The Fortune of Francois Isnard: A treasury of innovation --

#1
Fortune on the four of coins, an emblem that appears on the decks of the engraver Francois Isnard [or of those of some who copied from him] -- an engraver who appears connected with both our earliest appearnce of the TdB and of french suited animal tarots --
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Francois Isnard, 1695 - 1765, moved from Provence to Strasbourg in 1715 and married there in 1716 - he was father-in-law of the cardmaker Francoise Bouchard, for whom he engraved molds for playing cards, including a french suited animal tarot mold, and in whose house he died in 1765 --

The master cardmaker David Benoist of Strasboug and his wife were Godfather and Godmother for two of his children, born in 1723 and 1725-

From 1728 his initials begin to appear on several prints- according to BnF all active cardmakers of strasbourg used his molds between 1730 - 1760 (and continued to be used by some for much longer, as per the Benoist, Carey and Sarraman examples we have) -- here is the chariot from a Francois Isnard deck, with his initials of the shield:
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On this deck from what appears to be a 'generic mold' there is no makers name on the two of coins, nor on the two of cups - the engravers initials however appear on various cards:
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Strasbourg based cardmakers who used this style of FI's molds would stamp their name on the two of coins, for example here is a reproduction of a Benois deck by il Meneghello, and L Carey [c1795] from a copy at the British Museum:
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you can see the initials of FI on the petals between the 'dolphin' heads:
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The stamped nature of the cardmakers/merchants name is clear on this BnF copy of a J Benoist /FI deck, with the ink of the name being clearly different to the background printed ink:
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This copy of a J B Benois at the British Museum has the name stamp upside down:
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Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: The Fortune of Francois Isnard: A treasury of innovation --

#2
In Mellet's essay on tarot, the tarot he describes is clearly a Tarot de Besancon type, however with his description of the four of coins I think we can further than that and identify the deck he used as a Francois Isnard -- here is a selection of cards from the British Museums 'FI" [Francoise Isnard] deck, which relate to the description of Mellet:
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http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/c ... 5&partId=1

A Benois was identified by @ Evalyne Hall as probable deck used by Mellet during her research while translating the essays of Gebelin and Mellet, and a Benois is certainly a strong possibility, but other cardmakers of the time also used the molds of FI, so the only thing we can say with certainty I think is that is was an Isnard engraved deck --



A selection of cards from a B Sarramon/F Isnard deck, from a copy at the National Library of France, with cartomantic notes:
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http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b10511145z

[Someone with a greater understanidn of French than I might be able to read/transcribe the handwriting? The number 74 on the four of coins suggests Etteilla --]

The Jack of Clubs from a french suited animal tarot of Francoise Bouchard c1755-1765, engraved by his father-in-law Francois Isnard, whose initials can be seen on the halberd:
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His initials also appear on Trump I:
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http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b1 ... checontact

[ According to Depaulis [IPCS 39/2, p. 64-79] FI engraved very similar animal tarots for the German cardmakers J W Weber of Ulm, and Chaso and Henrion - datable to the 1740s, c1745 - Making FI's the earliest of the french suited tarot decks we currently know of -- the Strasbourg cardmaker Jantet [1759-1776] also produced an animal tarot engraved by Isnard --]

Do we have a family tree of the Benoit/Benois/Benoist, cardmakers of Strasbourg with approximate dates of their activity? I have conflicting dates for the J-B Benois I would like to clear up, some say it is 1720 rather than late 18th century!? Il Meneghello late 17th century (which is impossible, the engraver Isnard would have been under 5 years of age at the end of the 17th century) - according to Depaulis the earliest reference to a Benoist cardmaker in Strasbourg is for a David Benoist (1717-1761) --

Francois Isnard was the father of Pierre-François Isnard, reputed inventor of the 'little soldiers' of Strasbourg - I What is the relationship, if any, to Pierre Isnard, engraver of the F Laudier of Strasbourg cards 1746?

SteveM

Francois Isnard chose master cardmaker David Benoist and his wife as Godfather and Godmother of his two children born in 1923 and 1925 - so may we presume that Isnard was engraving his molds for the Benoists, as well as other cardmakers, at this early period?

