1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#1
At ...
SteveM wrote:
Huck wrote: The Boiardo Trionfi poem is the oldest, for which we have a clear "22" as number of the trumps (rather different to the usual trumps). There are good reasons to date this poem to January 1487, wenn Lucretia d'Este, illegitimate daughter of Ercole d'Este married ... the highest trump in the Boiardo poem addressed the Roman Lucrezia.
Have you got a link to the full argument for 1487, I remember reading some fuller explanation somewhere sometime, but having searched can't find it. I do remember I found the argument rather weak, but perhaps the argument has been more fully expanded since then.

The arguments for an earlier dating is the poem itself - for a start it is not very good, far from the qualities for which the poems of his maturity are more famous. It is full of the faults of beginners (archaic language, simplistic rhymes, commonplace phrases & themes), and also its imitation of Petrarch is typical of the poetry of his youth - c.1460's.
I think, I've never developed a full version of the theories to the Boiardo poem, it just developed from time to time in different contexts, distributed here and there.
In the general theories about the date of the poem from poetry experts I've read both opinions, very early as you say (1461) or very late (even 1494). So I don't care (I don't claim to understand these poetry arguments), just following my own opinion, that 21 Fortezza-Lucrezia is just the highest trump and the suspicion is given, that this refers to the celebrated bride Lucretia. As there are a few (not much) confirming details, my version looks promising.

I found this today:
Il 23 gennaio dell’anno 1487, Annibale Bentivoglio si recò dunque a Ferrara per incontrare Lucrezia e condurla a Bologna: il viaggio di andata e ritorno che il principe e il suo seguito intrapresero si svolse nella sequenza di alcune tappe rappresentative, situate nei possedimenti extraurbani della famiglia bolognese (Arienti, ms. 4603; Fortunati 1976). Il corteo nuziale, giungendo da Ferrara, entrò in città dalla porta di Galliera, per poi seguire una sorta di percorso allegorico tracciato nel tessuto urbano secondo l’intento del principe di celebrare i luoghi a lui più cari. Come abbiamo visto, ogni luogo era riferito a una Virtù in forma di apparato effimero: a porta Galliera la Speranza attendeva il beneaugurate ingresso in città della sposa, momento emblematico e rappresentativo per il consolidamento dell’alleanza estense; a ponte Reno era collocata la Carità; davanti alla chiesa della Madonna di Galliera, uno dei luoghi di culto dei Bentivoglio, la Temperanza; in piazza Maggiore, la sede del governo, si trovava la Giustizia; a piazza e palazzo della Mercanzia era la Prudenza, virtù necessaria nei commerci; in piazza di Porta Ravegnana, e in particolare verso la chiesa di San Giacomo, si trovava la Fede, che celebrava l’ingresso nel ‘quartiere bentivolesco’; a palazzo Bentivoglio, infine, la Virtù della Fortezza chiudeva il percorso
.
http://www.engramma.it/eOS/index.php?id ... zi_english

Fortezza looks here in the bride Trionfo like the highest (= last) virtue.

The last words of the poem:
Fortezza d'animo in Lucretia liete
Exequie fece: per purgar sua fama
Se uccise, e all'offensor tese atra rethe,

Dando exempio a chi 'l nome e l'honore ama.

**************

Inner strength made happy the death of
Lucretia: to clean her fame
She killed herself, and she prepared for the offender a dark net,

Giving an example to those who love their own name and honour.
Triumphal march of Lucretia in Bologna:
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#2
The placing of virtues in the marriage procession was to a large extent chosen according to appropriateness of place, starting with hope at the gate, there is justice with the seat of governance, prudence 'a necessary virtue in businesses' (virtù necessaria nei commerci) with the palace of Merchandise', Fortezza with the palace home possibly a play on Fortezza as fortress and home as fortress; but also the palace of Bentivoglio is not only the home of Annibale, but also of his mother, Genevra Sforza, so a play also upon Fortezza and Sforza.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#3
SteveM wrote:The placing of virtues in the marriage procession was to a large extent chosen according to appropriateness of place, starting with hope at the gate, there is justice with the seat of governance, prudence 'a necessary virtue in businesses' (virtù necessaria nei commerci) with the palace of Merchandise', Fortezza with the palace home possibly a play on Fortezza as fortress and home as fortress; but also the palace of Bentivoglio is not only the home of Annibale, but also of his mother, Genevra Sforza, so a play also upon Fortezza and Sforza.
Well, the poem of Boiardo likely aimed to have been made for the opportunity of Lucretia wedding and the triumphal celebrations led her into this Fortezza. A lot of poets made poems on Lucretia and Annibale at this opportunity ... Boiardo himself wasn't present and the Tarocchi poem isn't mentioned. Probably Boiardo was send to Modena, where he was installed in a political function at the same time. A hostile relative to Boiardo was at the wedding, possibly Ercole wanted to avoid their meeting. So Boiardo might have presented his poem at a later time, then knowing about the details of the celebrations and the "final Fortezza".

