Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#81
Quote:

"Figure 6.5 shows a depiction of the carro with each part clearly labelled: the axles
represent two of the theological virtues, Faith and Hope, who meet at the Law of Grace, while
another part of the cart frame represents Charity. Other components of the chariot represent the
Law of Nature, the Law of Moses, and Eternal Law. The bottom (or rear) section of the carro is
labelled Meditatio glorie (the Contemplation of Glory), along with Purgatory and Eternal Pain.

Each wheel is identified as one of the four cardinal virtues: Justice, Temperance, Fortitude,
Prudence, and each spoke of each wheel is given a name (for example, the spokes of the
Temperance wheel are labelled castitas, pudicitia, virginitas, parsimonia, sobrietas, abstinencia,
continencia, mansuetudo).

The moralizing depiction of the carro is organized so
that to reach the top of the carro one must perform a symbolic journey from the bottom,
beginning with the choice of Eternal Pain, Contemplation of Glory or Purgatory. Once the
middle way (Contemplation of Glory) has been chosen, the traveller (in this case Francesco il
Vecchio) journeys along the main horizontal shaft of the cart, and he can then be guided by the
wheels of Justice and Temperance through Hope towards Eternal Law, and can pass through the
Law of Grace and the front axle, representing Faith. The uppermost wheels, Fortitude and
Prudence, guide him to his final destination, Bonum honestum (honourable good). Once he has
reached his goal, he becomes a moral guide for his subjects."

end quote from:
Heraldry in the Trecento Madrigal by Sarah M. Carleton

The figure is based upon one in Francesco Caronelli’s De curru carrariensi (On the Chariot of the Carrara)

A couple of 14th century madrigals re: the Family Carrara and their canting arms device (carro):

Inperiale sedendo (Bartolino da Padova?)

Inperiale sedendo fra più stele
Imperial, sitting among many stars
dal ciel descese un carro d’onor degno
a cart worthy of honour descended from the sky,

soto un signor d’ogni altro via benegno.
under a lord more kind than any other.


Le rote sue guidavan quattro done,
Four women guided its wheels,

Justitia e Temperantia con Forteçça
Justice and Temperance with Fortitude

et am Prudenza tra cotanta alteçça.
and Prudence among such nobility.


Nel meço un Saracin con l’ale d’oro
In the middle a Saracen with golden wings

tene’ el fabricator del so tesoro.
keeps the maker of his treasure


Image


Per quella strada (Johannes Ciconia)

Per quella strada lactea del cielo,
Along the heavenly milky way,

da belle stelle ov’è’l seren fermato,
from beautiful stars where clear skies lie,
vedeva un carro andar tutto abrasato,
one saw a chariot go all enflamed,

Coperto a drappi rossi de fin oro;
Covered in red cloth with gold brocade;
tendea el timon verso ançoli cantando.
its shaft pointed towards angels singing,
El carro triumphal vien su montando.
the triumphal chariot came climbing up.

De verdi lauri corone menava,
It brought crowns made of green laurels,
che d’alegreça el mondo verdeçava.
that filled the world with happiness.

[ibid Carleton, p115

The Carrara family, Padua & Petrarch:
http://www.padovamedievale.it/info/padua-da-carrara/en
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#82
Sorry, Steve, I was still editing my post ...
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=1154&start=70#p18828
Possibly the diamond ring is just a wedding symbol .... !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Something goes here very wrong in the analysis ... The diamond ring belongs to the Hymenaios, not to Sforza nor Este.

The second picture in the Festival book 1475 ...
http://digi.vatlib.it/view/MSS_Urb.lat.899
... shows Pudicia (folio 7r)...



... with various heraldic signals, between them the Sforza lion with quince. The specific diamond sign is missing.

In the following picture (folio 11r) the diamond sign appears:

Image


The inscription below says something about "COIUGIO" ...
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#83
Huck wrote:Sorry, Steve, I was still editing my post ...
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=1154&start=70#p18828
Possibly the diamond ring is just a wedding symbol .... !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Something goes here very wrong in the analysis ... The diamond ring belongs to the Hymenaios, not to Sforza nor Este.

I went through the album and did see that: part of the accompanying text says -

"two wills, two hearts, two passions, are bonded in marriage by a diamond"

Marriage of Constanzo Sforza of Pesaro & Camilla of Aragon, 1475

The torch is the traditional symbol of Hymen - perhaps here with the (Sforza?) device added? Or is there an earlier association of the wedding ring with hymen?
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#84
Sorry, I was again still editing, I think ...

Ross, when he once 2009 opened the theme, had this reflection ...
Ross G. R. Caldwell wrote:Here are two images -

Image


Image


Algeri held, maybe still holds, it to be Borso's sign. More people hold it to be Alessandro Sforza's - I'll have to check who it is.

I found an example -
Image


but I don't have the details on hand.

