Trionfi card poem by Pico de Mirandola

#1
Once found by Ross Caldwell ... somehow lost in the jungle for some time ...

Finally ... the Trionfi poem of Pico de Mirandola ("triunfi soi le carte")
Sonetto 28
Amor ben mille volte e cun mille arte,
come uom sagio che amico se dimostra,
temptato ha pormi ne la schera vostra,
che empieti de triunfi soi le carte;
ma la ragion di Lui m’era in disparte,
che la strata dil cel vera mi mostra:
così l’uno pensier cun l’altro giostra
e ‘l cor voria partir, né pur si parte.
Onde ancor né gioir nostra alma o trista
far può Fortuna, e furno in grande errore
gli ochi, se lo contrario a lor pareva.
Gelosia forse, che ‘l nostro Signore
seguir suol sempre, offerse cotal vista
al cor, che di Madonna alor temeva.
https://inpoesia.me/2011/01/22/giovanni ... e-volgari/

Somehow I've in memory, that there were reasons to assume 1481 as the year of production ... I might err.
... .-) ... perhaps a friendly poet finds reason to translate it.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Trionfi card poem by Pico de Mirandola

#2
I don't remember finding this, but thanks for the credit, Huck.

I'm having to struggle for the meaning, but I don't think this qualifies as a "trionfi poem", if by that you mean something like trionfi appropriati. Carte can mean pages of a book, too, so it could be a reference to Petrarch's trionfi.

We just have to a get a decent translation to figure out what he means in this sonnet.
Image

Re: Trionfi card poem by Pico de Mirandola

#3
Pico was in Padua in 1480-82 so would have been composed there.

A quick (botched) google-machine translation:
https://translate.google.com/translate? ... rev=search

Amor a thousand times and a thousand cun art,
as a man who Sagio friend if he proves,
temptato he will ask me to your mask,
that empieti de soi triunfi cards;
but the raison He Was in the sidelines,
that the strata dil cel real shows me:
so each thought the other carousel cun
and 'l cor Voria partir, or even part of it.
Waves or even our soul rejoice or sad
Fortuna can be, and in great error furno
After eye, if contrary to their thought.
Perhaps jealousy, that 's our Lord
seguir wont always, offered Cotal views
the cor, which alor Madonna feared.

Re: Trionfi card poem by Pico de Mirandola

#4
Ross G. R. Caldwell wrote:I don't remember finding this, but thanks for the credit, Huck.
...:-) ... long ago, but it was you. It was a Trionfi (triunfi) note to us then, but then it was forgotten to add it to the list. ... in private communication ...
Yesterday I found this sonnet by Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. The meaning is obscure, but he appears to be inspired by playing a game of trionfi to think of the torments of love.

I have tried to translate the first few lines.

...

(A thousand times and with a thousand arts,
Like a wise man who shows himself to be a friend,
Love has tempted me in your group,
That the cards are full of trumps;

But His reason was beyond me,
That the road of the true heaven showed to me:
…)

Pico scholar Giovanni Pasetti says the sonnets were written between 1479-1486. He has this comment:

"Troviamo qui un componimento complesso, che racconta il conflitto fra Amor terreno e Amor celeste. Molto interessante è la paralisi psicologica che tormenta il protagonista, incapace di comprendere la vera natura della situazione. Egli assiste ad un gioco, ad un torneo amoroso i cui esiti sono del tutto incerti; mentre ammira le carte su cui spiccano i trionfi, con doppio riferimento al mazzo dei Tarocchi e alle virtù della donna che riempiono i fogli di poesie, i suoi pensieri combattono fra loro, e la strada del Paradiso non può sopraffare il sentimento."

"Here we find a complex poem that recounts the conflict between earthly Love and heavenly Love. Very interesting is the psychological paralysis that haunts the protagonist, unable to comprehend the true nature of the situation. He takes part in a game, a love tournament whose results are quite uncertain; while admiring the cards in which the triumphs stand out, with double reference to the Tarot deck and the virtues of women who fill the pages of poems, his thoughts are fighting each other, and the road of Paradise can not overcome the feeling. "
(I have modified the surprisingly good Google translation only slightly)

http://xoomer.virgilio.it/gpasett/h5.htm


13th of October, 2011, short before Franco Pratesi started his activities with "1453 AN EARLY ARRIVAL OF TRIUMPHS INTO ROME" / 3 November 2011"

At 21st of October 2011 we'd started the discussion of the Arnold Esch book 2007.
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=743&p=10624&hilit=Esch#p10624

... :-) .. in the follow-up we had a lot of Triunfi notes ... .-) .. especially in the Arnold Esch paper.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Trionfi card poem by Pico de Mirandola

#5
The dialect is strange - google seems to analyse it as Corsican rather than Italian (but indeed, Corsican may well be closer to the archaic Italian dialect than modern Italian!?), and translates 'triunfi' as cuturnu (Lit, a woman with horns, figurative a cuckhold, a man married to an unfaithful wife).*

empieti I thought probably impiety, wickedness, ungodly (that blasphemous triumph of his cards); but I see Ross translates it as 'full' (?), presumably reading it as empito (to fill, full), and am inclined to go with Ross's expertise rather than my wild guesses.

Voria I think is an archaic form of vorrei;

'soi' = archaic dialect 'of his' ? (of his, that is Amor's/Love's, cards)? which cards/pages of his are full of triumphs (Amor's cards are filled with / full of triumphs?