The wedding is astonishingly well documented by Bolognese sources, much better than others.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#4
Huck wrote:
In the general theories about the date of the poem from poetry experts I've read both opinions, very early as you say (1461) or very late (even 1494). So I don't care (I don't claim to understand these poetry arguments)
Well, I am better fit to critique English poetry than Italian, but even with my limited knowledge of Italian and Italian poetry it seems pretty clear to me that it is an early rather than a mature work. I'd be interested to see the arguments for it being such a late work (1494!?). Do you have any links to where these may be found?

The only 'expert' argument I know for a later dating is that of Giulio Reichenbach, not based upon the qualities of the poem itself, which no student of poetry could argue is anything but immature and awkward, but upon the range of its classical (historical and mythological) references which he claims " attest to a broad and mature education". I would agree that it attests to a good education but would disagree that such implies a later dating as any student of Latin and Greek is bound to work with classical exemplars and an abundance of such references fairly early on in their studies, especially with the nature of humanist education of the time in Italy with its emphasis on classical sources. Besides being awkward in style it is very imitative of Petrarch, which was typical of his early works (even if you don't understand poetry arguments, surely you can see its debt to Petrarch?). It shows none of the originality or flair he later developed after becoming more familiar with contemporary poets of his time, such as Pulci, under which influence his poetry truly matured.

I recall one of your arguments we discussed before was that it belongs to the genre of 'women are better than men', a late genre more popular towards the end of the century and into the next, to which I was nonetheless able to provide you with earlier examples. But such an argument is irrelevant anyway, as I now recognize that the theme is that of the typical Petrarchian woman (women as models of virtue), and not original with Petrarch, but as old as chivalry romances at least.

Renier and Vittori date it to 1461, I don't think necessarily as early as that, but certainly in the 60's or early seventies.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#5
I remember this source ...
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lexikon_des_Mittelalters
... likely in the article "Boiardo". A standard work for university libraries in Germany.

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Generally one has to see that Boiardo used specific tricks, mainly about the starting words of each poem.

Italian numbers with examples of the first line of the connected "number" tercets:

1 uno ... AMORE, un che cum te cerchi bon stato,
2 due ... SPERANZA dubio alcun non ha smarrita [do or du]
3 tre ... GELOSIA tristo rende un lieto core
4 quattro ... TIMOR quattro destrier d'un carro a l'uso
5 cinque ... AMOR ce insegna non aver timore
6 sei ... SPERANZA, sei pure amica a natura!
7 sette ... GELOSIA se te gionge a veder presso
8 otto ... TIMOR obturba i sensi, e faccia smorta
9 nove ... AMOR nov'arte trova; e sotto el mele
10 dieci ... SPERANZA desta il pover che lavora [de or di]

Such poetical games naturally limits that, what a poet could express in just 3 lines. The final result possibly may look like "bad poetry", but the "higher aim" is just simply to display poetical tricks.

For the typical first line of a court card we have always a figure:

Kings:
TIMOR Dyonisio del tonsore in vece
GELOSIA fe' Vulcano in forme nove
SPERANZA Enea fuor del Trojan confine
AMOR fece che Jove già discese

Queens: Andromeca, Juno, Judithe, Vener
Knights: Ptolomeo, Turno, Jason, Paride
Pages: Fineo, Argo, Orazio, Cyclope

Trumps: We have there a program, which presents always either a virtue or a vice (first word, first line) and a major protagonist (first or second line), and the major protagonist changes from male to female with the proceeding trump row:

1-3-5-7-9-11-13-15-16-17-19 ... male figures
2-4-(6)-8-10-12-14-16-18-20 ... female figures with an exception on (6)

Beside (6) exceptions are only observable for "0" and "21"

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0
Mondo, da pazzi vanamente amato,
Portarti un fol su l'asino presume,
Ché i stolti sol confidano in tuo stato.

Mondo (normally trump name for 21) and Fol (Fool, usually "0") are essential figures of the Trionfi game. The "major protagonist" is missing in this tercet.