According to the same source, FI died in 1765 at the home of his son-in-law, the master cardmaker Bouchard:

"François Isnard le père, outre qu'il travailla pour les éditeurs strasbourgeois, semble surtout avoir gravé des jeux de cartes pour des maîtres-cartiers comme David BENOIST, qu'il prit, ainsi que sa femme, comme parrain et marraine de deux de ses enfants, nés en 1723 et 1725, et FRANÇOIS BOUCHAUD, qui devint vers 1759 son gendre et dans la maison duquel il mourut, place de la Cathédrale, le 19 janvier 1765."

https://books.google.com.tr/books?id=PS ... oQ6AEIKTAA

"Master-cartier David Benoist's name first appears in 1717 in the minutes of the Stelz guild. He successively hires cardmakers Claude Chamonet of Dijon (1717), Pierre Ran of Liège (1720), Marc Bouvard of Chambéry (1721), Jean Poursi (or Borsi) of Cleremont (1721) and Claude Thomasin, native of Armelin in Savoy and some others, including Jacob Spath Solothurn already mentioned above -"

Nous n'avons pas trouvé mention de l'acquisition du droit de bourgeoisie par David Benoist. En revanche, nous avons repéré une Marie Madeleine, fille de François Benoist, passementier à Namur (Belgique). Elle avait deux enfants quand elle acquit le droit de bourgeoisie le 17 novembre 1700. C'était peut-être une parente du maître-cartier David Benoist dont le nom apparaît en 1717 dans les procès-verbaux. Il embauche successivement Claude Chamonet de Dijon (1717), Pierre Ran de Liège (1720), Marc Bouvard de Chambéry (1721), Jean Poursi (ou Borsi) de Cleremont33 (1721) et Claude Thomasin, natif d'Armelin en Savoie et quelques autres, dont Jacob Spath de Soleure déjà cité plus haut --

https://books.google.com.tr/books?id=aC ... sQ6AEIKTAA

There is some mention of the engraver Francois Isnard in previous topic here:
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=821
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: The Fortune of Francois Isnard: A treasury of innovation --

#3
SteveM wrote:
06 Mar 2018, 17:16
"Master-cartier David Benoist's name first appears in 1717 in the minutes of the Stelz guild.
Extraits des procès-verbaux de la corporation de l'Échasse (1716-1724) - par François-Joseph FUCHS

is online here:
http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k9 ... nmacher%22

These are the entries relating to cardmakers I found:

1717

p. 56 Jean Louis Ducmain, kartenmacher (6I) gesell von Liège bey herm Louis Laboisse, stehet vor und hat über die ordnung geschwohren.

p. 82 Claude Chamonet, kartenmacher gesell von Dichont bey herm David Benoist, kartenmacher, stehen vor undt haben über die ordnung geschwohren.

1718

p. 94 François Fournier, kartenmacher gesell von Marsaille aus Provance bey herrn Louis la Boisse in diensten juravit.

1719

p. 146 Isaac Stein, der kartenmacher von Colin gebürtig, erscheint und producirt cantzley- pfenningthurn und stallschein, bittet jhme das zunft- und stubenrecht gedeyen zu lassen. Erkannt gegen erlag der gebühr willfahrt.

1721

p. 203 Marc Bouvard de Jeanperi [Chambéry], kartenmacher bey herm David Benoiste, Jean Poursi de Cleremont, kartenmacher auch bey hr. Benoiste,

p. 238 Claude Thomasin gebürtig zu Armelin (146) in Savoyen, der kartenmacher bey hern David Benoiste, stehen vor und haben über die ordnung handtrew abgelegt.

1723

p. 239 Guillaume Affine, kartenmacher von Albij (147) in Languedoc erscheint und producirt cantzley- stallund pfenningthurnsschein de 3. aprilis 1723 ; bittet umb das zunft und stubenrecht. Erkant : wird demselben in seinem petito gegen erlag der gebühr willfahrt. Juravit.

1724

p. 265 François Gallon, kartenmacher gesell von Overne (l59) bey herm Guillaume Affine stehet vor und hat geschwohren.