Amor has tempted me to your tribe/mask/train,
his cards/pages are filled with triumphs.

his thoughts are fighting each other I get:
così l’uno pensier cun l’altro giostra
so each thought with another joust

"... and the road of Paradise can not overcome the feeling." ?

ma la ragion di Lui m’era in disparte,
che la strata dil cel vera mi mostra:
così l’uno pensier cun l’altro giostra
e ‘l cor vorrei partire, né pur si parte.

but reason was on the sidelines,
to show me the true path of heaven:
so one thought with another joust
and let me start with the heart, at least part of it.

Am unsure of the 'double reference to the Tarot deck and the virtues of women who fill the pages of poems...'? Does it mean 'carte' is to read with a double meaning, as both cards and pages?

It seems partly play on the common trope (as found in Dante, Boccacio, Petrarch and of course Boiardo) between Reason/Desire-love (Ragione/Amore):

Ragion fe’ Laura del fanciul perverso
Cupìdo trionfar, ché mai non torse
Occhio da la virtù né il piè in traverso.

Reason made Laura triumphant
over the perverse child cupid, she never turned
her eyes from virtue, nor put a foot wrong.

SteveM

*Which, though I don't believe it is the meaning in this poem, reminds me of Pulci's minchi- poem:

Milan puo far di molti ravibuoli;
tal ch’i perdono a que’ miei minchiattarri,
se non dicessin chiu come assivoli.

Which I think means something along the lines of:

Milan can make so make so many kinds of ravioli
for this I forgive them, my minchiattarri,
if they did not say chiu like the horned-owl.

L'Assivolo' The Horned Owl- similar allocco (owl/fool) -- the horns of the owl = the horns of a cuckolded husband, as in the Florentine poet Cecchi's play L'Assivolo' The Horned Owl -- in Cecchi's play he is cuckolded several times and so is said to have 'horns three time high'. Cecchi also uses 'chiu' as a sound alike syllable for the hoot of the owl -- the would be lover Ambrogio 'hoots' three times like an owl as a password 'chiu chiu chiu'.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: Trionfi card poem by Pico de Mirandola

#6
The dialect is strange - google seems to analyse it as Corsican rather than Italian (but indeed, Corsican may well be closer to the archaic Italian dialect than modern Italian!?), and translates 'triunfi' as cuturnu (Lit, a woman with horns, figurative a cuckhold, a man married to an unfaithful wife).*
"triunfi" instead "trionfi" is very much used in the Esch paper (related to the custom register in Rome), it seems to be common in the language of the custom officers (in Rome). And the import is rare, it's for the officer a word, that they spell different:

One importing merchant: 7x triunfi, 2x trunfi, 2x trumfi
Another: 5x triunfi, 1 trunfi, 1x trumfi

but also "triumphi, treunfi, treumfi, triomfi, trionfi, trumpfi, trionphi, triomphi, trumfi" (all these more rare)

triunfi is definitely the winner in the spelling race (in Rome), roughly counted 55x triunfi of 107 (so a little more than 50%), 1x trionfi of 107

*************

Pico in his wiki biography ...
Soon after this stay in Florence, Pico was travelling on his way to Rome where he intended to publish his 900 Theses and prepare for a "congress" of scholars from all over Europe to debate them. Stopping in Arezzo he became embroiled in a love affair with the wife of one of Lorenzo de' Medici's cousins. It almost cost him his life. Giovanni attempted to run off with the woman, but he was caught, wounded and thrown into prison by her husband. He was released only upon the intervention of Lorenzo himself. The incident is wholly representative of Pico's often audacious temperament and of the loyalty and affection he nevertheless could inspire.

Pico spent several months in Perugia and nearby Fratta, recovering from his injuries. It was there, as he wrote to Ficino, that "divine Providence ... caused certain books to fall into my hands. They are Chaldean books ... of Esdras, of Zoroaster and of Melchior, oracles of the magi, which contain a brief and dry interpretation of Chaldean philosophy, but full of mystery."[9] It was also in Perugia that Pico was introduced to the mystical Hebrew Kabbalah, which fascinated him, as did the late classical Hermetic writers, such as Hermes Trismegistus.
It looks, that Pico wasn't often close to Rome. I don't know much of his life. The love affair was May 1486 and then (after this) he wrote his 900 theses (so he can't have intended to publish them in Rome before) in a state of writer ecstasy, half crazy (so says my memory of that, what I read, but this wasn't much).

Perhaps the "triunfi" in the poem tells, that he wrote this 1486? Naturally not as a sure evidence ...
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Trionfi card poem by Pico de Mirandola

#7
Huck wrote: Perhaps the "triunfi" in the poem tells, that he wrote this 1486? Naturally not as a sure evidence ...
Spelling variants were widespread across and within dialects. I think Mirandola is just writing in his usual (Gallo-Italic/Emiliano) dialect (not a strange dialect, just strange to me), to which Corsican might be related due to the immigration to Corsica from Gallo-Italic regions of Italy (some of Pico's siblings were wed to hereditary rulers of Corsica). I wouldn't take the spelling of triunfi as even a remote evidence, let alone a sure one, of a location in Rome in 1486. What have you to compare it too? How many variants are there in Lombardian, or Emiliano, or Genoese, or Tuscan, etc, etc.

Mirandola as is known burnt most of his poems. The 45 sonnets that remain for us were preserved in a single anthology of poems with a variety of poets of varying quality from the court of Ludovico (il Moro) Sforza.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

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