---------------Edited (it was Enrica Domenicali who considers it Borso's - this debate between Algeri and Domenicali happened in 1987) -

Here is what I wrote privately on the subject in August -

"I posted about this image on the Aeclectic forum in February of last year, in case you want to read it there -
http://www.tarotforum.net/showthread.ph ... ge=2&pp=20

Interesting information about it is that one author, dal Pozzolo, says that the manuscript was made in Pesaro, and Trapp says it was made for Borso d'Este (both quoted below):

...
I used "Alessandro diamond" to find older discussions ...
search.php?keywords=alessandro+diamond& ... mit=Search

Marcos Filesi once showed much engagement, and translated large parts of the festival book ...
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=418
We made that at the base of ...
http://www.bl.uk/treasures/festivalbook ... rFest=0171

As printer is given a "Levilapidus, Hermanus (Printer in Vecenza)"

This printer doesn't appear elsewhere, as it seems ... perhaps a pseudonym?
"Lepidus" (a real antique writer) was chosen by Alberti as a pseudonym. This sounds a little bit like Levilapidus.

The better known printer Erhard Ratdolt (Erhard sounds a little bit like Hermanus, though Hermanus should come from Hermann). Ratdolt came (possibly somehow in context to Regiomontanus) around 1475 to Italy, and published since 1476 in Venice. He used planet pictures with similarities to the planet pictures in the Festival book.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#85
A closer look:

Insignia with diadem of Ercole or Borso d'Este

From the Triumph of Love among the Triumphs of Petrarch fresco in the Palace of Pio, Carti
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot
Attachments
SignEste.jpg
SignEste.jpg (93.07 KiB) Viewed 415 times

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#86
#-o #-o #-o .... .-) ... I made the same research in parallel time ....

I found the motif of Ross again ...

Image


... here ...
http://www.ilmostardino.it/2014/09/17/c ... filosofia/

One must turn the picture to get it right.

Image


A description of the sala da Trionfi (1470-80) (Petrarca picture) according this source.

This was a theme of mine recently ....
viewtopic.php?f=23&t=1125#p18087

The Father Time picture is this ...

Image


... which isn't the picture of Ross, as far I can see it. It must be from another place (at the same Palazzo).

The picture has the comment (by google) ...
Carpi, il segno di Petrarca a Palazzo dei Pio. Prosegue la mostra sui Trionfi rinascimentali inaugurata in occasione del Festivalfilosofia ‹ IL MOSTARDINO.IT
http://www.ilmostardino.it
particolare del Trionfo dell'Amore- insegna con diadema di Ercole d'Este
... so it seems, that it accompanies the triumph of Love.

Somehow I captured in this research the comment:
Manfredo Pio, il capostipite della famiglia, era un grande amico del Petrarca e Lionello Pio, in occasione del suo matrimonio con Caterina Pico della Mirandola nel 1474, fa affrescare una sala con rappresentazioni allegoriche che si richiamano ai temi del lavoro petrarchesco: Amore-Castità-Morte-Fama-Tempo-Eternità. E’ rimasto molto poco degli affreschi.
Manfredo Pio married Caterina Pico della Mirandola. So the painting should have happened either short before or after 1475, when Camilla/Costanzo had their show.

Around the same time (a little before) Ercole d'Este had married Leonora d'Aragon ... and this was the larger event. Logic makes me assume, that the symbol appeared then, and that Caterina/Manfredo and Costanzo/Camilla followed.
Rumour (perhaps evidence) tells, that already Borso knew the symbol. The youngest daughter of Niccolo d'Este, who married, was Bianca Maria (who got her name by Bianca Maria Visconti). She married to the Mirandola court (where Catarina Pico de Mirandola came from) in 1468. Her husband was Galeotto_I_Pico, an older brother of Giovanni Pico de Mirandola. The father of both had died in 1467.

Borso had no children by himself. The marriage of Bianca Maria was his great opportunity to develop the symbol, I suspect.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#87
SteveM wrote:A closer look:

Insignia with diadem of Ercole or Borso d'Este

From the Triumph of Love among the Triumphs of Petrarch fresco in the Palace of Pio, Carti
Around 1470-1480, probably in connection with the marriage of Catherine Pico and Lionello Pio, is painted on the walls of a room, triumphal wagons of allegorical figures: Love, Death, Eternity, Fame, Chastity, Time (the Triumphs of Petrarch).

The Pio di Savoia, an ancient noble Italian family, was first mentioned by good authorities in the 14th century. From the House of Este they received the lordship of Carpi and later they acquired the fiefs of Meldola, Sassuolo, etc. Many members of the family were distinguished as condottieri, diplomats and ecclesiastics.

Lionello was the son of Albert I, lord of Carpi and Camilla Contrari of Ferrara. He was taken very young for a career as a condottiero, and in 1467 was in the service of Bartolomeo Colleoni against the Medici. He became lord of Carpi, Verrucchio, Meldon and Sarsina. In 1471 he is stipulated by Borso d'Este, Marquis of Ferrara, to some of agreements of dependency* with the d'Este family.