*********

6
Gratia a secreti e savii non va a sorte,
Ma con ragion, ché con amore ha il vanto
Colui che asconde le passion piu forte.

"Gratia" is mentioned at the standard place for virtue and vice (first word, first line). The expected female protagonist is missing, instead we find the word "amore", which in the given is a title of a suit (passion amore) in the Boiardo poem and also a standard terminus in the usual Trionfi game, mostly for the 6th card (it's likely not an accident, that Boiardo uses his number 6 just for the presentation of the word "amore").
Marco translated the "che" as a not named male protagonist ...

Grace does not go by chance, but with reason,
To the discreet and wise, for in love can be proud
He that hides his strongest passion.

The whole work (Boiardo's poem) is about the 4 stoic passions and Amore is the strongest of them. Boiardo uses the expression "forte", which we see reappear in the poem 21 about Lucrezia in the word "Fortezza". Boiardo as a poet "hides" here something, which the reader shall detect. He disturbs his order, in which he presents 10 vices and 10 virtues in connection to 10 male and 10 female protagonists. The reader shall note this disruption and shall make his conclusions.
From the perspective of the situation (wedding) the "he" naturally hides Annibale, the future husband of Lucrezia.

****************

21
Fortezza d'animo in Lucretia liete
Exequie fece: per purgar sua fama
Se uccise, e all'offensor tese atra rethe,
----
Dando exempio a chi 'l nome e l'honore ama.

Fortezza (a Trionfi card name) and Fama (another Trionfi card name) appear, and "Lucretia" (the female protagonists) appears. Lucrezia has fled from the tercet 6 (missing female protagonist) to tercet 21 (with a not expected protagonist, the poem "0" had also none) to underline the condition, that on the day of the wedding the bride is naturally the most important and highest person.

Marco translated:
Inner strength made happy the death of
Lucretia: to clean her fame
She killed herself, and she prepared for the offender a dark net,

Giving an example to those who love their own name and honour.
Let's assume, that Boiardo created for his offenders (various poem commentators, who assumed, that this would be a "bad" and therefore "early poem") "a dark net".
I guess, that the offenders simply didn't understand Boiardo's secret intentions. And I think, that it is rather difficult for a harmless poetry specialist to give his judgment, if he isn't also a specialist for Trionfi cards and their developments.

And I personally don't claim to have understood the Boiardo poem completely. Perhaps there are more not discovered tricks.

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At one of our old geocities pages, now archived at ...
http://www.oocities.org/autorbis/boiardo.html
... the 10 pairs of Boiardo's 20 tercets (without 0 Fool/Mondo and 21 Lucrezia/Fortezzo) were interpreted as a scheme of the kabbalistic life tree (from 2003), which was considered long before the date January 1487 was discovered as relevant for the Boiardo Tarocchi poem (which happened in November/December 2007). The nowadays possible context to the actions of Pico de Mirandola in December 1486 were naturally not given then.

For the number trick (above shown) Boiardo in the opening gave the following words ...
Amor, speranza, gelosia e timore
son le passion, e un zerzetto han le carte
per non lassar chi giocarà in errore.

Il numero ne' versi si comparte,
uno, due, tre, fin al grado maggiore,
resta mo' a te trovar del gioco l'arte.

***********

Marco's translation:

Love, hope, jealousy and fear
Are the passions, and the cards have a tercet
So as not to leave the player in error.

The number in the verses runs:
One, two, three, ending at the highest;
Now it remains for you to find the art of the game
So Boiardo doesn't say much to guide the reader to the exploration of the poem. The reader needs some personal prudentia, otherwise he simply gets a "bad poem".
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#6
Huck wrote: 6
Gratia a secreti e savii non va a sorte,
Ma con ragion, ché con amore ha il vanto
Colui che asconde le passion piu forte.

"Gratia" is mentioned at the standard place for virtue and vice (first word, first line). The expected female protagonist is missing, instead we find the word "amore", which in the given is a title of a suit (passion amore) in the Boiardo poem and also a standard terminus in the usual Trionfi game, mostly for the 6th card (it's likely not an accident, that Boiardo uses his number 6 just for the presentation of the word "amore").
Marco translated the "che" as a not named male protagonist ...

Grace does not go by chance, but with reason,
To the discreet and wise, for in love can be proud
He that hides his strongest passion.
Marco has not translated 'a secreti' (to his secrets?), which parallels the secreto (his secret) of the previous verse, so I would say they should be read together; as you say the lack of a named female figure (who is however present in 'she has the boast') together with the phrase '...to his secrets and wise men who choose not by chance (fate/lot) but by reason' (if indeed I have translated that more or less correctly, it is a little different to what Marco has) may indicate a hidden puzzle.