A few more references to 18th century Strasbourg cartenmacher can be found online here:

http://maisons-de-strasbourg.fr.nf/

From the records of two of his daughters marriage we find the Benoist family were Catholic - there is also a record for a H Benoist cardmaker in 1789, plus several others:

1722 (12.9.), Chambre des Contrats, vol. 596 f° 544-v
Leonard du Bois Traitteur in gegensein Claude Dabeind des Sattlers in dem Königlichen Zeughauß – schuldig seÿe 1328 pfund oder 5312 Livres tournoises zu erkauff: und bezahlung hieunten beschieben und hypothcirten haußes hypothecirt, Eine Behausung und hoffstatt mit allen derselben gebäuden, begriffen, weithen, zugehörden, Rechten und gerechtigkeiten ahm Roßmarckt, einseit neben denen Stößerischen erben anderseit ist ein eck ahne der blauen wolcken gaß hinten auff David Benoist dem Kartenmacher – davon gehen hiesiger Stadt Pfenning Thurn wegen eines dachs 10 ß ane allmend zinß

Pierre Guillemin, fils d’un chirurgien manant de Strasbourg, épouse Christine Agnès Benoist, fille d’un cartier, et devient bourgeois quelques mois plus tard

1728 (21.7.), Me Humbourg (6 E 41, 46)
(Contrat de mariage) Sr Pierre Guillmin Tapissier demeurant en cette ville fils majeur de défunt Sr Pierre Guillmin Chirurgien major au régiment de Bourbon cavallerie et de Dle Catherine Rondoüin Dle Christine Agnes Benoist fille du Sr David Benoist Me cartier bourgeois de cette ville et De Agnes Louise D’amerspach assistée du Sr urbain Rondoüin son oncle maternel Entrepreneur des ouvrages du Roy de la Province d’Alsace et Dle Marguerite Assoret en présence de Pierre Jacquot musicien de la Cathedrale de cette ville son beau frère du chef de De Jeanne Benoist sa femme et Sr Pierre La Chapelle aussy Me Cartier de cette ville son Oncle du chef de Dlle Elisabeth Dolhay (signé) pier guillemain, christine agnes Benoist --

Pierre Guillemin, tapissier, et (1728) Christine Benoist – catholiques

1729 --- In einer allhier Zu Straßburg in der Flader Gaß gelegener und dem Ehemann Zuständiger behaußung ist befunden worden wie folgt.
(M.) Eigenthumb ane einer behaußung. Ein hauß, hoffstatt und höffl. mit allen deßen begriffen, weithen, Rechten, Zugehörden und Gerechtigkeiten gelegen allh. Zu Straßburg in der Flader Gaß, einseit neben Johann Michael Kräutler dem hohltreher 2.s neben Philipp Jacob Zelter dem Maurer, hinten auff H. David Benoist den Kartenmacher stoßend.

1735 Originaire de Ribeauvillé, la marchand Jean Jacques Guising épouse Marie Josèphe Benoit, fille d’un cartier -- tribus in Ecclesia nostra et totidem in Ecclesia Parochiali ad stum Stephanum publice factis proclamationibus (…) sacro Matrimonÿ vinculo in facie Ecclesiæ conjuncti fuerunt Honesti adolescentes Joannes Johannis Baptistæ gissing Joannis gissing et Annæ Mariæ Schmittin Coniugum defunctorum filius et Maria Josepha Benois, Davidis Benois Civis et Agnetis Ludovicæ D’armersbach Conjugum parochiana nostra, (signé) Jean Jacque Guissing, Marie Joseph benoist (i 35)

Guising – Jean Jacques, marchand, et (1735) Marie Josèphe Benoit – catholiques

1738, Echasse (XI 103)
Donnerstag den 18. Decembris Anno 1738 wurde das letzte Quartal Gericht gehalten
Sieur Arnold La Gardelle Entrepreneur und burger alhier, Kläger Contra David Benoiste den Kartenmacher alhier, daß derselbe des Klägers seinen Sohn Zu seinem Lehrjungen angenommen, solches aber nicht berechtiget geweßen seÿe, in deme derselbe bereits noch Zweÿ Lehrjungen habe, und alßo den dritten Zuhalten, Zufolg Kartenmacher Articul Von Paris ungültig, damit nun Kläger seinen sohn Künfftig in Franckreich alß Gesell Passiren Könnte, wollte Er gebetten haben nicht nur den beklagten anzuhalten, daß er die bereits empfangene erste helffte Lehrgeld, sambt denen causirenden Uncösten ihme refundiren, sondern auch sein Sohn die rücrkständige Lehrzeit beÿ einem andern Lehrmeister Vollenden Könne.

