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Re: Tractatus de deficatione sexdecim heroum, text and translation

Of course we want to how and why Marziano created his Vesta. Short answer: Vesta/Hestia is one of the 12 Olympian gods and she allowed a strong representative in the Virginities suit. But I'd also propose that it was the very occasion/circumstances of the production - it was to be played in the hom...

Re: Tractatus de deficatione sexdecim heroum, text and translation

Nevermind on the need for an epitome of Plutarch's Numa or that Filelfo's Latin translation came a decade later than Marziano's text; one of the fairly numerous manuscripts based on the late 14th century Tuscan translation would do just fine: Less than ten years after Simon finished his Latin versio...

Re: Tractatus de deficatione sexdecim heroum, text and translation

Well, per Petrarch, everyone else is venal and under the sway of Cupid in his Triumph of Love, except for chaste virgins, so naturally they'd be above everyone in Cupid's train. And there is an entire suit called "Virginities" - it has to have some meaning in the game. The virgins certainly could h...

Re: Tractatus de deficatione sexdecim heroum, text and translation

No Numa Pompilius in the Pavia library. Back to the thornier issue of an epitome then (which again, seems more likely given Marziano's lack of Greek and his abbreviated format). A better on-line translation of Plutarch's Numa, with pagination and section numbers at least (sorry I didn't use this to...

Re: Tractatus de deficatione sexdecim heroum, text and translation

Ross, I think I may have figured out what this moralizing, religion-focused version of Vesta is all about – Marziano’s description sounds like a truncated biography of the founder of Roman religion (and Marziano’s deck is nothing if not that): Numa Pompilius . One can find Numa mentioned in Boccacio...

Re: Tractatus de deficatione sexdecim heroum, text and translation

But the idea that the Virgins themselves beat other trumps, irrespective of their rank, is innovative. I seem to remember forms of Tarot where one trump is singled out as the most powerful, or the object of the game. This is not the typical point-trick game. Well, per Petrarch, everyone else is ven...

Re: Tractatus de deficatione sexdecim heroum, text and translation

There is more surprise, by the way, with Vesta, the central and major part of whose chapter is unparalleled in any mythographic source ancient or medieval. It is repeated, verbatim, in the Vita of a French saint two centuries later. The relationship between these two texts remains a mystery that re...

Re: Tractatus de deficatione sexdecim heroum, text and translation

Finally, he apologizes for adding Cupid, but says that the game demands it. What rule can we infer "demands" Cupid? So this is how I mean to be creative in coming up with rules, a plausible reconstruction, but not one I'd offer as an historical argument. Would anybody be up for trying to make games...

Re: The Cary-Yale Kings – a nod to Visconti genealogy?

One problem with your argument, Phaeded, is that this is not the only Visconti Love card ever made. If nothing else, there is the Brera-Brambilla's. What do you suppose it looked like? Why wouldn't it have had a marriage bed, too? ... Because Brambilla doesn't date from 1428 (Filippo's wedding year...

Re: Tractatus de deficatione sexdecim heroum, text and translation

Good info Ludophone. hypothetical reconstruction for Marizano's game?... Do we give a card, say Cupid, the role of Excuse? Very relevant question Ross. It is the last trump, like tarot's Fool, and all hand-painted Fools are erotically charged (I'd argue the PMB madman with goiters is reaching toward...

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