Caterina Pico was the firstborn daughter of seven children (among which the most famous was Giovanni Pico della Mirandola) of Gianfrancesco Pico (1415-1467), lord of Mirandola and Concordia and Giulia Boiardo , daughter of Feltrino of Count Scandiano and cousin of Matteo Maria Boiardo

Married Lionello Pio di Savoia , lord of Carpi and had three children:

Catherine, a nun
Lionello (? -1535)
Alberto (1475-1531), his successor.

Widowed in 1480 , in 1484 she wed Rodolfo Gonzaga: Rudolph died 6 July 1495 during the famous Battle of Fornovo leaving his wife and six children at an early age. Catherine inherited the fief of Luzzara, and her life was tragically ended in the palace of Luzzara in 1501, when she was strangled by her ladies maids with motives to rob her.

SteveM

*Nel 1471 stipulò con Borso d'Este, marchese di Ferrara, alcuni accordi di dipendenza con la famiglia d'Este.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#89
This we do know about Trionfi card productions in Naples ... Where Leonora and Camilla came from, and also the future Hungarian queen Beatrice d'Aragon.
Naples, 1473.

"[O]n 24th November 1473 'Tusino Manni, aiutante di camera del Re, riceve un tari e 10 grana per covrire con carta nuova e dipingere un gioco di trionfi'" (Tusino Manni, adjutant in the King's chamber, receives one tari and 10 grana for covering with new paper and painting a pack of triumphs).

(Nicola Antonio de Giorgio, "Playing Cards and Tarots in Naples, 15th-18th Centuries", (_The Playing Card_ vol. 34 no. 2 (Oct-Dec 2005) pp. 101-110) p. 101 and note 3.) (Note Ross Caldwell)
Naples, 1474. "[O]n 4th February 1474 one 'Paolo de Paris riceve 3 tari per altretanti spesi in un gioco di carte detto trionfi donato alla ill. a D. Beatrice d'Aragona, figlia del Re [i.e. Ferdinand or Ferrante I of Aragon]" (Paolo de Paris receives 3 tari for as many expenses in a pack of cards called triumphs, given to the illustrious Lady Beatrice of Aragon, daughter of the King)

(Nicola Antonio de Giorgio, "Playing Cards and Tarots in Naples, 15th-18th Centuries", (_The Playing Card_ vol. 34 no. 2 (Oct-Dec 2005) pp. 101-110) p. 101 and note 3.
"Paolo de Paris" should get the attention of Alain.

... originally reported by ...

Image


Image
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#90
Huck wrote: This is a detail from a Triptychon by Rogier von Weyden ca. 1460, commissioner had been Alessandro Sforza.
...A larger part of the picture (a triptychon):
The young figure on the left is passably Costanzo (who would have been 13 in 1460)...but the person on the right who is presumably the main patron, Alessandro, looks nothing like Alessandro (see the medal of father and son below) - surely a commissioner would have expected at least a semblance, especially if the son is recognizable. Is it possible this 1460 painting was for Alessandro's daughter Battista's wedding to Montefeltro in 1460, the same date of the painting? The woman looks up at St. John the Baptist on the right panel, Battista's patron saint as her namesake, thus suggesting that identifty. Perhaps celebrating a role for the young Costanzo in the wedding rituals, accompanying her to Urbino, etc. (and presumably to maintain relations between the two nearby houses). Admittedly the 'groom' doesn't look much like Montefeltro either, but we seemingly only have older paintings of him, and not from when he was 38 when he got married; at all events they would not have wanted to show his facial disfigurement in war in which he lost the right eye (and the bridge of his nose should be missing as well), so his portrait would necessarily have been idealizing. At all events, it doesn't seem like Alessandro, also married to a Montefeltro for his second wife (Costanzo's mom died in childbirth), would have depicted himself with her under any circumstances: "In 1448 Seraphina [aka Sveva da Montefeltro] married Alessandro Sforza, Lord of Pesaro. Ten years afterwards her husband gave himself up to a dissolute life, and ill-treated her. He forced her to enter the convent of Poor Clares at Pesaro" (Wiki).
Image
Remarkably, Montefeltro would have himself portrayed in the exact same pose - kneeling in armor with gauntlets on the ground before him - with no identifying imprese on his person (as in the Weyden painting), 12 years later in his famous Brera Museo altarpiece:
Image


Perhaps the Alessandro painting was intended to stay in the Sforza family and merely mark the occasion of Montefeltro being bound to the House of Sforza (Francesco supposedly arranged the match)?

Phaeded

PS Hard to say how much weight Battista would have put on since her wedding and after childbirth, not to mention the famous diptych was painted after her death - but here's the comparison:
Weyden patroness and Battista Montefeltro diptych.jpg
Weyden patroness and Battista Montefeltro diptych.jpg (27.61 KiB) Viewed 404 times

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