Beklager Benoiste sagt Zur Antwort weillen die alhießige Kartenmacher, wegen Haltung deren Lehrjungen Keinen Articul haben, mithin soviel annehmen Können, als sie wollen Zudeme er nicht dreÿ Jungen habe, wie Kläger Vorgiebt, anerwogen beÿ annahm des Klägers seines Sohns sein einer Lehrjung außgetretten und sich unter Königlichen Kriegsdienst begeben den Zweÿten aber Er Gratis und aus barmhertzig Keit angenommen, als bittet Er Kläger anzuhalten, dem Zwischen Ihme den 11. Junÿ Anno 1736. errichteten Accord nachzugeleben, einfolglichen zuverordnen daß deßelben Sohn, seine rückständige 2 ½ Jahr Lehzeit beÿ Ihme Zuvollenden schuldig seÿn solle.

Erkand, seÿe Kläger Zuerlauben, daß sein sohn beÿ einem andern Meister sein rückständige Lehrzeit, aushalten, hingegen beklagter die Ihme bereits behändigte erste helffte Lehrgelds Zubehalten berechtiget seÿn möge, die heutigen Uncosten aber seÿe beklagter dem Kläger zu refundiren schuldig.

1742 (5.3.), Chambre des Contrats, vol. 616 f° 100-v
H. Frantz Boch der handelsmann in gegensein Pierre Jean Laborie des Kartenmachers

1776 (4.1.), Me Fické (6 E 41, 774) n° 258
Eheberedung – Herr Nicolaus Chaineau, der Schifferdecker, Wittiber und burger alhier zu Straßburg eines, und anderen theils die Ehren und tugendbegabte Jungfrau Jeanne Housset, Herrn Charles Housset des Kartenmachers und hiebevorigen burgers zu Nancy, dermalen hier wohnhaft, mit Fraun Antonia gebohrner Sobol erzeugte Tochter, hiebeÿ mit erstermelt ihrem leiblichen Vater Verbeÿstandet – auf Donnerstag den 4. Januarii 1776 [unterzeichnet] nicola chainneaux, janne housset)

1777 (4.9.), Chambre des Contrats, vol. 651 f° 297
H. Charles Antoine Simon Grodval der handelsmann und kartenmacher alß geordnet und geschworener vogt weÿl.

1785, Livre de bourgeoisie 1783-1787 (VII 1559) f° 64-v
fr. Catharina Schoenau gebohrne Housset Carl housset des kartenmachers Zue Nancy erzihlte tochter, Verheurathet mit Niclaus Schoenau dem schifferdecker Und burger allhier erhaltet das burgerrecht a marito umb den alten burger schilling, doch aber daß sie Löbl. Statt Straßburg seith getroffener heurath biß anhero schuldige abgaben Zahlen sollen, wollen dienen Zue E.E. Zunfft der Maurer promisit d. 3.ten jenner 1785.

1789 (23.12.), Me Übersaal (6 E 41, 659) n° 272
H. Benoist dem Kartenmacher, hinten innern stadt- oder Rindshäutergraben,
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: The Fortune of Francois Isnard: A treasury of innovation --

#4
SteveM wrote:
06 Mar 2018, 17:16
There is some mention of the engraver Francois Isnard in previous topic here:
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=821
Yes ...
Thierry Depaulis wrote in 2010 an article "When (and how) Tarot reached Germany" (IPSC 39/2, starting p. 64). The article is excellent, it helps here to develop a basic line of German/Austrian Tarock development.
This was my source. Do you have the article? I attempted to look it up, but I don't know, where it is gone to. MikeH knows a way to look older articles up.

you noted ...
1718
p. 94 François Fournier, kartenmacher gesell von Marsaille aus Provance bey herrn Louis la Boisse in diensten juravit.
Later a Spanish Kartenmacher with the name Fournier became very important.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naipes_Heraclio_Fournier
1785 Francisco Fournier went to live to Burgos due to the revolution which was happening in France. He was French, and all his family worked as printers. When he went to live to Burgos, he married a wealthy Spanish woman called Maria de Reoyo. They had a children called Lazaro Fournier. Lazaro married another Spanish woman called Paula González. They had four children. The youngest was born on 2 March 1849 and he was called Heraclio Fournier.
Heraclio became very successful.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: The Fortune of Francois Isnard: A treasury of innovation --