I am not sure 'amore' was likely 'the sixth card', in many of the earliest orders, and in the Tarocchi Appropriati of the Ferrarese ladies, the sixth was temperance.
The reader shall note this disruption and shall make his conclusions.
Perhaps also the reader would recognize the Petrarchian source he is copying.

This stanza and the previous one (which should be read together as corresponding to each other - Secreto Anthicoo fo and Gratia e secreti (Antico's secret & Grace to his secrets) also provide a good example of Matteo's indebtedness to Petrarch which was typical of his early work, borrowing here not only the theme (triumphs), rhyme scheme (terza rima) and indeed some of the very same rhymes (for example see below), and some of the same exemplars. Viti has this card as being depicted by the three nude graces with their 'secret parts' hidden, but let us turn instead to three kindred spirits from Petrarch's Triumph of Cupid also found together and 'undivided':

Trassimi a que' tre spirti che ristretti
eran già per seguire altro cammino,
e dissi al primo: - I' prego che t'aspetti.

I went to three spirits that together
were ready to follow another path,
and I said to the first: “'I pray thee wait.”


Et egli al suon del ragionar latino,
turbato in vista, si rattenne un poco;
e poi, del mio voler quasi indivino,

And he, hearing my Latin accent,
troubled in sight, stayed a while;
and then, as if divining my desire


disse: Io Seleuco son, questi è Antïoco
mio figlio, che gran guerra ebbe con voi;
ma ragion contra forza non ha loco.

he said:-I am Seleucus, and this is Antiochus
my son, who had great war with you;
but reason against force has no place.


Questa, mia in prima, sua donna fu poi,
ché per scamparlo d'amorosa morte
gliel diedi, e 'l don fu lecito tra noi.

This, my wife first, then his,
because to spare him an amorous death
I gave her to him, and it was fair between us.


Stratonica è 'l suo nome, e nostra sorte,
come vedi, indivisa; e per tal segno
si vede il nostro amor tenace e forte,

Stratonica is her name, and our fate,
as you see, undivided; and to such a degree
we see our love enduring and strong,


ch'è contenta costei lasciarme il regno,
io il mio diletto, e questi la sua vita,
per far, vie più che sé, l'un l'altro degno.

She was content to lose her kingdom,
I my beloved, and he his life,
each thinking one another more worthy.


E se non fosse la discreta aita
del fisico gentil, che ben s'accorse,
l'età sua in sul fiorir era finita.

And if it were not the wisdom
of the fair physician, who well understood,
the flowering of his youth was over.


Tacendo, amando, quasi a morte corse,
e l'amar forza, e 'l tacer fu virtute;
la mia, vera pietà, ch'a lui soccorse.

Loving in silence, he almost ran to death
with the strength of his love and virtuous silence;
my will, true mercy, which rescued him.



Matteo:

Secreto Anthioco fo, tanto che corse
Per Strathonica quasi fino a morte;
Ma il phisico gentil ben lo soccorse.

Anthioco was so secret , that he ran
near to death for Strathonica;
But the fair physician rescued him.


(Pet:
Tacendo, amando, quasi a morte corse,
e l'amar forza, e 'l tacer fu virtute;
la mia, vera pietà, ch'a lui soccorse.

Loving in silence, he almost ran to death
with the strength of his love and virtuous silence;
my will, true mercy, which rescued him.
)


Matteo
Gratia a secreti e savii non va a sorte,
Ma con ragion, ché con amore ha il vanto
Colui che asconde le passion piú forte.

Grace to secrets and wise men who choose not by fate
but with reason; for lovingly she can boast
he who hides the strongest passion.


(Pet:
Stratonica è 'l suo nome, e nostra sorte,
come vedi, indivisa; e per tal segno
si vede il nostro amor tenace e forte,

Stratonica is her name, and our fate,
as you see, undivided; and to such a degree
we see our love enduring and strong,
)

Each of the three seems mutually bound with boasts of the others greater grace and love, Anthioco who in silent virtue came near to death for love, Stratonica content to give up her Kingdom and Seleucus willing to give up his wife:

ch'è contenta costei lasciarme il regno,
io il mio diletto, e questi la sua vita,
per far, vie più che sé, l'un l'altro degno.

She was content to lose her kingdom,
I my beloved, and he his life,
each thinking one another more worthy.


