasons why you'd rather cry - I'd rather fly...
Jim Morrison - The Crystal Ship

Re: Pierre Le Moyne: Femmes fortes ... 21 women

#8
Hey Huck ! - I made a huge mistake about Le moyne. :D
The book everyone cites in modern emblem scholarship is by Paolo Giovio
http://www.archive.org/details/dialoguedesdevis00giov
http://www.archive.org/details/dialogodellimpre00giov
David Manning says in "The Emblem' pg 73 (Reaktion Books 2002, London)
"Paolo Giovio (1483-1552), Bishop of Nocera, historian, antiquarian, and friend of Alcioto, is frequently credited with the writing of the first treatise on imprese, the 'Dialogo dell'imprese Militari et Amorose'..though...Claude Paradin's Devises heroiques predates it by four years"
I can't go back and correct my above post without destroying the intelligibility of this thread, so I'm going to add a correction pointing down to this post. :fool
Deliver me from reasons why you'd rather cry - I'd rather fly...
Jim Morrison - The Crystal Ship

Re: Pierre Le Moyne: Femmes fortes ... 21 women

#10
hoo wrote: Hi steveM - Thanx for the link. There is a pretty good article on wikipedia
I live about a 20 minute bus ride from Ephesus and the Temple of Artemis. I am taking some friends to Selcuk today where they can visit the museum if they wish - after we have been to Sirince for a bit of wine tasting.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

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