#5
http://formation.kevinmeunier.com/?page_id=2069

... has pictures of the Blanck & Tschann deck
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Pope and and Popess are changed to seasons. According Depaulis this deck type might have preceded the Tarot Besancon. Laboisse (above mentioned for 1718) was important in relation to this deck.
It's interesting, that he had a helping hand from a man of Marseille, which is the mentioned Fournier.

Jean Henri Blanck
Marchand-cartier actif à Colmar de 1775 à 1792. - Epouse Marie-Elisabeth Knecht, originaire de Sélestat, en 1756. - Reçu bourgeois le 19 janvier 1765. - S'associe avec son gendre Stéphane Amand Tschann, originaire du canton de Soleure (Suisse) à partir de 1775, sous la raison sociale "Blanck & Tschann & Comp."
So the deck is NOT from the early period, but Depaulis had found a similar to one of the seasons , which was made in the first decade of 18th century, as far I remember.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: The Fortune of Francois Isnard: A treasury of innovation --

#6
Huck wrote:
07 Mar 2018, 14:01

Pope and and Popess are changed to seasons. According Depaulis this deck type might have preceded the Tarot Besancon. Laboisse (above mentioned for 1718) was important in relation to this deck.
It's interesting, that he had a helping hand from a man of Marseille, which is the mentioned Fournier.

Jean Henri Blanck
Marchand-cartier actif à Colmar de 1775 à 1792. - Epouse Marie-Elisabeth Knecht, originaire de Sélestat, en 1756. - Reçu bourgeois le 19 janvier 1765. - S'associe avec son gendre Stéphane Amand Tschann, originaire du canton de Soleure (Suisse) à partir de 1775, sous la raison sociale "Blanck & Tschann & Comp."
So the deck is NOT from the early period, but Depaulis had found a similar to one of the seasons , which was made in the first decade of 18th century, as far I remember.
La Boisse (Laboisse), originally from Paris, is the earliest I know in connection with this style of TdB with spring and winter instead of the JJ - some have noted the similarity between some TdB and the noblet, another Parisien, of interest also in the the initial IN appear on the chariot shield of the La Boise -- an early TdB type, but with spring and winter instead of Juno and Jupiter --

A partial deck of Blanck & Tschann is at the BnF, which is the same one as on Kevin Meurnier blog I think, with its handwritten Etteilla numbers (Etteilla himself does mention a deck 'of recent times' from Colmar that replaces Popesse and Pope with Spring and Winter) - there is a partial deck of the La Boisse at the BM, which B&T is clearly modeled upon --
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: The Oriental Pearl of Louis de La Boisse:

#7
SteveM wrote:
07 Mar 2018, 15:10

La Boisse (Laboisse), originally from Paris, is the earliest I know in connection with this style of TdB with spring and winter instead of the JJ - some have noted the similarity between some TdB and the noblet, another Parisien, of interest also in the the initial IN appear on the chariot shield in the Louis La Boise --
"Louis de La Boisse, a la Perle Orientale a Strasbourg"

The Oriental Pearl motif on the four of coins is related to the cardmakers address, as on the two of cups:
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http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/c ... more-views

Here also the Oriental Pearl motif on four of coins copied by Jean Henry Blanck active in Colmar from 1775 to 1792. in association with his son-in-law Stephane Amand Tschann, from the canton of Solothurn (Switzerland) from 1775, under the name "Blanck & Tschann & Comp.
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http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b10537344z
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The "Blanck & Tschann" at the Bnf is copied after the cardmaker La Boise of which we have a partial example at the BM - it represents a curious version of the TdB, replacing the Popesse and Pope with Spring and Winter, instead of Juno and Jupiter --- both unfortunately are incomplete, but there are some cards in one that are not in the other --

British Museum:
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The B&T does not have the Chariot, but the Laboise does, its shield bears the initials "JN":
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La Boisse was from Paris, as was I[ean] N[oblet] ?

