Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#31
Huck wrote:
That is Piero, with the 7 Palle and feathers on his horse - (The figure on the donkey to his left, not shown, being Cosimo the Elder)

Note beneath the palle is the motto semper - which according to some was first adopted by Cosimo and was also part of Piero's personal impresse - as on the oculus stained glass window with the Mamluk script around it - but according to others was introduced by Piero - for example the site here, re: the birth tray of Piero's son Lorenzo c1449:

http://italianrenaissanceresources.com/ ... promotion/

quote:

It was with the birth of Piero’s first son, Lorenzo de’ Medici, who was already called il magnifico—the magnificent—during his lifetime, that Medici patronage developed into an extravagant dynastic display. For the event of his son’s birth, Piero commissioned a magnificent childbirth tray, known as a descho da parto, depicting the Triumph of Fame, an allegory drawn from Petrarch’s I Trionfi. Most childbirth trays known from inventories and extant examples appear to have been intended to carry food and gifts into the birth chamber. The Triumph of Fame tray, however, given its large size and extremely fine painting, was unquestionably intended as a showpiece to celebrate the continuation of the Medici line and the alliance of the Medici and Tornabuoni families. Fame, a female figure dressed in classical costume, stands high and confident on a globe, a sword in one hand and a statuette of Cupid in the other, receiving the acclamation of a band of warriors and nobles. The image of Fame for Lorenzo’s childbirth tray was almost certainly chosen to announce that this son of the Medici family was destined to be the leader of the city of Florence. The tray contains an abundance of references to the Medici in coats of arms and imprese. The reverse of the tray, usually not displayed, presents three emblems that were introduced to Medici imagery by Piero and were to become a staple of Medici family decoration: the diamond ring; the three colored ostrich feathers, signifying the three theological virtues, hope (green), faith (white), and charity (red); and the scroll inscribed with the motto Semper, or “Always.”

Image
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#32
Thank you Steve for the identication of Pietro de Medicis and the motto "Semper" of Cosimo and Pietro : I would not have noticed it if you did not draw my attention on.

Maybe this is why Huck thought of Cosimo : as he had also the Motto...
Anyway :-bd

As for the birthtray for Lorenro's birth, excellent find for the Motto as being Pietro's under Cosme's ruling as head of the family.
I also note that in 1449, Lorenzo's birth, the Palles are 8 : that is Cosme "normal" Palles as his father's also.
(though Huck showed one of 7 under Cosme's time).
Corresponds in my take to the rows underneath the first rows of 7 of the psChVI Charioter : Pietro's "normal" Blason
already present under his father's leadership as you've shown in 1460-1462 ...
Web page : http://letarot.it/page.aspx?id=23&lng=eng

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#33
BOUGEAREL Alain wrote:Thank you Steve for the identication of Pietro de Medicis and the motto "Semper" of Cosimo and Pietro : I would not have noticed it if you did not draw my attention on.

Maybe this is why Huck thought of Cosimo : as he had also the Motto...
Anyway :-bd
Here is larger image, with Cosimo the elder on the donkey to Piero's left:


Ritratto di Piero il Gottoso (sul cavallo bianco a destra del padre Cosimo) nell'affresco della Cavalcata dei Magi della cappella dei Magi di Palazzo Medici-Riccardi a Firenze, opera di Benozzo Gozzoli (si riconosce anche dal motto Semper sulla bardatura del suo cavallo)

Portrait of Piero the Gouty (on white horse to the right of his father Cosimo) in the fresco of the Magi in the Magi Chapel of the Palazzo Medici-Riccardi in Florence, the work of Benozzo Gozzoli (also known by the motto Semper on the trappings of his horse )
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#35
BOUGEAREL Alain wrote:Perfect

Thinking aloud...
The opposition of Donkey / Cosme and white horse / Pietro does not argue in favor of a Pietro in the shadow of his father ('btw the horses of the charioter are white but mere coincidence probably)
The portrayal of him riding a mule would be in reference to his re-entry into Florence following his exile which took on a symbolic role, a part of his propagated 'identity' -


"On 6th October 1434, Cosimo de’Medici rode in to Florence, returning from a year-long exile,
on the back of a mule. The ruling oligarchy which had banished him had collapsed and its leader,
Rinaldo degli’Albizzi, had fled. Although Cosimo returned to Florence as a free man, his constitutional
position remained ambiguous. De jure, Cosimo was a powerless citizen. De facto, he
was the leader of a faction which, within a year, controlled Florence itself. The precise nature of
Cosimo’s power, between his return in 1434 and death in 1464, and how he reconciled the conflict
between his de jure and de facto positions, is the subject of this essay.

