Ars Geomantica ... by Petrarca (?)

#1
12 pages ... Ars Punctandi (= Geomancy) by Petrarca (?)

http://books.google.de/books/about/Ars_ ... edir_esc=y
has nothing, but gives the title, and it seems to have been produced in Cologne

www.gesamtkatalogderwiegendrucke.de/docs/M31533.htm
gives info about a production in Leipzig. Petrarca is given as the author, but ...
Note: "Anm.  Autor der „Ars punctandi“ ist nicht Petrarca, sondern Coluccio Salutati, vgl. Hirsch, Rudolf: Printing, selling and reading 1450–1550. Wiesbaden 1974."
Petrarca is not the author, but Coluccio Salutati.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coluccio_Salutati

Anyway, it's interesting, that Salutati was interested in geomancy.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Ars Geomantica ... by Petrarca (?)

#2
Good find, Huck. Geomancy was fairly respectable in those days. It would be interesting to see the inside of that book, if it's been transcribed into modern type. According to Hirsch the work was reprinted in an Italian journal, 1909. See http://books.google.com/books?id=4NUIAQ ... q=Salutati, p. xvi, for the reference.

Hirsch's book looks interesting. It's at a local library where I have borrowing privileges, so I'll have to get over there.

Re: Ars Geomantica ... by Petrarca (?)

#4
Thanks ... it looks disappointing. Or has the text anything remarkable? The 16 figures seem to be missing. Or the text is not complete quoted? It's bound together in a book with other texts of a later date (Marco's text).
I note, that only the printer was from Cologne, the printing location was Leipzig, but the Wiegendrucke page gives Wolfgang Stöckel as printer (1497/1500) ... in contrast to the Wolfenbüttel edition ([Arnold von Köln], 18.VII.1493).

The author of the other text seems to be ...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Heynlin

I wonder, if "Arnold von Köln" might be Arnold Pannartz (who is given as "from Cologne"). Pannartz was lost in Rome in the 1470s.
Huck
http://trionfi.com

Re: Ars Geomantica ... by Petrarca (?)

#5
That it is a booklet on punctuation is suggested even in the snippet on p. xvi of the 1974 edition, in the top line.
My library has the 1967 edition. Footnote 30, which Hirsch is amending in the 1974 introduction, is in the middle of a discussion of the increasing need for correct punctuation as books became available to more and more people.

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