The partial Laboise is missing L'hiver, but the B&T has it:
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A wrapper for Louise de la Boise cards:
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La Boisse as you can see written on the wrapper was originally from Paris --

Feine Karten von Louis de La Boisse Kartenmacher von Paris anitzo wohnhaft in Straßburg in der Bruderhofs-Gassen zum Perlen genannt

La Boise was admitted to the Parisian guild of cardmakers in 1683 - his father, Louise la Boisse the elder was also a cardmaker -
[One may see that a Louis de la Boisse is listed as a Parisian cardmaker in the thread "Fait a par Paris"]

La Boisse Junior moved to Strasbourg in 1705 and became a citizen in 1708 and died in 1748.

As well as the entries noted in above thread In the logs of the guild "To Steltz"(1717 & 1718), there are others from March 16th, 1734 and from the 25th
January 1737 with entries about journeymen who worked for him, according to the Daniel Schulz catalogue linked to below.

Another wrapper, with the Griffins and Pearl motif, of the Stuttgart based cardmaker P.C. Thime c1740-1760, of Fine French Cards:
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Peter Christoph Thime, born in 1707, was a cardmaker in Ludwigsburg and died on 11 November 1772 at the age of 65 years. Both of the above wrappers were found with other playing card remnants in the debris of scrap found at Ludwigsburg Castle and can be found together with a description and images of other remnants in a report by Daniel Schulz online here:

https://www.academia.edu/31930921/Spiel ... er_Schloss

As La Boise was originally a member of the Paris guild of cardmakers, one is led back to considering how many elements of the TdB are so similar to that other Paris based cardmaker, Jean Noblet --

The oriental pearl motif seems to have originated with La Boisse c1710, it being a reference to his Strasbourg address, and was simply copied by following cardmakers such as Claude Truc of Grenoble c1717-1731, Thime of Stuttgart c1740-1760,and Blanck & Tschann of Colmar post 1775 -- :
[image source: BnF]
Image
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: The Fortune of Francois Isnard: A treasury of innovation --

#8
SteveM wrote,
Thierry Depaulis wrote in 2010 an article "When (and how) Tarot reached Germany" (IPSC 39/2, starting p. 64). The article is excellent, it helps here to develop a basic line of German/Austrian Tarock development.
To which Huck replied:
This was my source. Do you have the article? I attempted to look it up, but I don't know, where it is gone to. MikeH knows a way to look older articles up.
Depaulis's article is at https://askalexander.org/display/22621/PlayingCard/73

To access "Ask Alexander" you have to belong to the IPCS (or some other affiliated association) and do it through their website. It costs $16 a year to belong, with current issues of the "Playing Card" available as pdf's.

Re: The Fortune of Francois Isnard: A treasury of innovation --

#9
SteveM wrote:
Here also the Oriental Pearl motif on four of coins copied by Jean Henry Blanck active in Colmar from 1775 to 1792. in association with his son-in-law Stephane Amand Tschann, from the canton of Solothurn (Switzerland) from 1775, under the name "Blanck & Tschann & Comp.
Image
_________________________________________________________________

http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b10537344z

The "48" on the 2 of cups and the "74" on the 4 of Coins correspond precisely to Etteilla's number for that card. Earlier you speculated that the handwriting on the 4 of Coins might be Etteilla's due to the "74' on the card. But why are these same numbers on different cards? Did he get his numbering system from these cards, or are these all his cards? We know that Etteilla spent time in Strasbourg. around this time.

Here is the timeline entry, based on Wicked Pack of Cards, by Decker, Depaulis, and Dummett (DDD in the below) (http://www.tarotforum.net/showthread.php?t=250105):
1777-c.1780. Etteilla is in Strasbourg, settling as a “print-seller and bachelor, from Paris, legitimate son of Jean-Baptiste Alliette, burgess and caterer from there, and of Marie-Anne nee Bautray,” according to citizenship records there (he became a citizen of the city). He joins the guild for printers, print sellers, cardmakers, and book-binders. The guild record for 1781 lists him in “guild members no longer resident.” Etteilla himself verifies his stay in Strasbourg in a 1785 comment, saying that “when in Strasbourg, I was pleased to fix M. Cerbere’s youngest son’s birth chart” (DDD p. 82). He says that the best tarot cards are made there. But he objects to the cardmaker Jean-Baptiste Benoit’s removal of the “butterfly” on the “hieroglyph called the Star.” (Kaplan, vol. 2, reproduces the “Benois” deck, whose Star card has no winged creature. It is one of those decks that have replaced the Pope and has Benois producing in Strasbourg starting in 1780.)
I didn't see a Star card in the Gallica link for this deck. There is one for the one with cartomantic notes, the Sarramon, at http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b1 ... 23.highres. Indeed no "butterfly". I wonder if that is consistent, or if one actually has a "butterfly".