Historians examining Cosimo must rely on three major primary sources, all written with different
aims and consequently riddled with bias. The most prominent is Machiavelli’s Florentine Histories.
Despite writing on a Medicean commission, Machiavelli viewed Cosimo as the destroyer of Florentine
republicanism; his description of Cosimo returning “as though from a great victory” is unsurprisingly
militaristic. By contrast, Cosimo’s biographer, Vespasiano di’Bisticci, sought to present
him as a dutiful citizen; he therefore stresses the humble connotations of Cosimo returning on muleback.
However, Vespasiano was “a born flatterer”, writing in the pay of Lorenzo il Magnifico, Cosimo’s
grandson.

A third view is presented by Aeneas Sylvius de’Piccolomini (later Pope Pius II),Cosimo’s contemporary and fellow ruler. Having stayed in Florence in 1454, he described Cosimo as “the regulator of law; less a citizen than master of his city. Political councils were held in hishome; the magistrates he chose were elected; he was a king in all but name and legal status.”

From these sources, two conflicting interpretations of Cosimo’s power emerge: Piccolomini’s traditional
portrayal of Cosimo as the omnipotent but unseen puppet-master of Florentine politics; and
Vespasiano’s apologist image of Cosimo as a humble citizen, working for Florentine interests."

“A king in all but name”
To what extent is this an accurate reflection of the nature of Cosimo de’Medici’s power over Florence between 1434 and 1464? by JOSHUA KIMBLIN
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#37
By contrast, Cosimo’s biographer, Vespasiano di’Bisticci, sought to present
him as a dutiful citizen; he therefore stresses the humble connotations of Cosimo returning on muleback.
However, Vespasiano was “a born flatterer”, writing in the pay of Lorenzo il Magnifico, Cosimo’s
grandson.
Well, I think, that's too easy. As far I remember: Bisticci had to leave Florence after 1478, and the biographies were published after this time. "Writing in the pay of Lorenzo de Medici" is likely not correct. I think, that he didn't like the modern ways of Lorenzo.
In quell'ozio (1482) cominciò a scrivere, separatamente e con intenti e modi varî, le Vite di quanti aveva conosciuto: signori, dignitarî, letterati, amici. Alcune sono di meri ricordi episodici: altre "a modo di commentarı" tracciati alla buona per fornire ai dotti materia, onde stendessero in latino eloquenti biografie degne di quegli illustri. Ma in questo volgare discorsivo, che ha spesso la libertà sintattica delle pagine del Cellini, le Vite hanno un'immediatezza di rappresentazione che aggiunge un modesto pregio d'arte al loro valore documentario.

Le Vite, da lui stesso raccolte senza ritoccarle, furono primamente edite da Angelo Mai in Spicilegium Romanum, I (1839), in numero di 103; e da ultimo, criticamente, da L. Frati (Bologna 1892) con l'aggiunta di altre 6.
http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/ves ... aliana%29/

I seems, that it was printed rather late.

*************

Image


I agree, that it is not Cosimo's horse, but Piero's. But nice to see, how the errors have worked in this object.

Wikipedia.it gives the clear idea, that ...
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stemma_dei_Medici

Image


... but this looks too simple. If it would have been so simple, then there wouldn't be so much confusion about it. I guess, that this is a modern internet interpretation.

Some years ago, there wasn't so much material to the question.

Image


Villa Caffagiolo, started to become inhabited c. 1458, used by Lucrezia Tornuabuoni and her kids mainly, probably in the summer months. Pulci lived in 5 km distance, and so young Lorenzo and Pulci became friends - likely.
The "six palle" naturally don't say anything, likely there was enough opportunity in c. 550 years to modernize the villa. Heraldic signs at the outside suffer in long years, logically.