In Petrarch's 'Secret Book' of course, we find among his three dialogues his discussion of those strongest passions; the four stoic passions which Boiardo gives to the four pip suits.
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#7
The major argument is about the 10 pairs 1-2, 3-4, 5-(6), 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, 13-14, 15-16, 17-18, 19-20, in which Nr. 6 behaves unusual.
The "amore" in the tercet 6 is a minor point.

Well, we can go for the details of the poem, tercet after tercet, if these are indeed valid statements.

tercet 1:
L'ocio Sardanapallo occisoso in piume
Tenne, e in lascive concubine e gola,
Tanto che del regnar perse il costume.

Marco:
Lazyness kept Sardanapalus idle between feathers,
Lustful concubines and banquet,
For so long that he lost the habit of reigning.
"Ocio = Lazyness" is the vice, Sardanapallo (male) is the protagonist.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardanapalus
Diodorus says that Sardanapalus exceeded all previous rulers in sloth and luxury. He spent his whole life in self-indulgence. He dressed in women's clothes and wore make-up. He had many concubines, female and male .
The last king of the Assyrians, somehow it describes, why the Assyrians lost their empire.

tercet 2:
Fatica fece Hyppolita, che sola
De le amazone merito corona:
E in Scithia e in Gretia anchor suo nome vola.

Marco:
Hyppolita endured such efforts, that she is the only one
Of the amazons who is crowned by merit:
And her name still flies in Scythia and in Greece.
Fatica means somehow "tired (from work)", something, which never happened to the lazy Sardanapalus. Hippolyta, the active queen of the Amazons, is an antipode to Sardanapalus as the activities or no-activities ocio and fatica are antipodes. This makes tercet 1 and tercet 2 to a pair, and so it repeats through 3-4, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, 13-14, 15-16, 17-18, (19-20), with some doubts about the pair 19-20.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippolyta
It's clear, that Hippolyta has the virtue, and Sardanapalus the vice.

Could this be hidden Trionfi cards symbols? In this case, yes. Sardanapalus could be the gambling Bagatello, the Amazon (associating virginity) Hippolyta could be meaning the Popess in another costume.

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tercet 3
Desio accese Actheon de una persona
Celeste, si che in cervo fu converso:
Perho troppo alto l'hom desio non pona.

Marco:
Actheon was inflamed by desire of an heavenly
Person, so much that he was transformed into a deer:
So a man should not put his desire too high.

Actheon, the man, who became a stag by the curse of Diana, looks apparently a little stupid, at least it seems to be the opinion of Boiardo. This "Desir-Desire" is naturally a vice.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actaeon

tercet 4
Ragion fe’ Laura del fanciul perverso
Cupìdo trionfar, ché mai non torse
Occhio da la virtù né il piè in traverso.

Marco:
Reason made Laura triumph over the perverted
Child Cupid, because she neither moved
Her eye from virtue nor ever put a foot wrong.
Here we meet a well known figure of Trionfi card history, Daphne-Laura from the Michelino deck, then also mentioned together with Cupid-Amor as in this poem. "Virtue" and "triumph" is noted in the text, and it seems clear, that she presents a virtue. Reason and desire are again antipodes.

She is a virgin, of course, and we have to look back to Hippolyta, which as an Amazon also had the attribute "virgin and therefore "Papessa" in this Boiardo-poem-riddle, but this seems to be wrong as Daphne-Laura is simply the better "virgin".
Hippolyta in one version of her story had married Theseus, and she got a son Hippolytos, who was desired as a lover by Theseus' next wife Phaidra, but the son didn't like it, and Phaidra killed herself accusing Hippolytos. Theseus cursed his son, the son died in a typical chariot accident and a mythical mirror-story to King Oidipus of Theben, who killed his father, who drove on a chariot.

Looking on the possibility, that the Boiardo-figures might relate to the Tronfi figures, we get the idea, that not Hippolyta, but Daphne-Laura was the Papessa, and Hippolyta should have the function of an Empress, and then - naturally - the mentioned Actheon should present the Emperor. Well, Actheon mutated to a stag, and the ankles of a stag looks like crown.

Looking at the Ferrarese order, as it is presented on the list of the unknown Franciscan, there we have 2-Empress, 3-Emperor and 4-Papessa.
Primus dicitur El bagatella (et est omnium inferior). 2, Imperatrix. 3, Imperator. 4, La papessa (O miseri quod negat Christiana fides)

The same order had Tommaso Garzoni (1587 (La piazza universale), who also had strong connections to Ferrara.