Re: The Fortune of Francois Isnard: A treasury of innovation --

#10
mikeh wrote:
08 Mar 2018, 02:48

The "48" on the 2 of cups and the "74" on the 4 of Coins correspond precisely to Etteilla's number for that card. Earlier you speculated that the handwriting on the 4 of Coins might be Etteilla's due to the "74' on the card. But why are these same numbers on different cards?
I didn't meant to suggest the handwriting was Etteilla's, only that he was aware of a deck from Colmar with spring and winter, he mentions it along with other cardmakers such as Tourcaty and Benoit -

Not sure what you mean by "why are these same number on different cards?" Which cards have the same numbers?

I haven't checked the numbers of every card to see how they correspond, but enough to suggest the writer was familiar with the work of Etteila -- 17 is death, 78 the fool, he has made the lovers 13 the card of marriage instead of the Pope, maybe that has something to do with the replacement of the pope by winter?
Here is the timeline entry, based on Wicked Pack of Cards, by Decker, Depaulis, and Dummett (DDD in the below) (http://www.tarotforum.net/showthread.php?t=250105):
1777-c.1780. --- The guild record for 1781 lists him in “guild members no longer resident.” Etteilla himself verifies his stay in Strasbourg in a 1785 comment, saying that “when in Strasbourg, I was pleased to fix M. Cerbere’s youngest son’s birth chart” (DDD p. 82). He says that the best tarot cards are made there. But he objects to the cardmaker Jean-Baptiste Benoit’s removal of the “butterfly” on the “hieroglyph called the Star.”
Does Etteilla actually refer to "Jean Baptiste" Benoit or just "Benoit" ? What are the dates of activity for J-B? I have c1791 to 1820, if Etteilla mentions J-B specifically that would take it back a little earlier -- I've been trying to track down the original french text to confirm --

For the Benoist Family of Strasbourg cardmakers I have:

Benoist(e) , David 1717-1761

Benoit, [?] 1751-1775 [Allemagne]

Benoit, Widow & Son c1780s

Benoit, Jean-Baptiste 1790s (?) - 1820

Benoist, Jean 1794 - ? (His deck is dated 1794 by the BnF, it is ' à la mode révolutionnaire', so certainly post 1791)

If I recall right he mentions something about Benoit's 'nuremburg' blockmaker altering his father's old blocks - Benoit's old blocks would have been Isnards [from Provence], going from the examples we have (those by J-B; and of J Benoist which was altered 'a la mode revolutionaire', the same altered block being used also by L Carey -- it is this altered block 'a la mode revolutionaire' that Jerger probably took as a model (copying from the deck of either Carey or J Benoist) - this altered block of course is too late to be the one intended by Etteilla --

The other examples I've seen of Isnard shows neither a butterfly nor a bird - the bird is part of the Tarot de Marseille pattern rather than the TdB, it likely was never on a Benoit old block to be removed -- perhaps Etteilla mistook the bird of the Tarot de Marseille for a butterfly, his perception of it influenced by Gebelin* (who was using a Tarot de Marseille, unlike Mettlet who was using a TdB)?

In some the lines with vague 'out of line' colouring I think could indeed be seen as a butterfly, here an example from JMD in a ATF thread on the subject:
Image
------------------------------------------------

SteveM

*
XVII. The Dog Star.

Here we have under our eyes a card no less allegorical, & absolutely Egyptian; it is entitled the Star. Indeed, one can see there a brilliant star surrounded by seven smaller stars. A woman bending on one knee who holds two vases upside down and from which two rivers run occupies the bottom of the card. Next to this woman is a butterfly on a flower.

Court de Gebelin: Du Jeu Des Tarots, volume 8 of Le Monde Primitif 1781.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

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