**************

Image


... given with the quote ...
It was with the birth of Piero’s first son, Lorenzo de’ Medici, who was already called il magnifico—the magnificent—during his lifetime, that Medici patronage developed into an extravagant dynastic display. For the event of his son’s birth, Piero commissioned a magnificent childbirth tray, known as a descho da parto, depicting the Triumph of Fame, an allegory drawn from Petrarch’s I Trionfi. Most childbirth trays known from inventories and extant examples appear to have been intended to carry food and gifts into the birth chamber. The Triumph of Fame tray, however, given its large size and extremely fine painting, was unquestionably intended as a showpiece to celebrate the continuation of the Medici line and the alliance of the Medici and Tornabuoni families. Fame, a female figure dressed in classical costume, stands high and confident on a globe, a sword in one hand and a statuette of Cupid in the other, receiving the acclamation of a band of warriors and nobles. The image of Fame for Lorenzo’s childbirth tray was almost certainly chosen to announce that this son of the Medici family was destined to be the leader of the city of Florence. The tray contains an abundance of references to the Medici in coats of arms and imprese. The reverse of the tray, usually not displayed, presents three emblems that were introduced to Medici imagery by Piero and were to become a staple of Medici family decoration: the diamond ring; the three colored ostrich feathers, signifying the three theological virtues, hope (green), faith (white), and charity (red); and the scroll inscribed with the motto Semper, or “Always.”


... .-) ... No word about the 8 palle. What is, if the tray was a present by the grandfather Cosimo? Then Cosimo invented ring, feathers and "semper".

Image
Huck
http://trionfi.com

About the Medicis Stemmas on the psChVI Charioter

#38
About Palles on the psChVI Charioter

Image


Looking from the pseudo Charles VI Charioter' s Rows of Palles :
First row : 7
Underneath : 8 (twice in 2 colors : one on the Chariot, one the path of the horses )

Suggested identifications :

7 Palles without Fleur de Lys : Pietro de Medicis before May 1465
8 Palles ... : Cosimo the Elder



Is there a consensus on this point?

Nota
1. Face value suggested Interpretation : Pietro riding on the path of his father ...
I believe that the iconographical details had to be evident and simple to understand for those living at this time and viewing the painting of the card...

2. Hypotheticals datations :
- 1461 when Pietro becomes as his father before Gonfalonier of Florence
- 1464 at the death of Cosimo

August 1464 - May 1465 is more rational but the Oculus of Pierro found by Steve is dated 1460-1462 ...

Reminder for those who haven't followed the thread :
May 1465 is the datation when Louis XI gives to Pietro de Medicis the Fleur de Lys - it is not present on the 7 Palles of the Charioter.
August 1464 is the date of Cosme the Elder death.
So a Stemma with 7 Palles without Fleur de Lys should logically be between this very short period.
Web page : http://letarot.it/page.aspx?id=23&lng=eng

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#39
Huck wrote: ... .-) ... No word about the 8 palle. What is, if the tray was a present by the grandfather Cosimo? Then Cosimo invented ring, feathers and "semper".

Image
If memory serves me right - the above medal was commissioned by Piero for (or in memory of?) his father --- and the epiteth of Cosimo as 'father of his people' (ppp) was invented and propogated by Piero (?)

General consensus is that it is Piero who first used personal impresse (such as ring, feathers and semper) - which later other medici (including Cosimo) also adapted or adopted for their own use - previous Medici used the Medici stemma (the varying number of Palle - which generally decreased in number (from 11 to 9 to 8 to 7 to 6) over several generations --- but not personal impresse until Piero --
August 1464 - May 1465 is more rational but the Oculus of Pierro found by Steve is dated 1460-1462 ...
It is generally considered to be early '60's - but records show the artist/craftsman working for Piero between '61 to '64 - so could be as late as 64 --- however no reason not to consider it early, as most of the components of Piero's personal impresse (feathers, rings, six palle, motto semper) are also clearly there on his horse in the Magi fresco (c'59/60/61?)* - and feathers, rings and motto as early as Lorenzo''s birth tray --- not sure when the eagle/falcon appeared (possibly c61 when he became Gonfalonier (a play on galfalconier?)