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As 5th tercet we should expect something like a pope ... indeed 2 connected persons behave "like a pope": a son loves his step-mother, but doesn't talk about it and gets sick. The father, when noting the reason for the sickness of his sun, retires as ruler and and also as husband.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#8
Huck wrote: Marco:
Reason made Laura triumph over the perverted
Child Cupid, because she neither moved
Her eye from virtue nor ever put a foot wrong.
Here we meet a well known figure of Trionfi card history, Daphne-Laura from the Michelino deck, then also mentioned together with Cupid-Amor as in this poem. "Virtue" and "triumph" is noted in the text, and it seems clear, that she presents a virtue. Reason and desire are again antipodes.

She is a virgin, of course, and we have to look back to Hippolyta, which as an Amazon also had the attribute "virgin and therefore "Papessa" in this Boiardo-poem-riddle, but this seems to be wrong as Daphne-Laura is simply the better "virgin".
Hippolyta in one version of her story had married Theseus, and she got a son Hippolytos, who was desired as a lover by Theseus' next wife Phaidra, but the son didn't like it, and Phaidra killed herself accusing Hippolytos. Theseus cursed his son, the son died in a typical chariot accident and a mythical mirror-story to King Oidipus of Theben, who killed his father, who drove on a chariot.

Looking on the possibility, that the Boiardo-figures might relate to the Tronfi figures, we get the idea, that not Hippolyta, but Daphne-Laura was the Papessa, and Hippolyta should have the function of an Empress...
C'mon Huck, you know which virtue pairs with Cupid-Amor (the Papessa is not even a virtue)....
Image

...and Chastity is related to the iconography of the Chariot.

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#9
hi Phaeded,

there had been different virtue(-vices) models, generally. For instance ...
http://trionfi.com/visconti-genealogy
... the Visconti used once in their genealogies ...
1. Faith
2. Hope
3. Charity
4. Justice
5. Fortitude
6. Temperance
7. Prudence
8. Piety
9. Clemence
10. Magnificence
11. Intelligence
12. Humility
Image


I've explained earlier, that the 20 discussed termini ...
(presented in an overview at a rather old webpage from 2003 http://www.oocities.org/autorbis/boiardo.html )
.... are taken from Boiardo's poem (the first words of the tercets 1-20, "0" and "21" have card titles as first words, "Mondo" combined with "fol" and "Fortezza" with Lucretia). I attempt to analyze Boiardo's poem, not Petrarca's "Trionfi", at this place.

Tercet 4 addresses the Ovid story, in which Amor in revenge filled Apollo with love and Daphne-Laura with a strong antipathy to Apollo. Boiardo's keywords are "reason versus desire", not "love against chastity" as in the "Trionfi"

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I agree, that the original female driver of the Chariot in very early Trionfi decks was connected to Chastity. But that's now the Boiardo Tarocchi poem and therefore just another poet and another theme, somehow connected to Stoic passions.
Btw the poem is at ...
http://www.tarotpedia.com/wiki/Boiardo,_Matteo_Maria
... and the trumps appear in chapter 5
http://www.tarotpedia.com/wiki/Boiardo_ ... Vano_Mondo
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: 1487 Lucrezia's wedding / Boiardo's Tarocchi poem

#10
Huck wrote: Tercet 4 addresses the Ovid story, in which Amor in revenge filled Apollo with love and Daphne-Laura with a strong antipathy to Apollo. Boiardo's keywords are "reason versus desire", not "love against chastity" as in the "Trionfi"
It seems pretty clear to me that it is Petrarch's Laura that Boiardo is referencing here in his poem, if you look at the discussion pages of the poem at tarotpedia you will see I suggested it at the time together with the translation of the phrase 'she never put a foot wrong", both of which Marco at least seems to have agreed with. As with most of his early poems it is heavily modeled upon Petrarch's works, not only the Triumphs (the triumphal theme (which does necessitate he used the same triumphs or same ordere as Petrarch, any more than Petrarch did when he took the theme from Boccaccio's l'Amorosi Visione), the terza rima scheme, some of the figures) but also his secrets, book on fortune (the four passions) & also Africa (some other of the figures).

You said "The "amore" in the tercet 6 is a minor point", despite which you then go on to try and match Boiardo's trumps with those of more standard trumps. An example which clearly cannot be based on sequence (card 6 = card 6 of some early standard order), nor with comparisons with many subject matters, except with a great deal of stretching (to the absurd degree apparently of a stag's ankle looking like a crown!?)
Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different.
T. S. Eliot

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