SteveM

* If we consider that details such as impresse and insignia may be the last to be completed, then 1461 becomes likely, and has the appeal as datation of Piero becoming Gonfalonier --
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Pseudo Charles VI Tarot : Exhibit on line Bnf

#40
Steve ...
General consensus is that it is Piero who first used personal impresse (such as ring, feathers and semper) - which later other medici (including Cosimo) also adapted or adopted for their own use - previous Medici used the Medici stemma (the varying number of Palle - which generally decreased in number (from 11 to 9 to 8 to 7 to 6) over several generations --- but not personal impresse until Piero --
If I remember correctly, the Medici parted their work in the manner, that Piero cared more for cultural matters, Giovanni for the banque and Cosimo for politic. If Piero then made the suggestion, that for the cultural appearance of the Medici the use of impresa and other symbolic signs would be useful, then this was his role in the family, as it was also his role to care for the Riccardi chapel. And his wife Lucretia helped and engaged for literature and the poets.

Piero di Cosimo de' Medici got this role by the death of his uncle Lorenzo di Giovanni de' Medici (c. 1395 - 23 September 1440), Cosimo's younger brother, who had a similar function in the period before. One of the first activities of Piero was his engagement for an illustrated Trionfi poem edition from Matteo de' Pasti.

Steve ...
If we consider that details such as impresse and insignia may be the last to be completed, then 1461 becomes likely, and has the appeal as datation of Piero becoming Gonfalonier --
Maybe ... but Gozzoli worked till 1464, as far I know. There was a great public Trionfo related to the three mages (likely related to 6 January 1465), possibly indicating, that the Riccardi chapel was then totally finished, and that the Trionfo was the "opening festival".
The possibility exists, that the horse decoration was the last detail, and added then, after the death of Cosimo. The Riccardi palace was ordered in 1444, but the work is said to have taken 20 years. The seven palle decorations
...

Image


Image


... look, as if if the central palle is treated in a special manner, possibly a sign, as if they were made after May 1465.

It's not obvious to me, if the central palle of the glass window is also already treated in a special way.

Image



*************

Image


https://www.aparences.net/es/arte-y-mec ... lorentina/
Blasón de los Médicis con once bolas, ilustración de un manuscrito del siglo XV que contiene un comentario sobre el “De anima” de Aristóteles por el médico y filósofo Niccolò Tignosi da Foligno, (Florencia, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana)
http://link.springer.com/referenceworke ... 48-4_361-2
Tignosi, Niccolò

Born: 30 March 1402, Foligno
Died: 14 September 1474, Pisa
David A. Lines

Abstract
Niccolò Tignosi was a physician and professor of medicine active in Tuscany (especially Florence) in the second and third quarters of the fifteenth century. More or less at the same time in which Johannes Argyropoulos began his famous activity of interpreting Aristotle there, Tignosi published a commentary on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, which received a rather hostile response from his contemporaries, prompting him to defend himself in a very interesting opusculum. He also wrote on Aristotelian logic and psychology and penned a series of historical and political treatises, displaying a desire to remain close to the Medici family. His works point to the numerous intersections between humanism and scholasticism in Renaissance Florence.
I guess, that the text designer either had an old Medici design or possibly he suspected, that the 6 palle would become once 5 palle instead of 6. ????

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Argyropoulos
Argyropoulos reached Italy in 1456 and taught in Padua, Florence and Rome. Rome he reached in 1471 (so he left Florence in Lorenzo's time, possibly disappointed by too much Platonism). Before he was part of the delegation to the council of Florence from 1439-1444.

**************

Alain ...
BOUGEAREL Alain wrote:About Palles on the psChVI Charioter

Image


Looking from the pseudo Charles VI Charioter' s Rows of Palles :
First row : 7
Underneath : 8 (twice in 2 colors : one on the Chariot, one the path of the horses )

Suggested identifications :

7 Palles without Fleur de Lys : Pietro de Medicis before May 1465
8 Palles ... : Cosimo the Elder

Is there a consensus on this point?
Yes, this is an interesting observation.

Cosimo was very sick in his late years. Maybe there was some change in the family-hierarchy already before 1464. After the death of Piero's brother Giovanni (1463) and Piero himself also serious sick the mood of the Medici should have been in a catastrophic state.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

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